“He said he met with AAPA last week and they …

Comment on No shift in council’s priorities in the river by Hal Duell.

“He said he met with AAPA last week and they are having discussions with traditional owners.” I was in the public gallery during last Monday’s council meeting and heard Director of Technical Services, Greg Buxton, make this statement.
One question: When he said they are having discussions, did he mean the Town Council and AAPA are having discussions with the traditional owners of the different stretches of the Todd River, or did he mean that AAPA is having the discussions and relaying back to Council any decisions?
I would like to think our Town Council is a participant in any discussions with traditional owners when the discussions relate to a matter of public safety for all the residents of Alice Springs. Given the concern that the Todd River is now so shallow that a Q20 flood could break the river’s banks, I suggest these discussions would fall within the rubric of public safety.
Just asking.

Hal Duell Also Commented

No shift in council’s priorities in the river
I can’t agree that the Town Council is quite as slack and irresponsible as some would seem to suggest. While I often disagree with Council’s actions, in the case of the Todd River, I wonder what else they can do, in addition to what they are already doing, without more funds and clearer authority.
An increase in rates is never welcome, but without spending more money, how can the grasses be kept from becoming a fuel load? How can the remains of the trees burned by arsonists be removed before they add to next year’s fuel load? And how can the river’s floor be deepened, or its channels improved, so Alice is protected from a Q20 flood breaking the banks?
No one, and on my own I include the Council, wants to see the large river gums go. I suggest the inclination to protect the river is there but is being stymied by other bureaucracies. Why else is Council only allowed to enter the river with handheld tools? Rakes and a whipper snipper or two to look after the broad expanse of the Todd that Council has been given responsibility for by the NT Government? It’s almost as if someone is deliberately putting rocks in Council’s road.
The massacre of mature trees in the riverbed is down to arson, and as Mr Buxton correctly pointed out, that is not Council’s problem. The clean-up is, or could be if allowed, but the act itself is a crime and belongs to the NT Police.
Expertise can be hired. A River Warden has been suggested, but if we go down that path, I would like to see Council remain the designated authority. We have tried splitting authority in Alice before when Tangentyere Council was given authority over the Town Camps, and that just didn’t work. Splitting the Todd won’t either.
I think much of the current problem is that as a town we have turned our back on the Todd. Other than the bicycle path, the Sturt Tce. parklands and the veranda at Juicy Rump, where else is the river the focus? Even in the more than 170 activities listed in the recently released and truly admirable Youth Activities Calendar 2011/12 – summer holidays, not one activity is scheduled to take place in the Todd. Not one.


Recent Comments by Hal Duell

Aboriginal gallery: rushed business case yet immediate start?
Ah, Edan, as tantalising as a scoop neckline at the Saturday dance.


Former gallery advisor scathing about its planners
Earth Creation gone. National Indigenous Art Gallery going.
It’s possible to imagine this government’s favorite cultural event would be the unveiling of a new season’s lawnmowers.


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
It could be argued that Central Australia already has its own government. I refer to the Central Land Council. It’s not so much what they do as it is how they regulate what others do.
And then there’s the almost mythical Centre Corp, who not too many years ago managed to stonewall a Senate Inquiry, or whatever it was called.
It takes some refined legal advice to pull that off.
I wonder what the new NT ICAC will be looking at?


80% of seniors want “return to legalised assisted dying”
Keep pushing. This is an idea whose time will come.


Lambley says Gunner won’t discuss rising crime
As has been said before, we are a town of locked gates, high fences and snarling dogs.
If I were moving into a new home and learned that I would have to make all the big and little safety improvements I have made over the years around my current home, I probably wouldn’t go there.
We spruik ourselves as a welcoming tourist town, and in our dreams we are.


Be Sociable, Share!