What this means is the sealing of the 800km Plenty …

Comment on LETTER: Time for a third sealed national route by Russell Guy.

What this means is the sealing of the 800km Plenty Highway from Boulia, Qld, through to the Stuart Highway in the NT. The reasons given are to save “two days” and allow “mining” quicker export access to “keep Australia going.”
There is no talk here of leaving some bush free from the super highway traffic. It’s as if the wild bush has no value except as a transit zone. The Plenty already carries traffic ranging from beef cattle trucks, miners, locals, tourists and caravans.
I’ve been a regular user of the Plenty for 30 years. It’s graded from both ends annually, sometimes more. Increasing speed of recreational four wheel drives, with off-road campers is a hazard as people make their transit with windows up, oblivious to the wildlife and values of the bush, just getting from one end to the other as quick as they can.
I say, leave it alone. Go the Barkly if you want bitumen. It’s only another 500 kms around and it leaves some of Australia for those who don’t want the increasing madness of mining take-over of land and narrow-focussed productivity goals.

Russell Guy Also Commented

LETTER: Time for a third sealed national route
I’ll try and spell it out for you, Rex. Sealing the Plenty, plus building at least two bridges on the NT side will cost X# of million dollars, but you’ve not been able to grasp the expense of liberal alcohol supply policy on the Australian community, which has already increased with the NT CL government, e.g, burning the $2.5m that taxpayers contributed to the dismantled Banned Drinkers Register (WA now wants it). That’s not including the uncosted proposed rehab prison farms or the cost of factoring in the ongoing recidivist stats … blah, blah, blah … you sound more like Steve Brown every day.
We’ve tried everything in the past forty years except turning down the tap. How long and how many more millions of dollars will be wasted on alcohol abuse – or do you think Treasury is a bottomless pit to be propped up by the mining industry, while being siphoned off by the alcohol industry? This is not a rhetorical question.


LETTER: Time for a third sealed national route
Erwin,
Thanks for inviting the Mayor to give us the benefit of his trip to Boulia and any insight he may have regarding this blacktop adventure. I have not changed my thinking (as posted several times here) and continue to be concerned that Australians can allow alcohol abuse through liberal supply to the tune of $36b p.a. while crying out for more Federal funds to help them live the lifestyle of their choice. Ready when you are, Mr Mayor.


LETTER: Time for a third sealed national route
Rex @ September 6, 12:37AM. The mind-numbing collection of cliches you’ve dredged up to support this “marvelous project” is, quite frankly, a fantasia, e.g., “major national development”, “strategic rail corridors” (at what price, short of smelting Pilbara ore locally and linking into the Ghan?)
Study the history of Australian rail proposals over the past century and you’ll have your eyes opened to strategic rail corridors, “a beacon for the tourist industry” and all “urgently required,” but what, exactly, do you mean by a “much needed new coach route”? Greyhound are just keeping their head above water as it is.
I don’t mean to sensationalise or be negative, but your wild exposition of Aboriginal communities taking a leap into the 21st century is a paper yabber.
If you’re so sure that a cost-benefit analysis for this project has been done over the decades it’s been flying, why hasn’t it surfaced and more especially, from Patrick Hill whose letter to the AS News floated it again so recently?


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Hermannsburg historic precinct gets cash injection
With thanks to the pioneering Lutheran Missionaries whose venture of faith during the 1880s was a hard slog and is well-recorded.
Their Christian concern for the Arrernte underpins our tourist industry at a time when such religious freedom as allowed their Mission Station to implement employment and educational training programs are not considered significant by a large portion of our population, including the majority of politicians.


Emirates jetliner dumps fuel on Central Australia
I believe the Galaxy is short field take off / landing as opposed to the Airbus / Boeing Emirates type which may make the comparison inequitable.
Just saying and stand correcting, but the Alice is well known as an emergency field for long-haul flights, so weight is an issue. Since the port of departure is some hours north, fuel load could still have been critical.


Outback Way to get more bitumen
There goes the neighbourhood.


NT-SA agreement hardly historic
Paul Keating, in his 1992 Redfern Speech, framed by speechwriter Don Watson, author of the somewhat dryly punitive opus, The Bush, also claimed a historic mandate, announcing success for Reconciliation “within the next decade.”
It’s in the nature of politics to claim credit for doing something, mostly spending tax revenue and living in hope that it won’t run out.
In my opinion, the “historic” issue is just a beat up or a sop.
Pass me another piece of Bicenttennial birthday cake, please.


Greens on Pine Gap: Move towards non-aligned foreign policy
The Greens, once declared an “alternative” political party, inherited the structural social and cultural goalposts, but they keep trying to kick goals through them.
Kinselas’s, one of Sydney’s long established pubs, was recently sold through the Sunsuper-backed Australian Pub Fund for $22m.
It was purchased in 2010 for $10m, but it’s been said that it would have gone for $40m had the NSW government’s lock-out laws not been enacted.
Senator Di Natale obviously supports other supply-reduction measures, but dealing with the structural wealth of Super funds and their investment in the alcohol industry is a bit more difficult than continuing to bang the party political donation route to government corruption.
It would be nice if politicians who eschew liberal social policy when it suits them, could tackle financial regulation through institutionalised investment in the alcohol industry.


Be Sociable, Share!