Janet, your understanding that communities are “dry” is abysmally ignorant …

Comment on Is NT turning back the clock with its plans for compulsory rehab? by Russell Guy.

Janet, your understanding that communities are “dry” is abysmally ignorant of grog running or roadhouse bars in the proximinity of communties, via backroads or blacktop.
The police do their best to enforce it, but they are in agreement with restricting supply, e.g., the BDR, Thirsty Thursday or haven’t you read the Briscoe reports?
The connection between alcohol-abuse, poverty, productivity and “drinking to oblivion” (Tatz, 1978) will not be solved by simply stating that alcoholics must take responsibility.
The community needs to take responsibility for the Alcohol Industry’s leeching of taxpayer funds in the same way that the Tobacco Industry was mandated to provide health warnings on their otherwise delusionary marketing hype.
The Alcohol Industry needs to take responsibility, but we have seen that they are reluctant to do this so far. However, taxation and lobbying for reform is well underway.
In your latest post, you haven’t made comment about the increasing avenues of supply within the community, the yearly “Schoolie” deaths from binge drinking and the crack-down that is occurring, despite the appalling Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) statistics.
Byron Bay youth are running a Summer Program called “Cringe the Binge” – all of this seems to place you at odds.

Russell Guy Also Commented

Is NT turning back the clock with its plans for compulsory rehab?
Janet Brown @ November 24. “The money for nothing groups are not there anymore to keep them drunk and dependent.” Are you referring to welfare payments for Indigenous people here?
If you are, then perhaps you should go out of town and see the lack of employment prospects. Whenever I read your posts, they seem to be focused on Alice Springs, rather than Central Australia.
When one lives and works on a community, the problems associated with and the reasons for alcohol-abuse are much more clearly seen than they are by observing people in the streets of Alice Springs.
Steve Brown constantly remarks about how informed he is by attending to housing issues around town, but he goes home each night.
Your comment about clutching at straws reveals more about your social awareness than your interpretation of higher insurance premiums related to excessive road death payouts and Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, which you describe as “babies born with brain damage through cheap grog”.
Failure to understand the growth of alcohol supply, cheap or otherwise, within the Australian community over the past 20 years, both in terms of product alcohol content, manipulative marketing and licensed outlets is no excuse for your opposition to “prohibition” and support for “indendence of individuals” in choosing whether to consume alcohol or not.
As has been pointed out many times, the supply of drugs such as marijuana, cocaine, ecstasy, heroin, etc are prohibited by law enforcement.
In the central Queensland backpacker haven of Agnes Water, the local butcher ceased trading this week and the premises are about to be occupied by the local bottle shop who are doubling in size.
This has been occurring in other Australian tourist destinations, of course, like Alice Springs (surprise) and Byron Bay. The latter recently banned Woolworths from opening their Dan Murphy liquor franchise in the CBD cinema complex with the help of the NSW Independent Liquor and Gambling Authority (IGLA).
Sort of gives your use of the word “independent” a broader meaning, don’t you think?


Is NT turning back the clock with its plans for compulsory rehab?
In the NT, the Third Party Insurance component of annual car registration is $501. In Queensland it is $383.
The following research shows that in terms of Austrralian statistics, the “NT stands out for the high proportion of road deaths associated with alcohol consumption with 55 per cent of road deaths associated with high risk drinking (Northern Territory Department of Transport and Infrastructure 2004) – source STRONGER FUTURES ALCOHOL PROPOSALS – REGULATION IMPACT STATEMENT (NTG Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. Nov. 2011).
Insurance premiums are just another indication of the need to turn the tap down, helping to prevent the highest rates of alcohol-related hospitalisations in Australia and lower costs of living in the NT.


Recent Comments by Russell Guy

New abattoir for Alice? Some cattle men pushing for it.
@ Trevor Shiell: I’ve been following your posts for some time and they are so on the money that I almost feel depressed after reading your sustained critique of government apathy when it comes to your table of viable industry and opportunities missed.
What is it?
Are you so far ahead of your time that you are dismissed for being a prophet (we don’t do prophets much anymore) or is it that nobody, including MLAs can be bothered to debate you?
The almost total silence that greets your researched posts is a wonder in itself.
I wonder how you can keep posting in the face of such indifference, but, as has been noted in the Broken Window of Tolerance story on these pages, hope springs eternal.
It’s another wonder than nobody has bottled it and sold it in the Mall.


Youth crisis: broken window of tolerance
This is a clear distillation of much of what has been said in these pages for a number of years by many people trying to rationalise the progressive liberalism which has left a legacy of seven days per week takeaway alcohol.
Social engineering is a term used to describe social movements and their effect, but present alcohol reform is deconstructing modern social policy by trying to rationalise liberal supply and its pathology.
The Cultural Revolution that brought sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll to the post-war generation, many of whom became politicians, is as much implicated as anything else when it comes to determining the kind of values societies need to follow in a postmodern world.


Collective memoir of Tracker wins top prize
Great to see that memoir, too long stuck in a rut of selected facts, is forging ahead as a genre that can be worked into a prize-winning consideration and that Australian literature is recognised as being capable of speaking to a present-day cultural reality. Congratulations to the author.


In a flap over flags – a possible compromise?
I think your idea has merit, Alex and I hope it gets up. I made a similar point a month ago concerning other strategic vantage points for the Aboriginal flag, posted 20th February, 2018 at 2:03pm: http://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/2018/02/13/aboriginal-flag-on-anzac-hill-the-nays-have-it/


Feel free to try this at home
The last Sunday in March is apparently ‘Neighbourhood Day’ around Australia. This morning, I was given a free cup of tea at a market stall, announcing the event.
A gent next to me said, “G’day, neighbour.”
I was momentarily affronted that he would break into my morning to tell me this after having had my home broken into during the weak.
I told him so and said that I would get over it, but it’s not the first time I’ve been robbed and I’m bruised.
The flyer that came with the free cuppa said: “The principal aim of Neighbour Day is to build better relationships with the people who live around us. Neighbours are important because good relationships with others can and do change communities, connections help prevent loneliness, isolation and depression. Reach out to families with children and teenagers in your community to help them connect and belong.”
I haven’t exactly been shy about doing this for most of my adult life, but I’m tired, burnt-out, lonely and depressed enough to be affronted by a simple act of goodwill from an anonymous man, posing as a neighbour at a market stall on Saturday morning.
Does anyone else feel like this?


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