Hal, I can understand you, and no doubt, many others …

Comment on Memo Club suspends trading, goes into voluntary administration. Town & Country to close tomorrow. by Russell Guy.

Hal, I can understand you, and no doubt, many others wanting to get off the alcohol debate. It’s been with us seven days a week for so long and we’re all tired of it. Your post reinforces that fact, but it won’t go away with just one day of take-away restriction. Try three, like some others are now proposing. The alternative is not worth imagining.
Naturally occurring urban drift is exacerbated by lack of housing which is a huge issue, as in other parts of the world with the same problem. I haven’t heard any election candidate acknowledge housing, apart from John Reid who seems to be showing leadership in his policy statements around this issue.
In regard to the feral children, it’s my opinion that this can be attributed to the tragedy of alcoholism in their immediate and extended family, indeed, the disease is endemic after fifty years in Aboriginal societies. The breakdown is well documented. I’ve been saying this for weeks in these posts.
I know an Anmatjerre boy of six, who calls my name and when he sees me all he says is “book,” because I’ve given him two. His father has been absent for the past three months in prison, for alcohol-related offences.
This nice little boy lacks discipline and is distracted. I’m concerned for his schooling and future. If he were my boy, or your boy, wouldn’t you be angry about his chances under the circumstances described above?
Your comments about the Gold Coast, Sydney’s west and the Top End are well founded. Australia has an escalating excessive alcohol supply problem costing taxpayers $15billion a year (NAAA. 3/12). Add Byron Bay to your list.
I helped a friend whose business is emptying wheelie bins from holiday lettings there over Christmas. Bin after wheelie bin, seven days a week for two weeks, full of bottles of all description, beer, spirits, champagne. You would think that maybe Alice has a chance to avoid this.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Memo Club suspends trading, goes into voluntary administration. Town & Country to close tomorrow.
Dear John Barnes, I’m not an advisor to any government, simply a citizen concerned with the over-representation of alcohol outlets – pubs, clubs and take-aways – that has gutted a town in which I decided to live in 1977.
Like Domenico Peocrari, I share Bob Durnan’s concerns. A boutique wine bar with gourmet tapas, though not my cup of tea, may sound like a nice attraction to the CBD next to what is more often a public courtyard grog shanty by day, but why is grog seen as sacrosanct when it comes to business survival?
The number of art galleries that have gone bust is not because of violence-related crime. They’ve shut their doors for other reasons – the GFC’s effect on discretionary income, the high $A effect on overseas visitors, surely you’d agree that this has some effect on businesses such as Town and Country and Sporties. The Memo has different reasons, many of which have been elaborated in postings at this site.
Law and order candidates’ exclusion of excessive alcohol supply as a perpetrator of crime is its own conspiracy against all the evidence presented by numerous individuals in all walks of life, before, during and after this election campaign if the community lets them get away with it at the polling booth.
Domenico’s view that tourism can be stimulated by a take-away restriction regime is only one of the real economic benefits which they are missing.


Memo Club suspends trading, goes into voluntary administration. Town & Country to close tomorrow.
Kevin, you stand afar and hurl lightning bolts like Jove, when praying to Jehovah would be more your calling.
The last thing we need is a know-it all, itinerant preacher taking up a seat in the grandstand.
If you want to front the situation in Alice, then rock-up and get your hands dirty, but consider reading related posts from the past weeks of this debate.
In your enthusiasm to direct traffic, you miss the whole point of a take-away restriction on excessive supply.


Memo Club suspends trading, goes into voluntary administration. Town & Country to close tomorrow.
Dear Anon Glad to be out of here, according to you, we turn out the light. Why don’t you sign your name?
How many times do I have to say it? Take-Away Alcohol Free Sales Days have never been tried here. It worked in Tennant (read the stats), etc., etc. End of argument if you can’t see it or don’t want to see it, nothing more to say.
The Banned Drinking Register is a step in the right direction and from where I live, it’s having an effect. People are volunteering to be on it. It’s another measure in the multi-pronged approach that the West Australians are trying at present to contain their part of the escalating national grog problem.
I’m not looking at all this through a crystal ball, but through 30-plus years of working and at times, living in NT Town Camps. This is an epidemic, there are some who will welcome any help they can get in trying to manage alcoholism (see CAAC stats – better still ring them up, or go and have a look at their daily clinic).
As for your comments, Steve Brown. Your “moron” remark is a new low for a debate in which you have nothing more to offer. I’ve been to the Memo. You’re not telling me anything new.
In fact, everything you suggest is old hat, done and dusted. Like many of the newcomers to this Council election, I’m interested in the future, not the past and working with government policies such as Stronger Futures because they’re moving away from the Grog Culture which your law and order policies will drive underground. Alex Nelson said in the Advocate (20/3/12) that you’ve done nothing to change the culture of grog in the past 25 years.
Anonymous, Steve, the one-trick pony man. Have the courage to sign your name and I’d take you more seriously. I’ve written about bootlegging/black marketeering, if you’d care to look through recent posts at Alice Springs News Online.
I see grog running all the time and co-operate with police when they have the time to follow-up, that is, when they’re not run off their feet trying to keep up with the effects of excessive alcohol supply that a take-away restriction will assist, in another step in the right direction. Thanks for the reading reference re prohibition. Been there, not advocating it anyway.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
@ My Opinion, posted 20.2.18. 12:22pm:
I’m an amateur historian, but there’s an argument that the geo-political climate that caused Great Britain to raise the Union Jack over what became the colonies turned out to Australia’s advantage. At least, wisdom in hindsight suggests it so.
Indigenous or First Nations people suffered beyond measure and today assert a form of sovereignty through a limited Native Title that is not altogether historically retroactive, leading to social issues bundled together under slogans such as Closing the Gap.
There is always a relative unity among all peoples constituting a nation, but what seems undeniable is that united we stand, divided we fall.
Councils around the country fly the Aboriginal flag, but not, it seems, all that often from military sites, which still serve to unite a country in a geo-political sense, most often concerned with sovereign borders.
The social problems remain, so do other strategic sites from which the Aboriginal flag can be flown as a symbol of unity within the Alice community.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Surprised. Posted 6/2/18. 7:40AM. Re your comment about costs related to harmful levels of alcohol consumption within NT communities:
“You know, they fail to take into account that currently we pay $50m in the Territory in relation to alcohol sales in taxes. That money unfortunately goes straight to the Commonwealth so there is some arguments there how the Territory Government gets that money back” (Des Crowe, CEO. NT branch of the Australian Hotels Association. ABC 6/2/18, responding to the NT Police Association call for industry responsibility).
This appears to be a game of “pass the buck” with Liquor Inspectors and “new technology” attached to the BDR as a “way forward.”
Smoking in public places is banned and the health warnings that now appear on tobacco products have helped create a greater awareness of the issues related to the peer enforcement of smoking, but the tobacco industry didn’t go quietly.
Perhaps, the alcohol industry needs to admit responsibility and leadership by comparing the costs to public health for its products, but that would affect the corporate bottom line.
The $50m in taxes is miniscule in comparison to the billions spent on alcohol-related health issues that taxpayers subsidise on an annual basis.
That money could well be spent elsewhere.
It’s not an economic issue, but one of leadership in community values and political will.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Laurence, posted February 3, 2018. 6:17pm: Re your comment about a “radical rethink”.
Leaving aside the suite of measures so far employed to address the harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT and notwithstanding the absence of a floor price, there is something in what you say.
Stewardship is an old fashioned word for community values.
In the 1920s, Rev. John Flynn, who knew something about the health of people in the bush, wrote that we would have to render an account one day.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
There is a groundswell of awareness about the use of methamphetamine (Ice) at a community level throughout Australia.
Most people seem to have direct or anecdotal experience of families being tragically affected, but if it was better understood that ‘for every person who uses methamphetamine in a year there are 85 drinking alcohol;for every person addicted to methamphetamine there are 20 addicted to alcohol;for every ambulance call-out for methamphetamine problems there are 25 for alcohol;for every methamphetamine presentation to an Emergency Department there are 30 for alcohol;for every amphetamine-related death there are 65 alcohol deaths’ (source: Emeritus Professor Ian Webster, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education newsletter 2/2/18), the alcohol problem confronting communities in the NT might be considered more seriously.


THE TROLL by Blair McFarland
Thanks for this, Blair. As Monty Python would have it, say no more.


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