@ Eli Melky (Posted January 19, 2017 at 7:36 am): …

Comment on Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain by Alex Nelson.

@ Eli Melky (Posted January 19, 2017 at 7:36 am): Eli Melky’s argument that building more commercial real estate to add to the glut of existing vacant premises will improve a prospective tenant’s “ability and leverage to negotiate a cheaper rent” might apply if normal market forces were in play.
However, I was informed some time ago that absentee landlords of vacant commercial premises in town are able to offset their losses in Alice Springs against income generated by properties they own in capital cities for taxation purposes.
Consequently there is no incentive to reduce rents in Alice Springs, and (for example) this is reflected in extraordinary rents charged for empty premises in Todd Mall which deters prospective businesses from opening new shops there.
Is this actually the case; and if so, what should be done about it?
I’m also informed that in other countries (such as New Zealand, I was told) owners of commercial properties that remain vacant for an extended period of time are penalized, and this naturally creates an incentive to reduce rental costs in order to attract business tenants.

Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

NT News interfered with reporting to protect ad income from NT Government: Allegation
This situation has been going on now for 30 years.
It commenced from July 1988 when the Centralian Advocate had the temerity to publish a scathing front page editorial after the CLP dumped Chief Minister Steve Hatton and replaced him with Marshall Perron.
This was the fourth leadership change in government in as many years and the Advocate didn’t pull its punches in its savage criticism of the CLP.
During this period the CLP was rocked by the resignation of Deputy CM Ray Hanrahan from all his portfolios and then from the CLP, finally resigning from politics in August 1988.
This was followed by the Flynn by-election of September 10, 1988, in which the CLP suffered a 21 % swing against it in what was formerly a safe seat.
It was clearly evident from this result that the CLP could no longer rely on any seat in the NT being safe and its hold on power was at great risk.
It was exactly at this time there was a sudden change of management of the Centralian Advocate, when accomplished reporter and long-serving editor Bob Watts was replaced by Gary Shipway and sent to do mostly court reporting for the NT News until his retirement in 2005.
(For his part, from about 1991 onwards, Shipway went on to serve as the chief media advisor to the CLP for many years – he is now a reporter for the NT News).
In the late 1980s the CLP cultivated extremely close relations with the management of News Corp in the NT, to both sides mutual advantage. It was a crucial factor for the success of the CLP during its “bonus decade” in power of the 1990s.
This situation has largely continued to the present day, with News Corp essentially prostituting itself to whichever political party happens to be in government; with the notable exception of the self-destructing Giles Government with which it was impossible to be seen in public support of it.
I am able to provide evidence to verify my claims. There is no doubt that the independence of the media in the Northern Territory (not just News Corp) has long been severely compromised to the overall detriment of good government of the Territory.


Telling the stories of war: we could do so much better
It’s worth noting that many of the plaques that “stud the walking path along the river” as a major component of the “Australian Armed Forces Commemorative Walk” might be described as “understated.”
Recently I walked along part of that pathway and found that many are now so faded they are barely legible.
All that public expense in their production and installation – only a little over two years ago – appears to be well on the way to being wasted.
Perhaps it’s in keeping with the demise of the RSL Club on the north side of Anzac Hill, which couldn’t sustain the attempt to revive its operation at the time. The whole exercise seems to have been badly mishandled.


To die for country
Two Centralian veterans of mixed race parentage, Harold and Milton Liddle, were prominent in the years following World War Two in highlighting the injustice to people who, such as themselves, who had fought in the war but were denied equal rights as citizens of Australia.
Together with another prominent Australian veteran, London-born Jim Bowditch, who from 1950 to early 1954 was the editor of the Centralian Advocate, they succeeded in gaining citizenship in 1953 for part-Aboriginal people and some full-bloods (the terminology then officially in use) in the Northern Territory.
This is an important part of Central Australian history that is largely overlooked.


Gunner ‘demotes’ Alice: art gallery options ‘lacklustre’
@ Ares Splicing (Posted January 14, 2018 at 12:58 pm): Pasted below is part of a comment in response to the story http://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/2017/11/02/recommendations-in-for-national-indigenous-art-gallery-site-in-alice/ posted the day prior to this story.
“I’m not enamoured of the proposals put forward by the steering committee for the National Indigenous Art Gallery, indeed to my mind it’s hard to avoid the conclusion we’ve been dudded and that it’s a ploy for this gallery to ultimately be built for the benefit of the Alice Springs Desert Park.
I’m deeply sceptical of what’s been offered to us to consider.” Wonder who it was that made that comment?
As for suggesting the Melanka site for the Indigenous Art Gallery, it was the same person who made the quote above who first suggested that site be consdered for an Aboriginal cultural centre in 2011. It was that comment (broadcast on ABC) that triggered this whole business.


Local government: A lot of action beyond the 3Rs
Sadly it would appear that Murray Bridge has just taken an enormous hit to its economy, with the news of a major industrial fire taking hold in the town’s abattoir.


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