Good point Elvis. And to elaborate further: The owners and caretakers …

Comment on Cultural museum for Alice: That’s how it could be done by Aranda.

Good point Elvis.
And to elaborate further: The owners and caretakers of Alice Springs and the surrounding estates continue to bicker amongst themselves about land ownership protocols.
There is a lack of strong, determined leadership to negotiate such proposals that would provide huge benefits both culturally and economically for Aranda people.
Meanwhile to our children, the town and its visitors I’m afraid to say: The “cultural centre of Australia” as we boast to the eastern states will lose out again.
This proposal for the national cultural centre will end up in Canberra, Victoria or NSW, to the people we criticise for having no knowledge or lack culture.
What an oxymoron, eh?
Meanwhile the fantastic photographic and other non restricted collections of Spencer and Gillen, Strehlow and others who researched with old people throughout Central Australia circa 1890-1960, whose knowledge is unquestionable, will remain in the museum archives that they currently occupy, collecting dust while we continue to argue about “who comes from where”.

Recent Comments by Aranda

The eternal chase: songlines of the Seven Sisters
Very interesting Nicole – obviously you think you are right and have the whole story.
What is absolutely correct is that informants to the researchers, (i.e. the bosses for the corroboree and country you are speaking about) gave those researchers the stories, site names, associated skin names and genealogies for those places.
Are you saying that you know more now in 2018, than the informants of the 1890s – 1920s and 1930s – 1960s did?
While it’s true they didn’t reveal entire stories in some instances, they entrusted the researchers because at the time and due to the pressures of European arrival, culture was under threat.
Those old people showed complete agency in revealing their culture for its survival, and future study and research by those Aboriginal people interested in learning.
I encourage you to keep reading before drawing absolute conclusions.


The eternal chase: songlines of the Seven Sisters
Dear Nicole,
A good post, but some corrections.
• “The caterpillars are not the ceremony holders of the Yeperenye Dreaming”.
You’re right. The local estate group for Tjoritja were the Utnerrengatye people.
All are of the Peltharre / Kngwarraye subsection. This (and the boundaries of the Tjoritjarenye people – who numbered about 40 at the start of the 20th century) is well documented in historical records from Spencer and Gillen and then supported by TGH Strehlow some 30 to 40 years later.
The Mparntwe estate is the Tjoritja estate. The researchers were given this information by the original TOs for Alice Springs at the earliest contact times.
• “The Yeperenye Dreaming is the ceremony that won title for the Arrernte people over Alice Springs”.
Alice Springs is Utnerrengatye. As is the main caterpillar dreaming for Anthwerrke (Emily Gap), and into Alice Springs via the caterpillar / dogs story.
Emily Gap nature park has recently been incorrectly renamed “Yeperenye”. Originally Alice Springs was Penangke / Peltharre (four sections of the kin groups) until the early 20th century when the local Arrernte adopted the current eight skin system. Again, this is heavily documented.
• “Mbantua is not a real clan group”.
Mparntwe is a clan group, and is a site name – however it is not near St Philip’s school. Originally however, you are correct in saying this land was Tjoritjarenye and belonged to those people. It is correct that there are three clan groups; Irplme; Ampetyane / Ngale, Tjoritja (Mparntwe); Peltharre Kngwarraye, and Ntulye; Penangke / Pengkarte.
The Ingkarte for Tjoritja was King Charley, aka Irrapmwe Peltharre, at the turn of the 19th century. His Aknganentye site was Ntyarlkele Tyaneme (old judge’s house) which is where he derived his other name, Ntyarlke. He had brothers and sisters are from whom the Tjoritja / Mparntwe people descend from today. His son now has a town camp named after him, Mpwetyerre, (Abbotts camp), which is also a site name near there.
You make some very good points in the rest of your argument regarding how disenfranchised Arrernte people are (TOs of this area, and neighboring).


Conflicting stories for Parrtjima’s lights on the hill
Why shouldn’t Elders be paid for their consultancy work? Any other person providing professional advice in any other profession would charge a consultancy fee – and a steep one at that! $$. These Elders are constantly humbugged by Government and Organisations in Alice Springs because of their status as key owners and caretakers. Government and Org’s do not see or live the stress these Elders have to deal with that exists in the Aboriginal landscape here. These leaders are torn down and heavily criticised within this community by their own people, and also by Government or non-Aboriginal people who want them to make immediate decisions about events, festivals, land developments etc. This is why even the simplest of decisions about land or development is a major issue.

We should be applauding Apmereke-artweye Benedict Stevens and Kwertengwerles Coco and Felicity for engaging with this highly contentious process.


Dreamtime stories in the palm of your hand
Anthwerrke, Emily Gap, is a major Utnerrengatye site. Not Yeperenye and not Ntyarlke.
The signage/name change is even wrong. The CLC anthro should be helping TOs with proper research as there has been a breakdown in knowledge.
This looks to be a great idea but CLC/TOs, do us a favour and get the story and placenames correct. Jessie Gap signage is wrong too.


Song injects life into lights on the hill
Great to see Apmereke-artweye, Benedict Stevens, involved. He is the owner of the area we now call Alice Springs and as a community we should support and get behind him.

A side note – the organisers should be using the correct eastern/central Arrernte spelling ‘Pwarrtyeme’. The current spelling ‘Parrtjima’ is using the western dialect and is not the correct language for the Alice Springs area. It may also encourage the public to use the correct orthography, developed by Arrernte language workers since the 1980’s.


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