Well said, Paul Parker. Alice Springs is indeed awash in …

Comment on Cultural museum for Alice: That’s how it could be done by Craig.

Well said, Paul Parker. Alice Springs is indeed awash in petty squabbles, over who controls or gains from the information, with lack of interest in sharing.
Sharing is seen as diluting the value of ownership and holders of knowledge would rather take it the grave than let others use it.
It’s a bit like burning your car when it breaks down to make sure no one else can use it / take parts etc.
I’ve seen the last custodians of a ceremony demand a grand each to share it with the next generation.
Ultimately they didn’t get the money and now it’s gone forever.
There are certainly a few who are not like that but many are, especially the older generation.
They tell me they feel unappreciated and overlooked / disrespected by the young people, including those from their own families.
There is a massive generational gap.
Paul, descendants may well visit cultural centres elsewhere to learn what they lost.
I note that the Desert Park employed whitefella archaeologists to teach their Aboriginal staff, so they could be tour guides.

Craig Also Commented

Cultural museum for Alice: That’s how it could be done
There will never be a cultural centre here.
Just the idea of one sparks arguing among various Aboriginal stake holders.
As for a centre that could represent the diverse art and culture of the region?
Forget it.
It’s a nice idea though, one that could be a huge drawcard for tourists.
But only in our dreams.


Recent Comments by Craig

‘CLP rehashes fracking policy that caused its wipe-out’
While all the focus is on fracking the $3b coal to gas plant on our doorstep at Andado is quietly going ahead.
Arsenic / Carbon dioxide etc etc will poison the pristine environment and accelerate global warming.
With so much gas underground why convert coal to gas?
Cheap and dirty extraction and much worse than fracking.
But no fracking so it’s all good.
Where are the Greenies when you really need them?
Go figure!

[Hi “Peter”: The Alice Springs News Online reported on the project in a previous incarnation in December 2011, quoting Arid Lands Environment Centre Jimmy Cocking. “Quietly going ahead?” Reports are the new company is hoping to raise money next year. Their predecessors were flogging a dead horse, judging by the project’s lack of progress so far.
Erwin Chlanda, Editor.]


Tourism, cattle, mining, oil, gas: The world’s your oyster, Stuart.
The ringer pictured is now a historical relic.
Indigenous people, predominantly men, still aspire to work in a pastoral industry but it largely no longer exists.
The pastoral industry has gone high tech aiming at value adding.
With one cow worth a couple of grand they are worth the effort.
These days the average pastoral worker needs to be computer savy to assess cattle as they go through the crush.
The worker needs to be data savy as each cow is uniquely identified and each stage of its life is recorded.
He needs to be able to pregnancy test, perhaps using an ultrasound.
He will be collecting poo samples for analysis and recording the results in the computer.
He will be familiar with a large number of OHandS and cattle well being rules and regulations.
He will probably have passed a Cert 3 level course.
And at the end of the day he will be paid very little as our stations are staffed almost exclusively with backpacker workers, smart and keen and working for the experience not the money.
Times have changed.


NT cost of living $1700 a week
Of course gas development can bring down the cost of living.
The NT Govt gets the royalties from onshore gas sales.
That is potentially hundreds of millions.
Cheaper vehicle rego, cheaper power, better roads and schools, bigger grants to local councils so we don’t get slugged huge increases etc etc.
Gas development is very positive for cheaper living costs.


Helping offenders on probation and parole stay out of gaol
Yes, many prisoners are now refusing parole knowing that they will not be able to comply with parole conditions and do not want Corrections snooping on their lives.
So how will closer supervision, “support” and clear consequences for non-compliance make them change their minds?
The new program assumes that prisoners want to change their lives whereas they are content with them.
They are prepared to live their lives as they see fit even if that means periodically going to jail.
To take just one issue.
They are mostly drinkers, not necessarily alcoholics but they like to drink with their friends and family.
The fact that they drink does not mean they will necessarily reoffend except if drinking becomes an offence.
And while on parole it is an offence.
They simply won’t comply, no matter how often and long they are jailed.
Just like they won’t wear ankle monitors, no matter how long they are jailed for non compliance.
Law and Order as conceived in mainstream Australia only works when there is a high level of acceptance and compliance.
Corrections have not yet realised that they need to understand a lot more about the cultural differences at the justice interface before they can reduce offending and recidivism.


The magic Certificate III: How does Batchelor stack up?
How does Batchelor stack up relatively?
In 2013 to 2015 the Correctional Services training organisation had by far the lowest proportion of inmates in education courses.
In 2014-15 just 14% were in education against a national average of 32%.
At the same time the NT recidivism rate of repeat offenders was a stunning 57%, a world record.
Funds meant for education had been sidetracked into running the prisons, the education computer system had been left inoperable for more than four years.
An internal review found significant internal issues.
Basically education was in a state of collapse.
In 2014 Corrections gave up on education altogether, abolished one teacher’s position altogether and handed over the Batchelor.
How is Batchelor doing … relatively?


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