I find it astonishing that Council even has to ask …

Comment on Can public art policy deliver common sense? by Hal Duell.

I find it astonishing that Council even has to ask if the coming consultant needs to be local or from elsewhere. Why would they not go local, and if they don’t, what possible reason will they offer for not to?
As for the lizard in the roundabout, what bright spark came up with that idea?
As noted in the article, a roundabout is there to be directly engaged with by drivers.
It is a traffic control measure and has no other purpose.
It is not a place to be contemplating art, neither from passing vehicles nor from any pedestrian walking across the busy street and becoming a traffic hazard by doing so.

Hal Duell Also Commented

Can public art policy deliver common sense?
Congratulations to the Town Council for lifting Dan Murphy’s work. Now sitting on top of the rocks, instead of crouched between them, the work is clearly visible to motorist on both approaches to the roundabout.
A sensible solution to what was a traffic hazard.
And @ Sue Dugdale – from Wikipedia, the perentie is a lizard. It is Australia’s largest monitor lizard or goanna, and the fourth-largest living lizard on earth.


Can public art policy deliver common sense?
@Kieran Finnane
Posted June 18, 2015 at 10:56 am
Understood, Kieran.
And to clarify, I do object to public art being placed in as a traffic-sensitive spot as a roundabout where viewing it takes a drivers eyes off the road and away from oncoming traffic. Roads are hazardous enough as they are without added distractions.
And in that sense, I suppose I consider the traffic signs to be beneficial as they make the roundabout a safer place for the traffic it (the roundabout) was designed for.
The lizard is a winner. I, for one, would like it even more if I didn’t have to quickly glance at it in passing. And unlike the murals around town, there is no safe place to view it from.


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