Janet @ August 7. It is liquor that makes alcoholics. …

Comment on Alcohol sales in Alice dropped 12% between 2004 and 2011, but mail orders, online purchases not included by Russell Guy.

Janet @ August 7. It is liquor that makes alcoholics. Your stated supply seems to qualify. The fewer alcoholics in Alice, the more productivity likely. It’s your economic formula that requires attention, not NT Labor.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Alcohol sales in Alice dropped 12% between 2004 and 2011, but mail orders, online purchases not included
It appears that this decline in cheap wine is attributed to the voluntary accord on a floor price raising the cost of a standard drink in Alice Springs, while the NT News editorial yesterday reported a small decline in the number of cartons of beer sold in the NT.
Apart from the good news regarding evidence of a floor price as sound alcohol management policy, neither of the two NT parties have announced that they will follow the UK, Scotland, Ireland and New Zealand in moving closer to this. It would seem a good opportunity in responsible government for either, if not both, NT parties to announce their intention to do this in the run-up to the election.

Lest some readers think that the alcohol industry will take this laying down, they might be interested to learn that the first report of the Alcohol Advertising Review Board has just been released in which it investigated numerous public complaints into products like ‘Woodstock Bourbon Calendar Babes’, ‘Skinnygirl Cocktails’, ‘Pom Pom’ and ‘Electric Pink,’ Jim Beam and Jack Daniels’ sponsorship of V8 Supercars, Smirnoff Vodka’s sponsorship of ‘Groovin’ the Moo’ music festival and ‘Jim Beam on Campus’, all targeting young people, with inadequate warnings on their labels.
In December 2011, Australian and New Zealand Food and Health Ministers recommended that the alcohol industry be given two years to voluntarily implement alcohol warning labels, after which time the government would move to mandate pregnancy alcohol warning labels.
As Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) has been recognised by teachers in the Kimberley, WA, region as an incoming classroom issue, this is not before time.
What concerns me is that the Country Liberals appear to be intent on dismantling current alcohol supply restrictions in the NT. A proven floor price supply restriction and FASD do not seem to be of concern to Terry Mills in his management plan. Correct me if I’m wrong, Terry.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
@ My Opinion, posted 20.2.18. 12:22pm:
I’m an amateur historian, but there’s an argument that the geo-political climate that caused Great Britain to raise the Union Jack over what became the colonies turned out to Australia’s advantage. At least, wisdom in hindsight suggests it so.
Indigenous or First Nations people suffered beyond measure and today assert a form of sovereignty through a limited Native Title that is not altogether historically retroactive, leading to social issues bundled together under slogans such as Closing the Gap.
There is always a relative unity among all peoples constituting a nation, but what seems undeniable is that united we stand, divided we fall.
Councils around the country fly the Aboriginal flag, but not, it seems, all that often from military sites, which still serve to unite a country in a geo-political sense, most often concerned with sovereign borders.
The social problems remain, so do other strategic sites from which the Aboriginal flag can be flown as a symbol of unity within the Alice community.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Surprised. Posted 6/2/18. 7:40AM. Re your comment about costs related to harmful levels of alcohol consumption within NT communities:
“You know, they fail to take into account that currently we pay $50m in the Territory in relation to alcohol sales in taxes. That money unfortunately goes straight to the Commonwealth so there is some arguments there how the Territory Government gets that money back” (Des Crowe, CEO. NT branch of the Australian Hotels Association. ABC 6/2/18, responding to the NT Police Association call for industry responsibility).
This appears to be a game of “pass the buck” with Liquor Inspectors and “new technology” attached to the BDR as a “way forward.”
Smoking in public places is banned and the health warnings that now appear on tobacco products have helped create a greater awareness of the issues related to the peer enforcement of smoking, but the tobacco industry didn’t go quietly.
Perhaps, the alcohol industry needs to admit responsibility and leadership by comparing the costs to public health for its products, but that would affect the corporate bottom line.
The $50m in taxes is miniscule in comparison to the billions spent on alcohol-related health issues that taxpayers subsidise on an annual basis.
That money could well be spent elsewhere.
It’s not an economic issue, but one of leadership in community values and political will.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Laurence, posted February 3, 2018. 6:17pm: Re your comment about a “radical rethink”.
Leaving aside the suite of measures so far employed to address the harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT and notwithstanding the absence of a floor price, there is something in what you say.
Stewardship is an old fashioned word for community values.
In the 1920s, Rev. John Flynn, who knew something about the health of people in the bush, wrote that we would have to render an account one day.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
There is a groundswell of awareness about the use of methamphetamine (Ice) at a community level throughout Australia.
Most people seem to have direct or anecdotal experience of families being tragically affected, but if it was better understood that ‘for every person who uses methamphetamine in a year there are 85 drinking alcohol;for every person addicted to methamphetamine there are 20 addicted to alcohol;for every ambulance call-out for methamphetamine problems there are 25 for alcohol;for every methamphetamine presentation to an Emergency Department there are 30 for alcohol;for every amphetamine-related death there are 65 alcohol deaths’ (source: Emeritus Professor Ian Webster, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education newsletter 2/2/18), the alcohol problem confronting communities in the NT might be considered more seriously.


THE TROLL by Blair McFarland
Thanks for this, Blair. As Monty Python would have it, say no more.


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