Erwin, In relation to the Gapview knock-back, readers may also …

Comment on Gapview knocked back a second time on extended hours for Masters Games grog trade by Russell Guy.

Erwin, In relation to the Gapview knock-back, readers may also like to know that the Woolworth’s-owned Dan Murphy’s Liquor Chain licence application in Byron Bay’s CBD, in a Cinema Complex, for which they confidently paid a 25 year lease up-front, has been denied by the NSW Independent Liquor and Gaming Authority (ILGA) for similar reasons given by the NT Licensing Commission.
With social concerns in a tourist market like Alice Springs, local State MP, Don Page remarked: “This is the right decision and I am pleased that the independent body has come to the same conclusion that police, the local community and myself all came to … the concerns included the proposed location in the CBD and the high rate of alcohol-related assaults that have been occurring in Byron Bay.”
According to the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics, the Byron Local Government Area recorded almost four times as many alcohol-related, non-domestic violence assaults as the statewide average.
One local newspaper reported that “during the licence application, a wide-cross section of the community, including church leaders, police, politicians, school teachers and teenagers gave passionate addresses to the panel for over five hours” (Echo. 9/10/12).
Byron Youth Service has taken the lead to change the binge drinking culture in Byron – and Australia – with its “Cringe the Binge” campaign, citing the town as a “microcosm of all the negative impacts of binge drinking – drink driving, multiple fatalities, sexual assault, street violence, brawls, domestic violence and trauma, anxieties and depression, and the early initiation of young people into alcohol consumption”.
They are also asking tourists to work with them in understanding their community problems.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Gapview knocked back a second time on extended hours for Masters Games grog trade
Steve, you may have had the most voters in the Council elections, but you didn’t have a majority. In this issue, you are outnumbered, even in these pages. Face it, the town wants and needs a change in liquor supply regulation, not just an expensive, so-called rehab “solution.”
Robyn Lambley’s talking about a mix of supply and rehab, even Terry Mills hasn’t ruled out supply restrictions and their political stablemate Nigel Scullion is against the re-introduction of alcohol into remote communities, because “it has never worked.”
Your “tax-payer” logic has never convinced me because the alcohol industry makes a profit while I pay for the 25% of alcohol-related car accidents Australia-wide and the white youth-binging emergency admissions etc, due to responsible serving of alcohol so that you can go to your fridge and get on the sauce after work, supposedly, or as you say several times in yr posts, “probably.”
Your 97th no-brainer is another reminder that you’re increasingly becoming a lone ranger on the need for alcohol supply regulations. Take the Gapview knock-back as a sign of a of law and order town future.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

Cops nab alleged grog runners
@ Ted Egan. Posted June 15 at 11:19am:
I think you know the answer to that one, Ted.
Since 1986 when Justice Muirhead proposed that glass flagons be withdrawn, due to their being a lethal weapon in alcohol-related fights, the packaging has changed and we have plastic bottles.
In the apocalyptic world of a shrill society that is being destroyed by the commercialisation of alcohol, there are proposed variations to takeaway supply for Tennant Creek and the Barkly: 4-7 for Tennant Creeks and the wider Barkly 12-7 Monday to Saturday. No Sunday trading.
The Licensing Commission proposes that the sale of the following products will be limited to no more than one of the following per person per day:
• 18 cans or stubbies of light beer (not more than 2.7% alcohol by volume); or
• 12 cans or stubbies of mid-strength beer (not more than 3.5% alcohol by volume); or
• 6 cans or stubbies of cider or full strength beer; or
• 6 cans or bottles of Ready to Drink mixes; or
• One bottle of fortified wine; or
• One bottle of green ginger wine; or
• Two x 750 ml bottles of wine; or
• One 750 ml bottle of spirits, unless one such bottle has been purchased in the past 24 hours.
Any person of age who is not on the Banned Drinkers Register can purchase that amount of grog six days a week.
A similar situation exists in Alice Springs seven days a week, with a floor price of $1.50 per standard drink.
The Gunner Government was looking at buying back takeaway alcohol licences from the critical mass of outlets in the Alice Springs CBD, but I’ve not heard any success of late.
At least it reveals an admission that the policy of the past fifty years of liberal supply has been disastrous.
I knew two young Aboriginal men, among others, Colin Proud and Ivan Dixon when I worked at CAAMA in the early 80s whose lives were destroyed by alcohol.
There have been thousands since.
Colin was a teetotaller, but the destruction of his world was too much to bear. Ivan passed away, also in his 30s, from cirrhosis of the liver. They would have been in their 60s now and good friends, I’m sure.
The sale of grog by Aboriginal-owned outlets and secondary supply by Aboriginal people is a fact of life.
The latter is vice, the former is unfortunate. The net result is the same.
It would still destroy people like Colin who lost hope in the apocalyptic world of a shrill society.
We haven’t come a long way from the Yuendemu flagon wagon. The government drives it around the track while people look on like a sport in the colosseum.
They probably think it’s politically naive to do much more or maybe, given the consultation over the Art Gallery, it’s what the people want.
The proposal for a 24/7 Youth Centre has no mention of turning the tap down.
The Gunner Government rejected limiting seven days a week takeaway in the NT as recommended by Justice Riley, but maybe we should be encouraged that they have proposed no Sunday in the Barkly and reinstated the BDR. It seems to have bipartisan support.
Perhaps, Colin may have been encouraged and gone on the BDR.


Cemeteries could be turned into parks
I endorse Domenico and Hal’s comments below, although a lot of epitaphs on sandstone are being erased by time and wind.
Some are evidence of a more Christian society one hundred years ago, others are philosophical.
It’s interesting and reflective to wander through the older section of our cemeteries; to maintain, rather than deny present and future generations of historians.


‘Reduce chaos: police needed at all liquor outlets’
@ Travis, posted May 27th at 7:37pm.
You deserve some kind of an answer, Travis.
I can feel your anger and I can understand how you might see the alcohol restrictions as “pointing the finger at black people,” but maybe it might save some lives.
To answer some of your questions, the tap is being turned down in some states, e.g. WA, NSW and Queensland, to my knowledge.
The coward punch comes to mind and winding back on serving some drinks late at night, but to return to the NT and your question about where the “so-called leaders” were after the legal right to drink alcohol was conferred on Indigenous people fifty years ago.
Very serious mistakes were made by NT Governments during that time. Allowing the density of takeaway alcohol outlets to build up in the Alice Springs CBD and making it available seven days a week, including at roadhouses, made a lot of money, but it has devastated Indigenous people.
Why this is so is not as simple as people taking responsibility for their drinking as you say “when it was all starting to go the way it is now”.
I have my own reasons, brought about by decades of living and working with blackfellas, side by side, making many friends and learning more than I contributed.
It would be easy for me to give up coming to this site and just go away somewhere to the east, where the living is easy, but my spirit might wander.
You would think that the so-called leaders would do more to turn down the tap on takeaway alcohol they have, which is patchy.
I don’t know why they don’t get the connection to culture. Hope it helps to know that there are some of us who understand the way you feel.


‘Reduce chaos: police needed at all liquor outlets’
@ Alice Local. Posted, 26th May.
The ABC (16/5/18) reported that there has been a “drop in family violence” under the present alcohol restrictions which include Sunday-free takeaway sales in Tennant Creek.
“Police and support agencies believe the restrictions are behind a sharp decrease in domestic violence incidents in the outback town.”
This would appear to contradict your statement about the effects of further alcohol restrictions in Alice Springs leading to an increase in criminal activity.


‘Reduce chaos: police needed at all liquor outlets’
@ Travis, posted 26th May. 7:51AM.
Not turn the tap off (prohibition), but turn it down, Travis. There’s a difference. Drinking alcohol is not a right. It’s a privilege with responsibilities under law.
That law applies to all people, regardless of race. It’s being changed because it is no longer working in the interests of everyone.
The reason why police are needed at take-away outlets is because there is a cultural issue with people drinking in areas that have been declared dry.
In many cases, this has been done at the request of people in those areas, often to avoid violence which impacts all people in Alice Springs.

@ Alice Local. Posted 26th May. 8:03AM.
You are correct about non-existent employment opportunities in some communities, but there is work available in some and it can improve.
It’s the old problem of 95% of the population living on the coastal fringe and little appropriate focus on more remote or regional areas, e.g., an agricultural and pastoral college in Alice Springs to train Indigenous workers for the industry and upgrade skills in a range of developing areas.
Your comment about “cutting alcohol take away hours and having dry days” being a “joke” may be so for you, but not for those who are alcohol dependent, nor their families and neighbours.
There are numerous reasons as to why further cuts to alcohol supply should be tried.
Sunday-free takeaway or dry days, especially on welfare payment days can minimise workload for police and authorities. It can help ease a crisis situation and allow people a chance to dry-out, maybe even give them a chance to reassess and train for employment. It can assist family dysfunction, etc., etc.
The present level of alcohol consumption in the NT has been declared as unsustainable, i.e., we can’t afford it, so things have to change.
Personally, I’m tired of losing friends to harmful levels of alcohol consumption and seeing the bush as worse for the wanderer, which is what you allude to by suggesting that criminal activity will increase.
Look at what is happening in Tennant Creek. Dry days again, years after the cessation of Thirsty Thursday. And on it goes.


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