I remember back in the 80s when I was at …

Comment on Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered. by Ray.

I remember back in the 80s when I was at the Sunshine Coast for a sporting event. It was school holidays and there were no vacancies in any of the motels that we could afford, so we decided to sleep in the car. We were woken by the police and told in no uncertain terms that we could not sleep in our car on the esplanade, and were promptly moved on.
Even two years ago when I was on the Gold Coast for holidays there are red and white signs everywhere stating that sleeping in public (even in your car) was illegal.
It still amazes me that here in Alice Springs it is tolerated (effectively permitted), in the river and in many of the crown land reserves around town.
It does not take a lot to spot them, the rising smoke from their campfire or ramshackle tents are a giveaway.
Where do they shower or go to the toilet? Why do we allow children to be brought up like this?
If there are not enough rangers, employ more, at a higher pay rate if necessary. Stagger their starting times, and back them up when they enforce the by-laws. To those who say it will just move the problem somewhere else, my response is, good, that means it is not here.

Ray Also Commented

Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@Russell “The savings to society, already evident in recidivist statistical data, includes health, policing, court and prison costs, leading to positive future benefits like full-time employment.”
Already evident?? No Russell, crime is so high the police commissioner has been asked by the CM to personally get involved and fix the problem. The Berrimah and Alice Springs prisons are at bursting point, and the number of juveniles in detention are staggering, (the next generation). You are of course right Russell when you question my beliefs when I say I don’t give a S#%t, I really do, but do you really think these habitual drunks care about going to jail or losing their licence? It’s not like they are worried about where their next pay cheque is coming from, or how they are going to pay rent. I asked an old Aboriginal chap recently “why do these kids think they can keep breaking the law?” and was told “they don’t give a f&ck about the your law, they’ll get caught and get to spend time with family”.
Remember the old days when if a kid got brought home by the local sergeant? He’d be more scared about the hiding he’d get from his dad. Nowadays, the father would drag the kid straight to a lawyer to defend him against that “horrible white racist copper bastard”.
Drinking is not the cause of this society, is it a symptom. Unless we look at making all people (ie all races / all Australians) obey the same set of laws that have been developed over centuries, for a civilised society, the next generation will suffer the same fate. We have seen the gently gently approach tried and failed over many many years. As I’ve said previously, I love the concept of social inclusion, but if people want respect and not resentment, they need to understand they have to take responsibility for themselves, and their children.
If you banned driving for one day every week, I am sure you would make a massive difference to the road toll, and you could make a valid point with those stats as well.
Thanks for the discussion though, it has been enjoyable.


Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@Russell. I get pretty sick and tired of being the one that has to make the sacrifice because of all the others who refuse to take responsibility for themselves. If they can’t abide by the rules of this society, go somewhere else. I see no reason I can’t enjoy the right to buy alcohol and drink it responsibly, like I can do in any similarly sized town in this country. All I ever hear from the huggers is that alcohol is evil, and we have to cut our consumption to help the poor unfortunates. I greatly don’t care any more if they drink themselves into a stupor or worse, if you can’t handle the grog, don’t drink! I’ve gotten blotto many times in my youth, and moderated my behaviour as I have grown up. It’s not that hard


Female tourists sleeping in car alleged to have been sexually assaulted: all three suspects now charged, rifle still not recovered.
@2 Rod, I ride through bushland near town regularly. The amount of crap that I see dumped in and around these areas is disgusting. Filthy blankets, often caked in dried blood and shit, surrounded by tins of food, drink containers etc all swarming with flies are becoming a blight on our town. This is occurring more and more regularly. I applaud the council workers for putting their health at risk and collecting this rubbish. I have never had any of my camping gear “stolen” or taken away, because it is all cleaned, and stored in my shed behind the house that I bought from working hard. I am part of the community I choose to live in, and accept that if I want to be a part of this community I will follow by the rules they have in place. If people choose to ignore those rules and it affects my ability to enjoy a lifestyle I should be able to expect, I expect them do be dealt with according to the law / rules.


Recent Comments by Ray

On youth prisons: grandmothers, reformers, revolutionaries
@ Jameel: I really hope you are being sarcastic when you say “who are they?”
Do I really need to explain that “they” are the grandmothers that are calling for these young ones to go out bush, learn their ways and culture and be removed from town instead of being locked up. This used to be done in the 70s, when the young ones were going off the rails, they were sent to family on out stations, where they learnt their “cultural responsibilities”.
Unfortunately all these solutions are suggested when it is too late.
Only after the kids have robbed, stolen, destroyed, harassed, broken etc, and they have been to court, and sent to detention as a last resort to these so called concerned grandmothers shake their heads about what would be best for the kids.
Surely if they had these concerns, they would have sent the kids out bush when they first started getting into trouble.
With such a strong and close family bond, these grandmothers know what the kids are up to, and they certainly have family who live out bush who could take these kids for a while, like used to happen.
Unfortunately these family structures have broken down, and it is now easier to blame everybody else for their woes, because they can no longer control their own kids appalling behavior, lack of respect and willingness to use violence.


On youth prisons: grandmothers, reformers, revolutionaries
With 51% of the NT being Aboriginal land, why are they not doing this?


Helping offenders on probation and parole stay out of gaol
Wow, can anything be done these days without a fancy sounding acronym? It seems other programs have Frustrated All Involved Leading to Extended Discussions (FAILED), so let’s hope this is not just a load of Creative Repeating of yet Another Program (CRAP).


Police clash with protestors
He was too close to an arrest. It takes a number of officers to do this safely, to control the head of the subject, arms legs etc.
Police need to move around the subject quickly to ensure they are safe during the process. That photographer was too close and impeding the police officers movements as can be clearly seen in the video.
If you are told to move by police, you move. Simple.
It is not up to the public to question the way the coppers do their job.
In the “heat of battle” they do hard jobs that you and many others are not prepared to do. Do not judge them when they are doing their lawful duties. Back away, let them work. Simple.


Police clash with protestors
He was interfering with a police operation, he was told to move as they were trying to effect an arrest, he failed to do so, he was pushed away.
Remember Erwin, this is on Police Rememberance Day. Did you do a story about the Officers who have paid the ultimate price in the NT? Just in case you were wondering, I have found the details for all of them for you.
7 November 1883, Mounted Constable John Shirley, aged 27 years from dehydration while searching for men who had murdered a man at Lawson’s Creek.
1 August 1933, mounted constable Albert Stewart McColl was speared to death at Woodah Island in Arnhem Land.
17 August 1948, Constable Maxwell Gilbert, aged 27 years when the vehicle he was driving overturned just north of Wauchope. He was escorting a prisoner to Alice Springs.
9 June 1952, constable William Bryan Condon was shot twice after confronting a gunman.
16 June 1967, inspector Louis Hook died from extensive injuries from a rollover near Pine Creek.
9 June 1970, sergeant Colin Eckert was killed in a head-on collision in Katherine.
11 December 1981, senior constable Allen Price aged 44 years died of a heart attack while attempting to stop a disturbance in Mataranka.
29 January 1984, detective sergeant Ian Bradford died when the police vehicle he was a passenger in went over the edge of the wharf in Darwin.
3 August 1999, Brevet sergeant Glen Huitson was killed in a gun battle with bushman Rodney Ansell on the Stuart Highway.
[ED> – Hi Ray, thank you for commemorating the heroic police officers who gave their lives in the exercise of their duties. But as for today’s events – you are raising the subject: In what way was the photographer “interfering with a police operation”?]


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