Interesting also that Ms. Price was involved at all. She …

Comment on Alice Festival of Light coming out of the dark by Perrurle.

Interesting also that Ms. Price was involved at all. She lays the boots into her people / culture for all to see on social media and on TV and was recently quoted on a prominent talk back show that “We should forget about 40,000 years (of culture)…”
She doesn’t know what team she plays for.

Perrurle Also Commented

Alice Festival of Light coming out of the dark
To Alyeperenye: I don’t think I’ve ever read such ill informed crap in all my life. It is mind boggling how wrong your comments are, and the unfortunate thing is there are so many other Aboriginal people around here who have never bothered to find out the deep intricacies of Anpernerirrentye (kinship) and just how crucial that is to an individual’s links / connection to land, whether it be as an Apmereke-artweye or Kwertengwerle.
Jacinta is not making a claim to be a kwertengwerle for Mparntwe but if she was, either her Atyemeye or Ipmenhe (MF, MM) would have to belong to Mparntwe as she does not have an Arrenge or Aperle (FF/FM).
That goes for anyone.
Just living here or growing up here does not imply you have any connection at all to the traditional estates.
Penangke rightly points out that unless your Aperle, Atyemeye or Ipmenhe were apmereke-artweye for Mparntwe and belonged to the Kngwarraye/Peltharre subsection or someone further back on your family tree did, then you have no claim.
Also, unless you are knowledgeable, partake in ceremonies and the ongoing maintenance of country, culture, sites, songs etc of a traditional estate, then you have a very shallow claim compared to those that do!
You demonstrate the problem with some of our people today. They take a non-Aboriginal world view and try to adopt it and massage it to suit their needs, whether it be for monetary gain, an outstation, or anything else just because they think they are “Traditional Owners”.
This is an insult to the people who live and breath their culture and languages, who understand traditional governance and kinship and who are the real apmereke-artweyes and Kwertengwerles. These are the people who should be listened to when it comes to talking for estates.


Recent Comments by Perrurle

Town Council riven by conflict, lack of leadership
@ Melissa: Is your head so far in the sand that you actually believe Jacinta Price stands for oppressed women and not her own ego and narcissism?
Do you really believe an elected Price will sort out social issues in this town?
Heck, even the most conservative know she’s a rogue with no answers, no track record and will yield no results.


Lhere Artepe director on aggravated assault charge
@ Erwin: Is this not the same Shane Lindner that a few months ago was featured in a story with other Arrernte men about the need for respect, safety and correct conduct of people who come to town from outlying communities?
A contradiction of sorts he stands against violence and negative behaviours yet is now charged with assault.
Shane. Olden day Arrernte men conducted themselves with dignity and respect towards their families and culture. You have a long way to go.
And to talk for this country you need to be a Peltharre / Kngwarraye of the Mparntwe / Tyuretye estate of Alice Springs. Alice Springs is not Ntulye.


Aboriginal-led ‘from the bottom up’: cultural centre
Nganampa Development Corporation? Sorry Owen and Harold. Wrong language on the wrong country.


Problem kids: The whole town must help
Thank you Steve for your considered and thoughtful points of view.
It is refreshing to hear from non-Aboriginal people with real solutions and ideas to help our town and make it a safe place for all citizens.


Chansey Paech to Jacinta Price: ‘Finger pointing must stop’
Thanks Chansey for a very considered point of view.
Utilising children as a political football for self-promotion or notoriety is abhorrent. It is not enough to haphazardly go on media and call for another Intervention or paternalistic approach.
Failed policy experiments like the aforementioned have been a major contributing factor to the complete social disengagement we are seeing.
The Intervention for example wasted billions of taxpayer dollars and had no outcomes in any key social indicators for remote Aboriginal people.
Where are Howard and Brough in all of this? Stronger Futures, Closing the Gap?
The failure of these experiments is not the fault of Aboriginal communities, but poorly implemented policies from Government, complete lack of an informed remote engagement policy and comes down to the simplest of things like devaluing the use of First Languages as a tool to properly engage.
The list is endless. We know that by the time these billions have been spent, only the small change actually makes it on ground in remote areas. Yet, Aboriginal people are blamed for the failure.
It has been argued for decades that while infrastructure, overcrowding, inept public housing, community wide ill-health, lack of employment and education opportunities etc. etc. etc., continue in remote areas we will continue to see the ever increasing trend towards substance abuse, disengagement, unemployment, movement to town and abject poverty.
These factors obviously lead to the endangering of our children, wives and families. All the while people like Tony Abbott talk “lifestyle choices” and call for the closure of remote communities.
There is a significant problem in our communities that we as men need to be accountable for a take action accordingly.
There are programs like Codes for Life (Desert Knowledge) and Akwerrene Mwerre Arnkentye (Good Spirit Men’s Place) that are recently established and that have the ability to do make a major shift in the health of men, our roles in this community and responsibility towards our families and ourselves.
They don’t sugar coat these issues.
There is a significant unaddressed issue with mental health and well-being of Aboriginal men that has multifaceted, inter-generational causes.
Many Aboriginal men were victims of violence in the home, without key role models and while not making excuses, it’s paramount these are addressed on an individual and community level to prevent some of the repulsive behavior we are seeing.
Behaviours that have nothing to do with traditional desert cultures. Such programs need the support of people who have a voice or speak for Central Australia and I encourage those who do to get behind them.
The notion that only one person in Alice Springs has the courage to talk up against issues like family violence is ridiculous.
Female leaders within the Arrernte (and other) desert communities have been advocating for change and speaking to Government for decades, this is nothing new. They have been ignored.
They have told Government that we need children and families to grow up strong with culture and language, because we know that a person with strong identity and grounding is likely to have a better sense of identity and well-being throughout their life. This requires investment.
They have argued for better housing on communities, jobs, restriction on the sales of alcohol and investment in land management and cultural programs that have proven physical, social and employment outcomes.
I agree wholeheartedly with Chansey that the finger pointing must stop.
I encourage those with a public profile, those appearing on national television and media outlets; come up with real solutions to these very real problems.
Don’t throw slang that supports the closeted ignorant ideologies within Alice Springs and Australia and that will lead to future punitive measures that serve to further compound these social problems.
Engage with local Arrernte men and women. Talk to our brilliant older women. Hear what they are saying and advocate for the change they have spoken of for decades.
Talk to men! That’s what’s really needed.
Joel Liddle Perrurle. Alice Springs.


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