If you have to have a licence to sell it, …

Comment on Briscoe Inquest: reduce supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets, says Coroner by Russell Guy.

If you have to have a licence to sell it, you should have to have a licence to buy it. It’s a drug.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Briscoe Inquest: reduce supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets, says Coroner
Ray, despite the fact that you continue to lack the courage of your convictions by not posting your surname, your comments need some kind of response.
I’m glad to see that you agree that alcohol-abuse in Alice is a “massive” problem in what you consider to be focussed on a “disproportionate” Aboriginal sector, but like the current Queensland government attempt to review / dismantle Alcohol Management Plans (AMP) put in place in Aboriginal communities by the Beattie’s ALP govt in 2002, you and Steve Brown et al, continue to focus on alcohol-abuse as an Indigenous problem, using terms like “racist” and “paternalist” when the point has been made ad nauseum that it’s an Australia-wide problem and increasing.
The alcohol industry has no intention of self-regulating or packing up and going away.
In your posts, you could start asking why Australia has such a massive, drinking culture and look a little closer at the alcohol industry, its advertising, promotion, mates in government and business.
In the NSW community of Byron Bay last Summer, I worked for two weeks emptying wheelie bins from holiday lettings and was staggered to find that 95% were brim full, each morning, with alcohol bottles, ranging through beer, spirits and champagne (a correct statistic).
For the past weeks, local papers have been running letters to the editor debating the alcohol problem in Byron as the liquor chain ‘Dan Murphy’ wants to open.
Can I suggest you go and see the Salvation Army officers in Alice, talk to them about homelessness and families suffering from various alcohol related issues and obtain a copy of the Alcohol Awareness Week data just released.
Do some research instead of saying things like “I think you’ll find…” etc. Get on the web and access the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education site. It will open a proverbial Pandora’s Box of ongoing research into the disproportionate effects of liberal alcohol supply in the Australian community.
Regards, Russell (bona-fide, card carrying member of the lunatic fringe and loopy left association).


Briscoe Inquest: reduce supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets, says Coroner
Rex, re IGA’s selling a bucketload, this is precisely why “a licence to buy” puts some responsibility into the supply side. Organisations like the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) have said that “responsible serving of alcohol” is effectively in name only.
Instead of always focusing responsibility on the demand side, if we can’t get control on the supply side, you can forget about all the talk about Royal Commissions into the deplorable state of the alcohol industry in the NT – it will just be another expensive talk-fest. Bucketloads of money, Rex.
The BDR was headed in the direction of having to produce a licence to drink and the West Australians think highly enough of it to be considering its introduction.


Briscoe Inquest: reduce supply of excess alcohol from take away outlets, says Coroner
Yes, Rex, we know your “view on alcohol availability”, but may I suggest you call the Salvation Army Media Office in Darwin. Their latest Alcohol Awareness Campaign data is now available showing the harm that alcohol is doing to Territory families and their kids. From my reading it suggests that non-Indigenous people are highly represented. I quoted from the 2011 AAC earlier this year in relation to mental health and alcoholism at AS News Online.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Aboriginal flag on Anzac Hill: the nays have it 
@ My Opinion, posted 20.2.18. 12:22pm:
I’m an amateur historian, but there’s an argument that the geo-political climate that caused Great Britain to raise the Union Jack over what became the colonies turned out to Australia’s advantage. At least, wisdom in hindsight suggests it so.
Indigenous or First Nations people suffered beyond measure and today assert a form of sovereignty through a limited Native Title that is not altogether historically retroactive, leading to social issues bundled together under slogans such as Closing the Gap.
There is always a relative unity among all peoples constituting a nation, but what seems undeniable is that united we stand, divided we fall.
Councils around the country fly the Aboriginal flag, but not, it seems, all that often from military sites, which still serve to unite a country in a geo-political sense, most often concerned with sovereign borders.
The social problems remain, so do other strategic sites from which the Aboriginal flag can be flown as a symbol of unity within the Alice community.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Surprised. Posted 6/2/18. 7:40AM. Re your comment about costs related to harmful levels of alcohol consumption within NT communities:
“You know, they fail to take into account that currently we pay $50m in the Territory in relation to alcohol sales in taxes. That money unfortunately goes straight to the Commonwealth so there is some arguments there how the Territory Government gets that money back” (Des Crowe, CEO. NT branch of the Australian Hotels Association. ABC 6/2/18, responding to the NT Police Association call for industry responsibility).
This appears to be a game of “pass the buck” with Liquor Inspectors and “new technology” attached to the BDR as a “way forward.”
Smoking in public places is banned and the health warnings that now appear on tobacco products have helped create a greater awareness of the issues related to the peer enforcement of smoking, but the tobacco industry didn’t go quietly.
Perhaps, the alcohol industry needs to admit responsibility and leadership by comparing the costs to public health for its products, but that would affect the corporate bottom line.
The $50m in taxes is miniscule in comparison to the billions spent on alcohol-related health issues that taxpayers subsidise on an annual basis.
That money could well be spent elsewhere.
It’s not an economic issue, but one of leadership in community values and political will.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
@ Laurence, posted February 3, 2018. 6:17pm: Re your comment about a “radical rethink”.
Leaving aside the suite of measures so far employed to address the harmful levels of alcohol consumption in the NT and notwithstanding the absence of a floor price, there is something in what you say.
Stewardship is an old fashioned word for community values.
In the 1920s, Rev. John Flynn, who knew something about the health of people in the bush, wrote that we would have to render an account one day.


Congress call: Put full-time police back at bottle-shops
There is a groundswell of awareness about the use of methamphetamine (Ice) at a community level throughout Australia.
Most people seem to have direct or anecdotal experience of families being tragically affected, but if it was better understood that ‘for every person who uses methamphetamine in a year there are 85 drinking alcohol;for every person addicted to methamphetamine there are 20 addicted to alcohol;for every ambulance call-out for methamphetamine problems there are 25 for alcohol;for every methamphetamine presentation to an Emergency Department there are 30 for alcohol;for every amphetamine-related death there are 65 alcohol deaths’ (source: Emeritus Professor Ian Webster, Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education newsletter 2/2/18), the alcohol problem confronting communities in the NT might be considered more seriously.


THE TROLL by Blair McFarland
Thanks for this, Blair. As Monty Python would have it, say no more.


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