The Commission expressed its view that “the potential risk to …

Comment on Gapview knocked back a second time on extended hours for Masters Games grog trade by Hal Duell.

The Commission expressed its view that “the potential risk to community amenity, social harmony and well-being” outweighed “the inconvenience encountered by visitors and contestants to the Masters Games wishing to purchase takeaway alcohol”.
That would have to be one of the most positive comments from a government agency that I have read in a long time. Now it needs to be extended to tourists and visitors in general, not just those who are coming to compete in the Masters Games.
To rephrase it – community amenity, social harmony and well-being trump any inconvenience felt by visitors to Alice Springs.
So true, and not before time.
Now let’s have a day off. Sundays are still considered somewhat special, and as most of the take-away outlets are already closed on that day, why not go all the way and close the rest of them?

Hal Duell Also Commented

Gapview knocked back a second time on extended hours for Masters Games grog trade
That’s a good final point in Russell Guy’s last post (October 10, 2012 at 8:01 am). He says (or so I read it) that the Byron Youth Service is asking tourists to work with them in understanding their community problem.
Why does the NT Tourist Commission, or whatever they are calling themselves these days, and whether they are based in Alice or in Darwin, not adopt the same approach? Instead of worrying that restrictions will negatively impact on tourists’ enjoyment, rather ask them for their help.
Most tourists visit us to see Central Australia, to have an “outback experience”. Very few visit to drink until they fall down, and those few we don’t need and can no longer afford.
Blind Freddy can see the effects of alcohol on our streets, and asking for help would show both maturity and courage. It would certainly be better than the current head-in-the-sand attitude in which we pretend that the problem is down to a few unruly drunks, but otherwise everything is hunky-dory.
We all know it is most definitely not hunky-dory. If the Tourist Commission has still to figure that out, then they want sacking and replacing with someone a bit more perceptive.


Gapview knocked back a second time on extended hours for Masters Games grog trade
@Steve
As you say: “There is only one way out of Ground Hog Day Hal! That is by doing something to break the cycle.”
I do so agree! And we could break the cycle of having a steady supply of inexpensive take-away grog available in Alice Springs by bringing in a day off, a day off for me and for you and for all the town.
The binge drinkers and their families and neighbors would also get a day off.
Are there really that many desperate alcoholics among them? I question that, but if there are, why must we pander to them?
And as for repeating myself …


Recent Comments by Hal Duell

Morrison announces cash injection for NT
In other words, frack and you can have your money back.
Now we know.


‘Anzac Oval not for sale’: govt under pressure on gallery plans
After walking over the proposed site for the new rugby oval(s) and appreciating again from a close perspective the majesty of the MacDonnell rampart, I wonder the area was not considered for the art gallery in the first place.
And then with the millions saved by not building a new oval, build a three or four story apartment complex in the Todd Mall. Scotty’s might be a good place to start.
If life is what’s wanted and needed to revitalise the CBD, people living there will do it.


Fracking OK, but under ‘strict laws’ – Gunner
From the moment Gunner failed to give an unequivocal NO to fracking during the last election, we all knew this was going to happen. It was just a matter of time.


‘Anzac Oval not for sale’: govt under pressure on gallery plans
I write this as an appeal to Chief Minister Gunner to reconsider his choice of the Anzac area as the location for the proposed National Aboriginal Art Gallery.
Not only did your own steering committee nominate the Desert Park as the optimal choice, but ever since your overriding of their recommendation, the wheels have been coming off what was once a project that had everyone on board.
Many in Alice recognize the heritage value of the old Anzac High School and the Anzac Oval, and while neither carries official heritage listing, I understand efforts are being made to rectify that.
Yes, it would be possible to relocate the rugby fields of Anzac Oval, but at what addition to the cost of building the proposed gallery?
I suggest the final nail in the coffin of public indifference regarding this issue was the published plans to do away with a car park that many who work in the CBD use every day.
The score so far seems to be the destruction of a still valuable building of heritage value and of an oval of similar value, the cost of a new rugby stadium and the cost of a new car park. And all that before construction on a new gallery can begin.
I ask you to please reconsider the Desert Park, as that choice would mean no valuable building to take down, and neither a new car park nor a new stadium needed. I suggest this would be a better choice both economically and politically. Not only would the project cost less, but it would not alienate any of your supporters in Alice Springs.
I will close with a cautionary note to the Gunner ALP government in Darwin: When you next come to town to consult, please don’t repeat your mistake of thinking Central Australia is fly over country.


Youth crisis: broken window of tolerance
As noted by all the comments so far, this is an excellent article, well reasoned and well presented.
But to engage with the marginalised youth in Alice in a positive manner, a venue is needed. Such a venue is at hand. The old Anzac High School would fill that bill admirably.
I hope our Town Council reads this article and carefully considers whether a MOU with Darwin concerning the proposed art gallery, which would destroy that high school building in a quest for more tourist dollars and a dubious attempt to reinvigorate the CBD, is really more important than attempting to address the very real youth social issues plaguing Alice Springs.


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