Dr Walker and Fred Chaney appear to be on the …

Comment on Remote Oz: neglect is just the beginning by Bob Taylor.

Dr Walker and Fred Chaney appear to be on the money with this broader issue of remote OZ and Fly-In Fly-Out (FIFO).
As I said at the recent Chamber of Commerce forum the Whitlam government tried a similar decentralising policy, but that – or was it the government – suffered a natural death. The CLP have promised (or was it Terry) a decentralisation policy and only time will tell on whether they can deliver. So both sides of politics have seen the need, have tried or are trying to introduce decentralisation as a policy. However as the article hints the present FIFO regime does not benefit remote OZ and the powers that be in the Australian government and/or private enterprise do not see any advantage to a decentralising policy for their bottom line.
I don’t know who said “follow the money”, but the wealth of the nation might originate in remote and rural Australia, but it soon flows to the south east, south west or overseas. By placing strong conditions on mining permits and/or the purchase of land by overseas corporations or governments this flow could be slowed or reversed to a certain extent. For example permanent accommodation and facilities must be built within an half an hour’s drive of the mine and/or in the nearest gazetted town and all land purchases must be controlled or owned by a majority of Australian citizens or shareholders. This would help promote and focus “the national interest in remote Australia” – whether it would help foreign investment is another matter.
Thanks to a democratic internal party vote Robyn Lambley is now the Deputy Chief Minister, congratulations and a win for remote NT. Her promise to protect the political back of Terry Mills might be tested during the term of this parliament. I have yet to be convinced that the powers that be in Darwin are in agreement with and will fully support the new paradigm shift, but I do have my fingers crossed.

Recent Comments by Bob Taylor

Too hot? Try laying bricks.
Good on you boys, a tough way to earn a dollar, but someone has got to do it. Hope they have plenty of sunscreen on to protect themselves from the sun’s direct rays and the indirect rays off the blocks. It took me a while, but as a lot of people did, I laid all the blocks on our family home in the late 1970’s, in my spare time after working five and half days a week for Barlclay Bros and then Sitzler Bros.


Getting screwed
Hal: Are America, Australia or the whole world getting screwed?
Before we all get screwed or whatever, Happy New Year, everyone.


New attraction while we can’t look after the ones we have?
A timely comment Alex. Let us hope the powers that be and the general community are paying attention.
Thank you for your insightful comments throughout the year.
Happy New Year for 2018, Alex.


Recommendations in for National Indigenous Art Gallery site
If they / we are looking for a MONA effect and an outcome that the whole world will want to come and see, the following may be required as a minimum:
A David Walsh type person with a vision, passion and skills necessary to drive this major project. Retain ANZAC Oval and the rugby facilities, so there is a green buffer between the proposed National Indigenous Art Gallery and the CBD.
Purchase the RSL property and together with the high school site, build something grand with a sweeping northeasterly aspect into, around and backing onto ANZAC Hill appropriate to any needs of the traditional owners of the hill.
Place the main entrance and vehicle access on Schwarz Crescent with an improved foot / cycle pathway system linking into the CBD on either side of ANZAC Oval. Just another comment to keep the ideas flowing.


On youth prisons: grandmothers, reformers, revolutionaries
On the subject of grandmothers and their potential for a positive influence on children’s lives I recommend the reading of the “Hillbilly Elegy” by J. D. Vance and the comments on the book by Greg Sheridan in the Weekend Australian July 22/23 2017.
As Greg says: “The real hero of the book is his grandmother,” although an American (USA) author and a story set in America about poor white working class people, the outcomes of the author could be achieved by an Australian child with the help of a caring grandmother.


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