Steve Brown@August 26. First out of the box crowing …

Comment on Convincing win for Country Liberals: ALP likely to lose its only seat in The Centre by Russell Guy.

Steve Brown@August 26. First out of the box crowing about a “new hope another chance” is the man who persists in referring to those whose social policies he dislikes as the “loopy left.”
Those of us who have laboured for decades to build organisations in Alice and in many other places throughout the Territory, which Mr Brown now takes for granted, are the recipients of this sinister epithet. If I thought that Mr Brown originated it, I would be more concerned, but he is a relative innocent.
Mr Brown “can’t wait to get on with” whatever it is he has in mind in terms of social policy for the sadly neglected town of Alice Springs, but in terms of alcohol policy which I have fought to reform, this quote from the recently published history of the Elliott district, by respected historians Peter and Sheila Forrest, is worthy of respect.
“Since the walk offs from the stations, no black or white leader has been able to suggest where the next step in the walk should be headed. It is a terrible, tragic and too hard conundrum” (2011: 146).
We have been promised a removal of the Berrimah line by the Chief Minister who posed for the Sunday Territorian with a beer in his hand. It remains to be seen if the CL will pursue the alcohol policy it wheeled out so late in the campaign and for which taxpayer costings have not been fully realised nor presented.
It’s my hope that Mr Mills will confer with Bess Price and Alison Anderson before building his mandatory rehab facilities and criminalising drunkenness, perhaps even following similar excessive drinking cultures whose governments are considering a floor price. A new hope and a new chance.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Convincing win for Country Liberals: ALP likely to lose its only seat in The Centre
Steve Brown, just off the top of my weary head, there were 2500 problem drinkers on the Banned Drinkers Register (BDR), installed at a cost of approx $1m for six months and about to be dismantled by the CL govt.
Of that 2500, white and black, I personally know that some voluntarily placed themselves on it as a measure of controlling their own alcoholism.
It empowered them and gave them another reason to get off the stuff. The BDR sent a positive message to some that their daily request and in some cases, humbug, for a six pack (out bush) was a result of their alcoholic condition. This also sent a positive message.
The fact that take-away is available seven days per week does not. As the West Australians have said, a multiple approach to this monster is needed. The BDR was supported by NT police.


Convincing win for Country Liberals: ALP likely to lose its only seat in The Centre
Janet@August 28. I always enjoy spending time in the “wilderness,” even though I know you’re referring to a place that exists in the mind of someone who prefers to ignore the reality of the facts relating to public health and alcohol.
This is particularly curious when you can Google an increasing assemblage condemning the liberalisation of alcohol which is what your post seems to support.
In fairness to police, ambo’s, doctors, other utilities, etc, and those families unfortunately victimised, we may ask why Australian governments have not acted on the evidence, while three-quarters of all Australians believe that Australia has a problem with alcohol (source supplied below). That statistic would place you in the “wilderness.”
The evidence – that liquor outlets spawn violence, that responsible service of alcohol exists in name only and that one in three motor vehicle accidents involves excess alcohol – has been there for years.
Public health advocates are not anti-alcohol, just anti-alcohol industry profits at a $36m p.a. expense to the Australian taxpaying community, not to mention the human cost.
The source for evidence presented here can be found at http://drinktank.org.au and if you check it out you might like to sign the petition. It requires a couple of hundred more signatures before presentation to parliament, asking that our government mandate pregnancy health warnings on alcohol products because the industry has failed to do so.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
@ My Opinion, posted 20.2.18. 12:22pm:
I’m an amateur historian, but there’s an argument that the geo-political climate that caused Great Britain to raise the Union Jack over what became the colonies turned out to Australia’s advantage. At least, wisdom in hindsight suggests it so.
Indigenous or First Nations people suffered beyond measure and today assert a form of sovereignty through a limited Native Title that is not altogether historically retroactive, leading to social issues bundled together under slogans such as Closing the Gap.
There is always a relative unity among all peoples constituting a nation, but what seems undeniable is that united we stand, divided we fall.
Councils around the country fly the Aboriginal flag, but not, it seems, all that often from military sites, which still serve to unite a country in a geo-political sense, most often concerned with sovereign borders.
The social problems remain, so do other strategic sites from which the Aboriginal flag can be flown as a symbol of unity within the Alice community.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Surprised. Posted 6/2/18. 7:40AM. Re your comment about costs related to harmful levels of alcohol consumption within NT communities:
“You know, they fail to take into account that currently we pay $50m in the Territory in relation to alcohol sales in taxes. That money unfortunately goes straight to the Commonwealth so there is some arguments there how the Territory Government gets that money back” (Des Crowe, CEO. NT branch of the Australian Hotels Association. ABC 6/2/18, responding to the NT Police Association call for industry responsibility).
This appears to be a game of “pass the buck” with Liquor Inspectors and “new technology” attached to the BDR as a “way forward.”
Smoking in public places is banned and the health warnings that now appear on tobacco products have helped create a greater awareness of the issues related to the peer enforcement of smoking, but the tobacco industry didn’t go quietly.
Perhaps, the alcohol industry needs to admit responsibility and leadership by comparing the costs to public health for its products, but that would affect the corporate bottom line.
The $50m in taxes is miniscule in comparison to the billions spent on alcohol-related health issues that taxpayers subsidise on an annual basis.
That money could well be spent elsewhere.
It’s not an economic issue, but one of leadership in community values and political will.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Laurence, posted February 3, 2018. 6:17pm: Re your comment about a “radical rethink”.
Leaving aside the suite of measures so far employed to address the harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT and notwithstanding the absence of a floor price, there is something in what you say.
Stewardship is an old fashioned word for community values.
In the 1920s, Rev. John Flynn, who knew something about the health of people in the bush, wrote that we would have to render an account one day.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
There is a groundswell of awareness about the use of methamphetamine (Ice) at a community level throughout Australia.
Most people seem to have direct or anecdotal experience of families being tragically affected, but if it was better understood that ‘for every person who uses methamphetamine in a year there are 85 drinking alcohol;for every person addicted to methamphetamine there are 20 addicted to alcohol;for every ambulance call-out for methamphetamine problems there are 25 for alcohol;for every methamphetamine presentation to an Emergency Department there are 30 for alcohol;for every amphetamine-related death there are 65 alcohol deaths’ (source: Emeritus Professor Ian Webster, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education newsletter 2/2/18), the alcohol problem confronting communities in the NT might be considered more seriously.


THE TROLL by Blair McFarland
Thanks for this, Blair. As Monty Python would have it, say no more.


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