@ Just Sayin. I agree, there is that side to …

Comment on Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred? by Ray.

@ Just Sayin. I agree, there is that side to it as well. My point was that under an Indigenous land use agreement, native title can be extinguished, if the monetary compensation is agreed upon. Everything has its price, if the price is right.
Those who choose to be offended by this will be, not much I can do about that.
Your comments about respecting culture and sacred sites are interesting.
I was unaware that business oportunities to bring tourists into town have been scrapped because we don’t show enough respect and therefore trust does not follow. This is a shame.
Which proposals were they, because the number of bookstores and galleries in town that promote Aboriginal culture are impressive, not to mention the quality of work done by CAAMA that show a culture thriving with modern technology.
Are you referring to the respect and trust shown to local business in town that are actually running and bringing tourists into town that are smashed up, are pelted with rocks, broken into, used as a toilets, etc?
Trust and respect are a two way street, and non-indigenous attractions are also responsible for bringing tourists into town as well.
There is both black and white history in this town, and tourists come here to experience both.
Or maybe they come here for one and learn about the other, how’s that for a win win?
I believe that many developers would be keen to get involved with a project on the Melanka site, but who wants to touch it with the complications of those sacred trees?
I am sure that if one of them died due to construction activity, a huge fine would be written into the contract (dollar value).
Instead, we have an unkempt eyesore in town that could be transformed into something amazing, but it just sits there until the price is right, or they blow over in the next big storm. If it was the tree itelf that was sacred, would a solution be to propogate a cutting and plant that in a place acceptable to the Arrente?
I remember that idea working for a single pine tree that featured on the Turkish peninsula just over 100 years ago.

Ray Also Commented

Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
Hi Russell, glad to see that three words could stir up such a response. How dare you say I am a newcomer? I have been annoying you for years.
My three word initial comment simply stated the obvious. Aboriginal groups are able to negotiate with mining companies (for example) on the exploration / mining on their land.
By negotiate, I mean an agreement to do a certain activity for a particular consideration (money). Many mining companies have been charged and fined for damaging sacred sites.
So one group has agreed to be awarded compensation for the damage caused by the other.
The importance of the site can/has sometimes determined the monetary penalty. You can google that to find the factual links.
Hence, to some degree, sacredness = dollar value is correct.
I remember being told that an event I organized needed a welcome to country speech. I thought OK that’s a nice gesture, and when approaching the appropriate body, was told “yes would love to, the fee will be $300”.
I was gobsmacked that the opportunity to share culture with visitors from around the country was accompanied by a fee schedule.
Sometimes a simple comment is enough to start a conversation, which was my intention, and that worked quite well. Just because I choose not to have my full name published does not invalidate my right to an opinion, it could be that public comment on a public forum and having different opinion to the populist thinking, could be against a policy I work under.


Trees on Melanka block no longer sacred?
Sacredness = dollar value.


Recent Comments by Ray

What REALLY goes on in our streets: Youth worker
Thankyou for this report, it takes guts to come out like this at risk to yourself and your family.
Politicians have the staff and experience to pull the will over people’s eyes.
Media managers have the unique ability to convince us all that is really possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
It is common knowlege about the kids being taken out to communities and having respect knocked into them back in the 70s, and it worked.
Maybe we need the men with the red headbands to be on they job at night. I have absolute faith they would clean it up in no time, unfortunately the dogooders would object and prevent it happening.
I remember talking to a building manager 12 months ago, who did a lot of concrete pours and work during the night.
He told me that they would regularly see up to 200 kids at night, many carried knives, and some of the worst were young girls, and yet now we have high ranking fat cats telling us that the age of criminal responsibility needs to be raised.
As this writer said, these kids know exactly what they are doing, probably more so than our so called leaders.


Council to introduce kerbside recycling
If all the glass and aluminium cans have a value, surely the value of this would outweigh the need for an extra charge of $60.
As Evelyne said, it seems we are being charged to save our council money.


Town still upset with Stuart statue, say researchers
I am not sure if the headline is really accurate, especially if the word town is used as a collective.
I think the statue was a wonderful gift to our town, and due to the nature of the subject matter, naturally it will put some people off, but not the collective “town”.
As far as I can comprehend, there were more than 20 artists, writers and educators were involved. Did they survey a town of 27,000 people?
I really think that with a sculptor with the talents of Mr Egan, we could display a sculpture of a famous Centralian on every roundabout around town, like the Perrrente on Undoolya Road.
These could include Albert Namatjira, Noel Fullerton, Ms Olive Pink, and many other important figures, both black and white, who contributed to The Centre in some way.
Plaques could be mounted on the footpath describing who each person was.
A walking map could be produced guiding people to each one with a description. Would brighten the town and allow us to honour those that made this region what is is today.


Masked cops with assault rifles, but where are the parents?
There is no way a charge like that would ever have a chance of succeeding. This has been discussed many times ad nauseum, and the same old answer comes up.
The necessities of life, food and shelter, are provided. If the kid chooses to not take advantage of that, that’s their choice. That charge is usually reserved for the worst cases of kids locked in cupboards, covered in cockroaches and faeces, emancipated and malnourished.
So you are right, there will probably never be a prosecution on that charge ever, as it is for specific, serious cases of child neglect, not letting little Johnny run amok on the streets at night.
Is this a news report or an editorial / opinion piece? As far as tactical weapons, bear cats and masked operators go? Ha ha, what is the go with the sensationalism of late? Aircraft dumping fuel all over us, gunned up SWAT teams?
Why not use the TRG, they are specifically trained for covert surveillance and they have the specialized tools. A bit like the reports of the intervention when some media made it sound like the army was rolling in with tanks and machine guns, where it was more like skilled defence force personnel in land cruisers assisting with infrastructure.
I appreciate the in depth reporting of issues around town, you really don’t need to follow the other trashy tabloids we get here.
[Hi Ray, The piece is clearly labelled as Comment. I also draw your attention to my response here to “Ged”. Erwin Chlanda, Editor.]


Public money flowing into facility about to be closed
Can’t see it being closed any time soon. The $100m facility in Darwin will only have 12 beds, there needs to be somewhere to put the rest. I reckon at least two years until we see a new one here.


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