Hardware giant Bunnings set to start construction of Alice store

Bunnings is currently finalising the building contract for its new warehouse in Alice Springs, according to the company’s Chief Operating Officer, Peter Davis.

He says the firm “is looking forward to commencing construction within the next two months”.

The store, on the North Stuart Highway, represents an investment of over $23 million, says Mr Davis, and will provide employment for more than 100 local residents.

It is expected to open in mid 2013.

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12 Comments (starting with the most recent)

NB: If you want to reply to a previous comment, start your comment with this notation: @n where n is the number of the comment you want to reply to.
  1. Jess Marie
    Posted April 23, 2013 at 9:50 am

    Daniel, I have worked in Bunnings for almost nine years. And I have just helped set up the Armadale store in WA. We employed just over 130 team members. All team members are given all the training they need to do their job with confidence. Bunnings is a fun, friendly, loyal and supportive employer who gives there team members the chance and support to grow with in the company, and that is shown but the great customer service we provide every day. The local Hardware stores will have nothing to worry about if they continue serving and providing their customers with what they need. I will be putting my interest in for the Alice Springs store. I think this is a big and bold venture for Bunnings.
    Bring On The Big Green Box In Alice 🙂

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  2. Dave
    Posted January 26, 2013 at 8:32 am

    @7 BJ, You’ll find that Bunnings will attract workers to the area where the store is located because they want to transfer from another store or will move there because they know that their job is secure. There is no evidence in my area where a Bunnings opened that businesses close down when a Bunnings opens. Our town’s Bunnings opened 2 1/2 years ago and there are people who work there from all over the country.

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  3. Dave
    Posted January 26, 2013 at 8:26 am

    Bunnings opened in Armidale NSW (Pop 25,000) in May 2010. The Home Hardware and Armidale Building Supplies are still in business, and only one business (a plant nursery) in a similar field to Bunnings has closed. In fact several new independent competitors have opened in the area. The staff are always happy and the service is great. The community loves the assistance from the BBQ’s and donations and the place is not full of kids and uni students. There are real experts and helpful staff who now have full time jobs and spend their money locally.

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  4. Neville
    Posted December 17, 2012 at 7:31 pm

    When a concrete tool joiner worth $30 anywhere else in the country costs $145 at Alice Springs Home Hardware you know it is time for some competition. The saying in town that it is due to freight is a load of crap. You can’t tell me that it costs $115 to send something that weighs about 300 grams. Same thing with a trowel machine I wanted to buy, in Alice $5500, I bought the same machine delivered from Bundaberg QLD (from a shop, not on the net) for $3200 and I had it in 4 days. I ordered timber pegs from home hardware and 5 months later they arrived.
    If Bunnings can bring these local stores into line then they are a Godsend.
    The Alice Springs News Online invited B & S Home Timber & Hardware to reply. Manager Brenton Joy sent the following:
    Erwin, In response to Neville??? Neville could be Nigel or whoever and may work for Bunnings, who knows.
    Some facts: Concrete jointing tools range from $14 to $75 depending on size and quality. We do not have one in the range of $145.
    We have just sold a concrete finishing machine (troweling machine) for $2100.00 including freight landed here in Alice Springs.
    I do not believe the story about timber pegs, my staff do not recall a sale like that, and they have very good memories.
    Freight does play a big part in the retail price of goods, compared to hardware stores in most capital cities they will get all their stock free into store where as we pay over $40,000 per month in freight.

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  5. R Henry
    Posted October 12, 2012 at 7:36 am

    Well if they get me what I order and not a substitute because it is a better profit for them, sell me what I want without referring to a tradesman in business as to what I should be charged or even sold the material, sell me glues that actually stick instead of stuff that is “better for human consumption” but almost washes off with water, the same for pressure pack paints, also not demand my licence when I want to buy glue or P/P paint (which should be required only if a customer appears to be under age), and also give me a cost for an item without making it an order.

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  6. Bob Durnan
    Posted October 10, 2012 at 11:36 am

    Unfortunately we live under a system where the big commercial inter-state and overseas fish are encouraged to eat the small local ones, regardless of the results in the local habitat. A few months back, Steve and Janet Brown were lamenting the fact that the NT Labor government permitted this system, and they advocated some major government interventions to protect the local businesses. I’m not particularly interested to revive that discussion, but it would be useful to hear from others about any practical ways that small locally owned businesses such as Home Hardware could be assisted when the Bunnings shark enters our small pool.

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  7. S Taylor
    Posted October 10, 2012 at 8:49 am

    For all those futuristic Bunnings supporters, I wonder how many of you – and that includes parents, grandparents and patrons – will still be seeking sponsorship from your local Home Hardware store for your kids, clubs and sporting organisations? If you think it will make an impact, you’re right! But will it be a good or bad one?
    Don’t forget, we shouldn’t bite the hand that feeds us.

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  8. Paul
    Posted October 9, 2012 at 11:47 pm

    If local stores are offering exceptional services then they have nothing to fear from Bunnings?

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  9. BJ
    Posted October 4, 2012 at 11:32 pm

    This business will hurt many stores in town, hardware, nurseries, plumbing stores, cabinet makers etc. People keep saying they will employ 100 workers!! Where are they going to come from? Retailers are struggling now to find workers.

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  10. Mick
    Posted October 4, 2012 at 6:08 pm

    As small staff as possible? Daniel, where do you get your facts from? Having worked at Bunning part-time while going through Uni interstate, I can tell you they do not employ as small amount of staff as possible. And I can bet you them will be some of the happiest workers in Alice Springs with how Bunnings treats its employees. Before you comment you should have some knowledge about Bunnings.

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  11. Mazzie
    Posted October 4, 2012 at 2:44 pm

    I for one will be happy to see Bunnings open in Alice. It would be great for the town to get a variety of things, and some local employment out of it.

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  12. Daniel Davis
    Posted October 3, 2012 at 12:00 pm

    They can put it any way they like but Bunnings won’t be a positive for the community. The 100 jobs at Bunnings surely won’t be permanent, as the Bunnings model is to operate with the smallest number of staff possible. Any jobs they do create will be offset by the effects on the local operators as has been seen everywhere else that Bunnings have opened.
    We already have some great locally owned hardware businesses that offer exceptional service. Hopefully the people of Alice continue to support the local businesses.

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