By my understanding: The Racial Discrimination Act (RDA), passed in …

Comment on Will we better understand the ‘Recognise’ referendum than we did the 1967 one? by Evelyne Roullet.

By my understanding: The Racial Discrimination Act (RDA), passed in 1975, seeks to promote equality before the law for all persons and implements the principle of prohibiting discrimination against people on the basis of their race, colour, or national or ethnic origin.
The broad and general prohibition of discrimination in section 9 of the RDA is accompanied by specific prohibitions of discrimination in a number of areas of public life:–
• access to places and facilities;
• land, housing and other accommodation;
• provision of goods and services;
• the right to join trade unions; and
• employment.
Without the third option “prohibit racial discrimination by any government in Australia – unless the discrimination is intended: to overcome disadvantage, to reduce the adverse impact of racial discrimination in the past, or to protect culture, language or heritage”, the following will not be any longer permitted:
• Priority for employment is given to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander applicants.
• You only need to complete this section if you are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent.
• Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Applicant.
• If you are both of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, please tick both boxes.
(An Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander is a person of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, who identifies as such and is accepted as such by the community with which he or she lives) and all places facilities and institutions being schools, health organisations, hostels, etc … will become available to all.

Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

‘You can make fracking better but you can’t do it well’
Pity he did not follow the same pattern for the National Aboriginal Gallery.


Gallery: Gunner sticks with ANZAC Oval
GUNNER: Every consultation we have done shows the CBD location is the preferred location, and that’s the only location that offers a sense of place and has the space to be able to do it.
Why not proving it to us and shut our mouths by have a petition signed, names and address, instead of spending money and time with a cup of coffee? It will be easy then to see once for all where the majority lies.


Gallery: Gunner sticks with ANZAC Oval
The saga of the “gallery” could be played on the Totem theater’s stage in three acts: Drama, farce, and tragedy.
• Drama – any situation or series of events having vivid, emotional, conflicting, or striking interest or results.
• Farce – comedy in which everything is absolutely absurd. This usually involves some kind of deception or miscommunication.
Farces are popular because they develop in a way that seems more or less realistic, despite the fact that the results are highly improbable.
That is, the characters make decisions that seem to make some sense given the circumstances, but at every turn things get more and more ridiculous
• Tragedy traditionally portrays the protagonist’s fall from high authority or renown to ruin, often predetermined by fate or driven by a tragic flaw. I am waiting for the curtain’s fall.


Wakefield insists on Anzac Oval, ignores majority
In a June 6 media release Dale Wakefield refers to this as “local consultation” which she will be doing “over the next few months”.
In the Mall she is talking of the project saying that a modern gallery is somewhere people go for coffee; this imply that shops will be available in the proposed gallery (makes senses to make a revenue with rents).
How this will help business in the CBD? How many shops will be obliged to close? Even if some relocate, it will mean more vacant shops in the Mall.


Turn rock-throwing into backflips: how community can help
Excellent article on the subject Rainer, but with respect I do not totally agree with this statement:
“The entire Social Services industry has been revolutionised over the last 10 years, with the development of trauma-informed practice being central to the reform. Any new services need to be led by people well trained in this practice”.
Having been a resident since early 70s and worked all my life with teenagers,some residents of Giles House, I see the situation is getting worse than ever and, with respect due to the academic graduates, nothing can replace life experience and good will.
The young social workers too often want to be a friend, without realising that a traumatised or troubled teenager needs an APPROACHABLE, FRIENDLY, RESPONSIBLE adult, not a new friend.
I see a volunteer like a house parent.
Personal requirements of a House Parent in Australia:
• concern for the wellbeing of young people
• understanding of students’ needs and cultural differences
• sense of responsibility
• good leadership skills
• good organisational skills
• able to work closely with others in a community setting
• able to cope with the physical demands of the job.


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