A classic reply to the “guns don’t kill people – …

Comment on Hell or high water by Ray.

A classic reply to the “guns don’t kill people – people kill people” argument is that you never hear of a drive-by stabbing.
As for the drinking, I remember getting blotto with regular abandon as a young guy, but the massive amounts of violence was never there as much as it is now. Some young people go out on weekends and get written off for a few years, but most of them grow up and get on with work and family responsibilities as they mature, but here in particular there are many people who do not need to take responsibility as everything they want is paid for or given to them, so what else is there to do but sit around and get on the grog? I do agree with Terry to a certain extent, as I have lived in small towns with a number of pubs, clubs and alcohol licences, and have never seen the problems we have here, but then again our demographic mix was very different to Alice Springs, and those pubs sold takeaway until 10pm Monday to Sunday.

Recent Comments by Ray

Alleged toddler rape: Why she hadn’t been taken from her family
Mick Gooda “agreeing to disagree” with the former children’s commissioner (?) on the need to remove kids demonstrates he was the wrong choice for this role from the start.
His statements before it even commenced should have been reason enough for his disqualification.
His insistence that kids stay with family no matter what, and his Blind Freddie approach in believing the populist version of the stolen generation myth is an example of why this problem will continue. Justice Martin would have been a far better choice.


Bailed juveniles next-door to you soon?
@ Trevor: You have nailed it, absolutely nailed it. Unfortunately is is far more common than people think or could even imagine.


Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
To those who voted against it, thank you. I for one believe that the Australian flag up there and Territory one next to it symbolises all Australians from the Territory that served.
Yes, Aboriginal servicemen had a hard time returning home from service, but so did our Vietnam diggers, of all races.
I suppose that change will come one day, but for the councillors that voted against it represented my point of view, so thank you, your efforts are appreciated.


Will we say sorry to the Abandoned Generation in 10 years?
It sounds like Sue Gordon is getting it and is not afraid to say it how it is.
So many people on this and other forums are saying that the lock me up attitude of the last 20 years is proof that a punitive approach is not working, and we need to change to a more caring model.
Well, here is your evidence of how this new system will work for us. Once the town has died completely and it turns into a service centre only, then people on the east or west coast will say, sadly, “told you so”.
While we keep getting told an entire generation was stolen because of the colour of their skin, and feeling sorry for anybody simply because they said they were stolen too, there will be no solution, but great profits for Harvey Norman and the local bottle shops.
People hopefully will begin to see the point of magistrate Gordon, that a child living in care is better than a child dead with “family”.


Bailed juveniles next-door to you soon?
@ Alex: Not sure what evidence you are referring to about alternatives in other countries working. I have tried to find comparatives to our situation, and could not, and our society is vastly different to these countries.
My other point is when you say that what we have done over the last 20 years has not worked.
How can that be proven? In another 20 years, we may look back at this new approach and compare it to what we have been doing, and find it has been more successful, but then again it may fail miserably.
Unless we get to a point where we have two choices to compare, it is hard to outright dismiss what has been done over the last 20 years or so.


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