Thanks, Jason. Can’t follow the logic of your comment about …

Comment on How the new counting system may give us a more diverse town council by Russell Guy.

Thanks, Jason. Can’t follow the logic of your comment about working in both Alice and Tennant Creek. I’ve been doing the same for the past 30-odd years.
I’ve never advocated Prohibition. You’ve picked that up from someone else. Let’s stick to what I am focussing on – Take-away sales free days.
There’s a heap of stats on the value of that and commentary going back weeks.
If you’d care to come up to speed on that and join the debate on take-away restrictions, I’d welcome that.

Russell Guy Also Commented

How the new counting system may give us a more diverse town council
Harold, it’s not that I’m opposed to the current Mayor, it’s more that I see the need for alcohol reform and wish that a candidate, any candidate would declare it’s necessity, given that the two pubs sell take-away 7 days per week, etc.
The alternative is economic madness and of course, there’s the inconvenient human toll. We know who’s overly represented there. I trust you’ve seen the figures in “Central Australia is perishing for a drink” (Google AS News Archive).
The Town Council can request that the NT Liquor Commission hold a hearing, but community-based support would be nice. The council is the local body that should stand up for the town – to coin a popular election phrase – but the fact that it doesn’t appear to be on the radar or at least, as some candidates seem to be saying, in the too hard basket, is what concerns me.
I’ve been around long enough to lose lots of Centralian friends to alcohol abuse and I miss them. It would bother me to have to lose more, not to mention their children, including those in the womb. So, it’s really a question of whether the town is interested, isn’t it?


How the new counting system may give us a more diverse town council
Jason, when you get Steve or Eli talking about the positive benefits (or the negatives if they can find any) of take-way alcohol sales free days, you’ll get my appreciation for more than taking an interest in this matter.
This is the hardest of the hard issues you talk about with a direct correlation to youth welfare. You may be aware that Steve and Eli have dodged the excessive alcohol consumption issue which numerous and widely-collected statistics reveal as unacceptable economically or in lives lost by enslavement to a legal drug.
As a youth worker, you might at least acquaint yourself with the stats (see “Central Australia is perishing for a drink”).


How the new counting system may give us a more diverse town council
Don’t be fooled by Steve Brown’s rhetoric. He is on record as being in favour of winding back current alcohol restrictions. He has no solution to public alcoholism, apart from law and order. Eli Melky has similar views, involving a curfew.
The liquor commission initiated withdrawal of cheap cask wine over the weekend is an acknowledgement that further restrictions are needed. Steve Brown et al prosper at the expense of creating welfare necessity through their vision which creates excessive alcohol consumption and related harm.
I’ve given the figures for this in my article “Central Australia is perishing for a drink.” Those figures reveal how each NT adult is taxed $4200 p.a. plus the cost of services, for the privilege of voting Brown Town prosperity.
Take-away alcohol free days, a proven measure in combating alcohol-related harm, is not on their agenda. It’s more of the same waste of taxpayers money while they reap a harvest at the expense of alcoholics.
The trend in alcohol reform is towards cost recovery at the supply end. Steve Brown and his policies are economically redundant and this from the bloke who wants to “fight like hell” to take the town forward.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
@ My Opinion, posted 20.2.18. 12:22pm:
I’m an amateur historian, but there’s an argument that the geo-political climate that caused Great Britain to raise the Union Jack over what became the colonies turned out to Australia’s advantage. At least, wisdom in hindsight suggests it so.
Indigenous or First Nations people suffered beyond measure and today assert a form of sovereignty through a limited Native Title that is not altogether historically retroactive, leading to social issues bundled together under slogans such as Closing the Gap.
There is always a relative unity among all peoples constituting a nation, but what seems undeniable is that united we stand, divided we fall.
Councils around the country fly the Aboriginal flag, but not, it seems, all that often from military sites, which still serve to unite a country in a geo-political sense, most often concerned with sovereign borders.
The social problems remain, so do other strategic sites from which the Aboriginal flag can be flown as a symbol of unity within the Alice community.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Surprised. Posted 6/2/18. 7:40AM. Re your comment about costs related to harmful levels of alcohol consumption within NT communities:
“You know, they fail to take into account that currently we pay $50m in the Territory in relation to alcohol sales in taxes. That money unfortunately goes straight to the Commonwealth so there is some arguments there how the Territory Government gets that money back” (Des Crowe, CEO. NT branch of the Australian Hotels Association. ABC 6/2/18, responding to the NT Police Association call for industry responsibility).
This appears to be a game of “pass the buck” with Liquor Inspectors and “new technology” attached to the BDR as a “way forward.”
Smoking in public places is banned and the health warnings that now appear on tobacco products have helped create a greater awareness of the issues related to the peer enforcement of smoking, but the tobacco industry didn’t go quietly.
Perhaps, the alcohol industry needs to admit responsibility and leadership by comparing the costs to public health for its products, but that would affect the corporate bottom line.
The $50m in taxes is miniscule in comparison to the billions spent on alcohol-related health issues that taxpayers subsidise on an annual basis.
That money could well be spent elsewhere.
It’s not an economic issue, but one of leadership in community values and political will.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Laurence, posted February 3, 2018. 6:17pm: Re your comment about a “radical rethink”.
Leaving aside the suite of measures so far employed to address the harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT and notwithstanding the absence of a floor price, there is something in what you say.
Stewardship is an old fashioned word for community values.
In the 1920s, Rev. John Flynn, who knew something about the health of people in the bush, wrote that we would have to render an account one day.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
There is a groundswell of awareness about the use of methamphetamine (Ice) at a community level throughout Australia.
Most people seem to have direct or anecdotal experience of families being tragically affected, but if it was better understood that ‘for every person who uses methamphetamine in a year there are 85 drinking alcohol;for every person addicted to methamphetamine there are 20 addicted to alcohol;for every ambulance call-out for methamphetamine problems there are 25 for alcohol;for every methamphetamine presentation to an Emergency Department there are 30 for alcohol;for every amphetamine-related death there are 65 alcohol deaths’ (source: Emeritus Professor Ian Webster, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education newsletter 2/2/18), the alcohol problem confronting communities in the NT might be considered more seriously.


THE TROLL by Blair McFarland
Thanks for this, Blair. As Monty Python would have it, say no more.


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