We live in a very strange world: We cannot smack the …

Comment on Dylan Voller’s mistreatment started in Alice Springs by Evelyne Roullet.

We live in a very strange world:
We cannot smack the children when they are naughty; we cannot have a curfew to keep them off the streets; but we can torture them when they become criminals.
No, Original Centralian, it is not “alright for these ‘children’ to hold our town to ransom, forcing the citizens of Alice Springs to lock themselves into their homes after the sun goes down every night”.
But neither is the treatment they received at the detention center.

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

Dylan Voller’s mistreatment started in Alice Springs
Yes Phil, and we should also keep in mind that quite often the misbehaviour of a child is a cry for help.
When a child misbehaves, we need to weigh up factors such as context, background and timing before deciding how to react. Many children are being punished for behaviour they cannot control, or that has justifiable cause.
There could be a number of reasons for misbehaviour:
To gain attention.
Lack of skills to deal with the situation differently.
Forgetting the rules or limits.
Children need limits. They need safe rules within which they can make choices, have responsibility and experience success.
Limits must be clear and consistent! Inconsistency leaves children uncertain about what they can and cannot do.
“It’s not my fault!” Blaming others is modeled for the children on a daily basis: by adults, their peers, in the news etc.
We just have to listen to our so called leaders who put responsibility aside and put the blame of any bad situation during their mandate on their predecessors!


Dylan Voller’s mistreatment started in Alice Springs
@ Fred the Philistine, Quote: “I agree children should not be bashed around, but if they want to act like animals then maybe they should be treated like one”. End of quote.
Cruaulty to animals is not permitted in our country. May be we should ask the RSPCA to take over the management of our detention centers, and the prisoners will be treated with dignity.
Words of some Australian leader Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull: “We have very, very strong animal welfare standards.
“We condemn cruelty to animals – full stop.”
Greyhound racing will be banned in New South Wales from July 1 next year, with Premier Mike Baird saying the “widespread and systemic mistreatment of animals” cannot be tolerated.
I will copy the words of Alveda King, niece of Martin Luther King, because I believe that racism is the biggest saddest factor in this drama: “Racism oppresses its victims, but also binds the oppressors, who sear their consciences with more and more lies until they become prisoners of those lies. They cannot face the truth of human equality because it reveals the horror of the injustices they commit.”
Too many Territorians are still coming out of the first fleets.


Dylan Voller’s mistreatment started in Alice Springs
Maybe we should model our system Norway’s.
http://www.businessinsider.com.au/why-norways-prison-system-is-so-successful-2014-12


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

‘Largest, most representative’ collection gives SA gallery edge
Gunner knows and has always known that we cannot afford this project. So, he makes certain that it is not be built, blaming the residents of Alice for this fiasco.


Flag on the Hill: When No became Yes
Concerned Rate and Taxpayer: Explain then why we have a NT flag? One flag OK, is NT not Australia? Why has the Casino so many flags? Is Malaysia invading us?


Flag on the Hill: When No became Yes
How sad to see one flag missing on Anzac Hill, a war memorial.
War does not discriminate, nor should we.
Indigenous Australians have served in virtually every conflict and peace keeping mission in which Australia has participated since the start of last century – from the Boer War to East Timor, and most likely Afghanistan also.
I hope it will fly on the 18 August for the commemoration of the Battle of Long Tan (August 18, 1966).
Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War from 1962 – 1975 involved almost 60,000 Australians of whom 521 paid the ultimate sacrifice.
In 1987 Prime Minister Bob Hawke designated 18 August as Australia’s official Vietnam Veterans’ Day.
The date commemorates the Battle of Long Tan when Delta Company 6 RAR fought an encounter battle against enemy forces in the Long Tan rubber plantation just a few thousand metres from the 1st Australian Task Force base at Nui Dat.
Heavily outnumbered and in jungle conditions, Aboriginal servicemen were among Australian troops who fought a guerrilla war against the Viet Cong. Among the 108 men who fought in Australia’s most famous battle in Vietnam, against an entire Viet Cong regiment of around 1500–2000. Five diggers have been identified as Aboriginal after the battle.
Of the 260 Indigenous Vietnam veterans identified by the Australian War Memorial in 2010, 19 were Navy. Many sailors were involved in transporting servicemen to Vietnam from Australia and patrols to the North Vietnamese coast.
Could we not honour those servicemen by flying the flag?
I can hear the voices saying but they serve under the Australian flag! Have they? A flag which still does not recognise them and did not exist at the time of the Boer war.


Gallery at Anzac consult: council hurries to meet govt deadline
James T Smerk, your comment equals emotional blackmail.


Gallery at Anzac consult: council hurries to meet govt deadline
It is important to respect, recognise and invest in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s cultures. They have told us repeatedly that it is central to their lives, and identified culture as a key factor in improving and maintaining wellbeing. It shapes Indigenous identity, linking people to their community and country, and importantly is a contributing factor to health and wellbeing.
However our government wants to built a so called cultural center which will be a contradiction to Aboriginal Culture.
Possible scenario: Anzac oval disappears (who gets the money?) everything is bulldozered but he gallery cannot be built because of the opposition of the legal custodians of the site.
Protocols for welcoming visitors to country have been a part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures for thousands of years.
Despite the absence of fences or visible borders, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups had clear boundaries separating their country from that of other groups. Crossing into another group’s country required a request for permission to enter.
Another possible scenario: The gallery will be built but legal owners have the rights to tell visitors that they are not welcome.


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