You make some good points, Paul. I checked out that …

Comment on Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon by Russell Guy.

You make some good points, Paul. I checked out that link and read Alison Andersen’s account of her childhood at Papunya prior to the 1970s “when things started going backwards.”
It’s interesting to compare her comments in the article by Kieran with her approbation of the missionaries and later in Christian-based schools like Yirara, St Phillips and Kormilda.
It was around that time that governments began returning Mission control to local Aboriginal Councils and many missionaries left, with some being asked to leave. Wet canteens came in at the same time.
My book on the Daintree Aboriginal Mission, BAPTISED AMONG CROCODILES 1940-1962 (1999) formed the core of my post-graduate thesis and study of Christian Missions to Aboriginal people.
Alison’s comments are largely similar to what I discovered was the general case, though, of course, much depended on the personality of the missionaries and there were mistakes, acknowledged or not. There are many books published on the subject which was overall a positive experience and is, to this day, a learning curve for those missionaries who are still in the field, but rewarding for both parties if the right balance is struck.
The old virtues of tolerance, acceptance, understanding, love for and compassion seem to be as fashionable as they were then.
As Alison says, “Where to from here?” When you consider how polarised are the alcohol-policies of the two political parties in the forthcoming NT election and the amount of material written about grog-abuse in the Alice Springs News Online alone during the past six months, you’ve got to wonder.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
Paul Parker @ 24 July. 11: 59PM. Your comment relating to “‘hunter-gatherer’, ‘post-cultivator’ and ‘post-indsutrialized’ modern suburban cultures” leaves it up in the clear air over Alice Springs without qualifying it as to what may be done.
Your comment regarding “Welfare / Centrelink / Rights” follows-on with a correct understanding that most (Indigenous) recipients do not fully understand the Centrelink agreements that they are required to sign.
I suggest that this is more to do with their different cultural and educational background, often where English is not a first language, than the present urgent need for Centrelink to reform its programs with a focus on job creation outcomes.
As for your take on the history of the cattle station and Equal Rights process during the 1970s, I suggest you do a little reading of books written by those NT cattlemen involved, e.g., DRY RIVER (Rachel Percy. 2012. Hesperian Press. W.A.), the latest in a long line of such anecdotal evidence.
Finally, your comments on alcohol seem to agree that “alcohol supply laws relate to over-consumption”. I rest my case. Still waiting for a reply, Janet.


Thanks for more ‘us and them’, Ms Macklin and Mr Snowdon
Janet @ July 23rd. 9″ 02AM. You confuse Native Title with “Paternalism”. The poor health statistics associated with Indigenous peoples in relation to the rest of the population are directly related to long-term psychological stress incurred with “equality under the law” and the demise of cultural difference, centered around a relationship to the land which was allowed to co-exist on cattle stations before Equal Rights forced them into welfare.
Entwined with this is recognition by many Indigenous women that alcohol supply laws in the NT are injurious to their health and that of their children.
You hide behind the law with your Law and Order solution for alcohol-abuse and have failed to answer a question I put to you recently in these posts in relation to the growing evidence that Australia has a problem with alcohol-related violence.
Southern states are restricting supply access, but you are politically aligned with the NT Country Liberals whose policy is to deny that alcohol supply is a problem. I asked if you’d reviewed your paternalistic position.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Town still upset with Stuart statue, say researchers
I’ve not come across the term “creative arts therapist” before, but as a writer, it suggests that artists and in this case, the sculptor need therapy in order to heal, not just ourselves, but the culture within which we live.
I’ve heard of cultural amnesia, but not cultural healing, although, perhaps, this is what the Reconciliation movement has been attempting and, I guess, those in the aftermath of war, once the dust clears and what’s left is assayed.
This seems to be a definition of what is meant here.
Ironically, an “appreciation of arid landscape” noted by the analysts, came about because of the Stuart Highway and without the statue which has the “town upset”, this exhibition may not have happened.
In this paradox, difference is celebrated, but given that all difference is equal, some people don’t appear to mind. Perhaps, they have cultural amnesia or some other malaise.


Hermannsburg historic precinct gets cash injection
With thanks to the pioneering Lutheran Missionaries whose venture of faith during the 1880s was a hard slog and is well-recorded.
Their Christian concern for the Arrernte underpins our tourist industry at a time when such religious freedom as allowed their Mission Station to implement employment and educational training programs are not considered significant by a large portion of our population, including the majority of politicians.


Emirates jetliner dumps fuel on Central Australia
I believe the Galaxy is short field take off / landing as opposed to the Airbus / Boeing Emirates type which may make the comparison inequitable.
Just saying and stand correcting, but the Alice is well known as an emergency field for long-haul flights, so weight is an issue. Since the port of departure is some hours north, fuel load could still have been critical.


Outback Way to get more bitumen
There goes the neighbourhood.


NT-SA agreement hardly historic
Paul Keating, in his 1992 Redfern Speech, framed by speechwriter Don Watson, author of the somewhat dryly punitive opus, The Bush, also claimed a historic mandate, announcing success for Reconciliation “within the next decade.”
It’s in the nature of politics to claim credit for doing something, mostly spending tax revenue and living in hope that it won’t run out.
In my opinion, the “historic” issue is just a beat up or a sop.
Pass me another piece of Bicenttennial birthday cake, please.


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