To clarify my comments about those whom I said come …

Comment on Council poll: Law & order candidates and alcohol restriction opponents top councillor poll, could threaten Mayor by Russell Guy.

To clarify my comments about those whom I said come from all levels of society and suffer from alcoholism in Alice Springs, it’s no shame to be addicted to this disease which is endemic to our society. There is help available in this community, many of whom do care and acknowledging that you have this addiction and need help is, of course, the classic AA approach to healing.
The shame is that this town is living in denial that it has a serious alcohol problem, statistically recognised as twice the national average, yet it was barely considered an issue by candidates representing the people in the local government election.
Despite having so many alcohol outlets, universally recognised means of avoiding the problems that Alice has with related crime and health issues are cause for such divided opinion.
Organisations like PAAC are lambasted, when they should be applauded for trying to bring some order into an alcohol-fuelled chaos that operates seven days a week.
It’s not as if they’re commentating from a vacuum as more than a few of their members are dealing with the fall-out on a daily basis in their professional lives as am I. Others castigate the NT Liquor Commission for being “weak.” Some say reinstate the “Living With Alcohol” program, but avoid the issue of restricting the excessive supply. Meanwhile, those who attempt to placate their addiction in public are considered to be a problem, rather than a victim.
My point is that my friend who is a church elder and an alcoholic is not alone in his struggle, but I know his despair is more keenly felt because this wide-spread insidious evil is considered normal.
The ASTC candidates who said “show me a solution,” or “I need to be persuaded” and worse, those who see no need for further restriction on a seven day per week supply schedule, leaving many voters confused, have been diminished by one independent candidate whose How to Vote card showed a last minute change by stating that he was prepared to take a tough stance on alcohol if elected. He won’t be, but he’s a hero in my eyes.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Council poll: Law & order candidates and alcohol restriction opponents top councillor poll, could threaten Mayor
My sincere apologies to Steve Brown for attributing the post that I responded to below as his.
While the AS News has a policy on recommending full names, I’ve said it to you before Anonymous Steve, get out your driver’s licence, if you have one, or some other form of identity and have the courage to declare your citizenship.
You may take the post attributed to Mr Brown as inferring that you lack moral courage on several counts.


Council poll: Law & order candidates and alcohol restriction opponents top councillor poll, could threaten Mayor
There’s a case for the blind leading the blind, Steve and I’m not the first to make it.
A reasonable person wouldn’t see my comments as “lashing out.” David Cameron has said, government “is not always about doing what is popular, but what is right.” With the same kinds of problems, you are unable to make that distinction.
I merely present a case, whereas you overstate yours. Totalitarian dictators suffer the same affliction and from that basis, it will be interesting to observe your performance in the chamber, should you make it.
British PM, David Cameron has used an evidence based platform to back his courageous stance against enslaving legislation and intends to amend it. The trade in human souls was handled the same way, thanks largely, to Wilbur Wilbeforce in the British Parliament, repealing or reforming legislation which was perceived to be working against the inclusion of humanity.
I know a church elder in this town who is an alcoholic, not that it gives me any greater claim to social skill than you, but it does reveal you as a man who thinks only he knows this town.
On March 16 @ 6.08pm, you wrote, “there are few if any that have my overall broad brush of experience, practical expertise, history of association and general knowledge of Alice Springs, what makes it tick, and more importantly what could make it tick a lot better.”
Obviously, a man so poorly acquainted with statistics, is making such a claim in ignorance of who constitutes “the few”. Not that I expect this to make any restraining impression, but I’m not fooled by your mandate.
As a conservative politician, David Cameron has at least seen the light in reducing alcohol-related crime by further restriction, not just by law and order.


Council poll: Law & order candidates and alcohol restriction opponents top councillor poll, could threaten Mayor
Just because one is considered to be “a responsible drinker” doesn’t mean that they’re not an alcoholic. In fact, many reading this would agree. I know such people and was one myself.
An interpretation of early voting trends in the Alice Council elections is that those who supported law and order, anti-current and future restrictions on the seven days per week supply of alcohol, were not likely to give up their addiction so that the community could address the situation with a sober mind.
More especially when “responsbible” alcohol consumption exists at all levels of our community – in church elders, councillors, political leaders, Mums, Dads, business and binge drinkers of all ages.
Recent conservatively estimated claims that Australians face an escalating $15billion p.a. cost of alcohol abuse, are evidence that alcoholism is entrenched at epidemic levels, but the NT is way out in front of the national average.
However, if a conservative government in the UK can introduce a floor price, there’s hope that Australia might wake up to itself and applaud such initiatives of good governance.
Prime Minister David Cameron, has said that the United Kingdom couldn’t go on like this. One day, sufficient Australians may come to the same realisation and demand the same. Perhaps.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

NT-SA agreement hardly historic
Paul Keating, in his 1992 Redfern Speech, framed by speechwriter Don Watson, author of the somewhat dryly punitive opus, The Bush, also claimed a historic mandate, announcing success for Reconciliation “within the next decade.”
It’s in the nature of politics to claim credit for doing something, mostly spending tax revenue and living in hope that it won’t run out.
In my opinion, the “historic” issue is just a beat up or a sop.
Pass me another piece of Bicenttennial birthday cake, please.


Greens on Pine Gap: Move towards non-aligned foreign policy
The Greens, once declared an “alternative” political party, inherited the structural social and cultural goalposts, but they keep trying to kick goals through them.
Kinselas’s, one of Sydney’s long established pubs, was recently sold through the Sunsuper-backed Australian Pub Fund for $22m.
It was purchased in 2010 for $10m, but it’s been said that it would have gone for $40m had the NSW government’s lock-out laws not been enacted.
Senator Di Natale obviously supports other supply-reduction measures, but dealing with the structural wealth of Super funds and their investment in the alcohol industry is a bit more difficult than continuing to bang the party political donation route to government corruption.
It would be nice if politicians who eschew liberal social policy when it suits them, could tackle financial regulation through institutionalised investment in the alcohol industry.


They must be joking!
@ Charlie Carter. Sense is subjective. Some people laugh when others don’t and vice versa. Cheers.


They must be joking!
From reading these comments over a number of years, there are a lot of disgruntled people who have moved to Alice Springs in recent times, who appear to want the place to conform to their aspirations.
They talk about “remote” and “communities” in the abstract.
They have no idea of Mbantua.
They want what they think life should offer, according to what they read in the glossy inserts or la dolce vita on television.
When the lights go out and it’s time to cook dinner on an open fire, what then, ye dreaming?


What the open letter didn’t say
End-of-day performances by the many local musicians, occurring in the Mall is a great idea for so many obvious reasons.
I did this numerous times in the 1980s with musos and it’s not that difficult with a small PA system.
It creates paid work and gives a sense of cultural belonging that cannot really be created by other art forms.
Music speaks all languages. We had occasional problems with intoxicated persons, but violence was extremely rare.
I urge the council to look at this again, especially where inner-city gentrification is forcing musicians out and replacing “live” entertainment with grog shanties. Goodness, people might start dancing again.


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