Craig san Roque: Yes the life extension offered by dialysis …

Comment on Cultural drawcards – lessons for Alice from MONA? by Jamie.

Craig san Roque: Yes the life extension offered by dialysis is valuable but the frustrating part is that all the medical treatment in the world merely prolongs sickness.
Prevention involves diet, exercise and for some less alcohol although I have many stricken friends who never drink.
Knowledge of the progress of diabetes from metabolic disease is not adequate in our medical profession.
Low blood sugar in an obese patient is usually seen by doctors as good, the pancreas is working well when actually it’s over reacting and the person has hypoglycaemia, just a step away from diabetes.
That’s the intervention point, not when the blood sugar is soaring.
Perhaps doctors have given up, compliance with diabetic mediation and monitoring is very low and ensures that dialysis is needed quite soon.
Although not publicised, dialysis protocols have been changed with patients removed from treatment lists as they enter the final stages of the disease.
No more dialysis up to the point of death, the system is in melt down through burgeoning demand.
It’s a painful death, end stage patients suffer terrible headaches, many are content to die to spare themselves more torture.
Quite a few head back to their communities to die without treatment.
The scale of this tragedy is immense.

Jamie Also Commented

Cultural drawcards – lessons for Alice from MONA?
@ Craig san Roque: Yes, hunger is a worry but for reasons that are far worse than you suggest.
Contemporary Aboriginal hunger mainly arises from metabolic disease.
The more obese the person the more they suffer constant hunger.
This is just before full blown diabetes strikes.
Then high levels of sugar will ravage every organ in their bodies, amputations are common as infections cannot be easily controlled.
Many of the skinny Aboriginal people you see are not healthier, they have got full blown uncontrolled diabetes, with no insulin they don’t store fat.
Many are diabetic alcoholics.
In this group most will be end stage dialysis patients within a couple of years.
Most will be dead within five years.
Deaths in the age group 30 – 40 years are common, few live longer than 50.
Constant hunger is all too often the first symptom of tragic medical conditions.


Recent Comments by Jamie

Real estate: Desert Springs up, Larapinta down
A whopping 28.7% drop in the price of Rural Area properties: Take a drive around our industrialised rural area and the reason for the fall in value is obvious.
Lack of enforcement of planning regulations has allowed the trashing of our town’s rural area.


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
I wonder if it would be possible to do an audit of all Cert 1s and 2s completed in Central Australia?
It should be possible and it would be an eye opener and perhaps lead to a formal investigation into the institutional cheating that has been going on for many years.
I reckon there would be thousands of useless certificates out there that have cost governments tens of millions of dollars.
And every year there are hundreds more of them.
Perhaps certification will have to involve a process of formal examination by an independent authority?


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
@ John: From the institution’s point of view the problem is that a Cert 1 does not fund a literacy / numeracy program that could move a student from grade 2 to grade 8/9.
The grade 2 is the common entry point for many students, they are the product of a failed education system.
Grade 8/9 is about the level of a Cert 1 so that means six to seven years of schooling need to be bridged to get to a genuine Cert 1.
It’s simply not possible, if institutions tried they would go broke.
They know that so they don’t even try to remediate.
Instead they fudge.
It’s not just Batchelor, it’s every training organisation with Aboriginal students and the high schools are into it as well.
Their rationale for fudging is that the students are disadvantaged.
It’s easy to criticise but what’s the alternative?


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
84 students received Certificate I. Certificate III went to just 24 recipients.
That’s because Cert 1 is the top of the safe fudge level.
Cert 1s are handed out like lollies with tutors completing the work.
They are the bread and butter of training organisations in our town.
A fudged Cert 1 is safe, ASQA won’t investigate complaints about a lowly Cert 1.
Cert IIIs are more challenging to fudge, and more risky.
Imagine the scandal if Batchelor gave a Cert III to an illiterate student and was caught out by ASQA, e.g. a graduate could complain that he wasn’t taught properly and doesn’t have the skills he should have. Graduate teachers could complain they can’t get a job etc.
Students need to be marginally literate to be safely fudged for a Cert III and very few are.
Good on Yuedumu School for calling them on the pre completed work books.
We have a system where very large numbers of Aboriginal people of all ages have one or more Cert 1s, I know people with three or more.
Very few have qualifications that could get them a job or help them to keep a job.


Horror numbers in tourism stats, with a hint for a solution
Alice will keep going down in non Aboriginal numbers, both visitors and inhabitants, irrespective of a long term plan.
But absolute numbers could well grow.
There are many opportunities here including jobs for anyone who wants to work.
Age is no barrier to employment in our town.
Demand for education, health, and the trades will grow.
Schools in the town currently can’t attract sufficient numbers of qualified and experienced teachers from the NT or anywhere in the country.
There is an influx of new graduates from interstate and before long most teachers will be newly graduated.
The hospital has taken to recruiting from overseas so cultural diversity will be a strong trend.
Medical research is booming.
Tradies will be needed in increasing numbers.
Car sales will do well.
Police and security staff will be needed in increasing numbers.
Our town is inexorably headed for an unsettled future but its not all doom and gloom.


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