Janet @ August 7. It is liquor that makes alcoholics. …

Comment on Alcohol sales in Alice dropped 12% between 2004 and 2011, but mail orders, online purchases not included by Russell Guy.

Janet @ August 7. It is liquor that makes alcoholics. Your stated supply seems to qualify. The fewer alcoholics in Alice, the more productivity likely. It’s your economic formula that requires attention, not NT Labor.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Alcohol sales in Alice dropped 12% between 2004 and 2011, but mail orders, online purchases not included
It appears that this decline in cheap wine is attributed to the voluntary accord on a floor price raising the cost of a standard drink in Alice Springs, while the NT News editorial yesterday reported a small decline in the number of cartons of beer sold in the NT.
Apart from the good news regarding evidence of a floor price as sound alcohol management policy, neither of the two NT parties have announced that they will follow the UK, Scotland, Ireland and New Zealand in moving closer to this. It would seem a good opportunity in responsible government for either, if not both, NT parties to announce their intention to do this in the run-up to the election.

Lest some readers think that the alcohol industry will take this laying down, they might be interested to learn that the first report of the Alcohol Advertising Review Board has just been released in which it investigated numerous public complaints into products like ‘Woodstock Bourbon Calendar Babes’, ‘Skinnygirl Cocktails’, ‘Pom Pom’ and ‘Electric Pink,’ Jim Beam and Jack Daniels’ sponsorship of V8 Supercars, Smirnoff Vodka’s sponsorship of ‘Groovin’ the Moo’ music festival and ‘Jim Beam on Campus’, all targeting young people, with inadequate warnings on their labels.
In December 2011, Australian and New Zealand Food and Health Ministers recommended that the alcohol industry be given two years to voluntarily implement alcohol warning labels, after which time the government would move to mandate pregnancy alcohol warning labels.
As Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) has been recognised by teachers in the Kimberley, WA, region as an incoming classroom issue, this is not before time.
What concerns me is that the Country Liberals appear to be intent on dismantling current alcohol supply restrictions in the NT. A proven floor price supply restriction and FASD do not seem to be of concern to Terry Mills in his management plan. Correct me if I’m wrong, Terry.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

National Aboriginal gallery: Town Council’s action clear as mud
I took the Victoria Hotel tour in Goondiwindi recently, led by an eighty year old local who said that much of the old town had been knocked down by “multinationals” who didn’t care about its heritage.
“They just threw the old tin on the back of a truck and took it to the tip,” he said.
I stayed at the Victoria around 1990 as a break from the swag. It was a grand old building with a main street verandah in the Australian tradition, but fell into disrepair until a few years ago when the Council colluded with a local to bring it back.
Because of the memories, I took the tour, but the town hardly resembled the way it was 30 years ago. Kinda lost its soul. Grows cotton now for export to China mostly, where they make the clothes and ship ém back.
It’s easy to understand how multinationals and mall makers can knock heritage down, but not so easy when your own government does it.
There’s a plaque on a rock near Anzac Oval dedicated to George Wilkinson who managed Wallis Fogarty’s store in Alice in the early days.
If you look carefully, you can see lots of heritage around there.
Beats me why the NAAG can’t be build somewhere else.
The CBD is chockers as it is, whether functioning or not. This is a country town like Goondiwindi, not Las Vegas, yet.
It’s easy to lose a town’s soul, if you’re not careful.


Nanny state: Tennant alcohol restrictions for Alice?
The NT Government released a press release on September 3 announcing that it was inquiring into takeaway liquor licensing regulations in the Alice Springs region after conducting an inquiry in the Barkly.
Reducing harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT is not “going to send people packing”.
On the contrary, I suggest that it will increase the quality of life for everyone.
The problem is easy access to alcohol and takeaway has been the biggest culprit for decades.
There is no silver bullet: The BDR and a Floor Price are part of the goal of reducing the amount of excessive alcohol consumed and the cost to the public across many portfolios, including tourism, which suggests that a figure of 99% responsible consumers is inflated.
If 1% of the population can do so much damage, and it is a generational trauma, then the status quo needs changing.
Lulling people into complacency and allowing the alcohol industry to self-regulate while alcohol-related trauma continues is irresponsible.
A nanny state would do nothing about it.
Intervention is necessary.


SA budget allocation may put paid to Alice gallery: Higgins
@ Albert Diano: Thanks for your engagement, Albert.
I encouraged “Local Centralian” to engage with Alex Nelson’s post because Alex is making a similar point to yours.
I have made the point that nurturing and encouraging (financially) the jewels of community museums and other galleries in Alice is part of establishing a stable tourist economy, with benefits for the CBD and visitation accommodation alternatives for the growing Baby Boomer domestic market, versus the high end air fares on which the government’s proposal is based.
I suggest that more cross-engagement with thematic posting would be useful in debating the points made, with thanks to the Editor for his patronage.


Gallery: national reference group appointed
@ Local1. It’s called a thematic funding window or bucket of money in the vernacular.
In Mexico, photographic exhibitions are combined with music. How revolutionary! Should be exported to the colonies.


Gallery: national reference group appointed
“In my mind and in my car, we can’t rewind, we’ve gone too far …” (Video Killed the Radio Star – The Buggles. 1979).


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