Eli, It worries me that our council does not appear …

Comment on Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain by Fred.

Eli, It worries me that our council does not appear to be operating in the real world of Alice Springs
The local reaction to the development you have supported clearly demonstrates that.
Similarly your idea of a Polynesian cultural centre as in Hawaii is not going to happen here and frankly is absurd in our context.
One could write a book on the reasons for that.
So we need practical development that is based on our town and we need representatives with a firm and complete grasp of the local realities and sentiments.

Fred Also Commented

Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli You say that if the Polynesians can put on a cultural show, why cant we?
Well the cultural centre is far less ambitious that the spectacular Polynesian show.
So how’s it going?
Are you and the other members of council moving ahead with it?
Absolutely not from what I can see.
So why are you promoting an ambitious cultural show when, along with our other representatives, you can’t facilitate a cultural centre?
Stumbling with the baby steps while talking about running a marathon?
Running with an ambitious development while basic services are poor and very expensive?
Drifting away from the boring core functions of a council to run a political agenda?


Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
Eli you say that creating open space is good, but query how I would justify paying millions for buildings from private land owners to create this open space.
If open space is good why have you been supporting a development that destroys the best open space in the mall?
The most positive experience of Aboriginal people and culture many tourists get is through the painting sales on the Mall open space.
For many that is the sum total of their experience of another culture they have come half way around the world to meet.
I see positive interaction on the open space all the time.
Open space on the Mall is overdue to be revalued as a cultural meeting place for local Aboriginal people and tourists.
It is a tourist drawcard.
That’s how I would justify paying millions from the $30m the Council has to create more open space.


Council partnership in CBD complex seems certain
This proposal is ghastly, inappropriate and destroys the best part of the Mall.
It comes close on the heels of the monstrous law and order edifice, the new supreme court building.
Spend the $30m to control rate increases and to unwind development to bring some of our town’s soul back.
Perhaps acquire buildings near the mall to be demolished and turned into open space.
The new proposal should be put on hold until the next council election.
That way ratepayers will get a chance to vote according to the candidates’ disposition towards it.
It is a worry that our council appears to be chronically incapable of coming up with development concepts that enhance the livability of our town.


Recent Comments by Fred

Real estate: Desert Springs up, Larapinta down
A whopping 28.7% drop in the price of Rural Area properties: Take a drive around our industrialised rural area and the reason for the fall in value is obvious.
Lack of enforcement of planning regulations has allowed the trashing of our town’s rural area.


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
I wonder if it would be possible to do an audit of all Cert 1s and 2s completed in Central Australia?
It should be possible and it would be an eye opener and perhaps lead to a formal investigation into the institutional cheating that has been going on for many years.
I reckon there would be thousands of useless certificates out there that have cost governments tens of millions of dollars.
And every year there are hundreds more of them.
Perhaps certification will have to involve a process of formal examination by an independent authority?


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
@ John: From the institution’s point of view the problem is that a Cert 1 does not fund a literacy / numeracy program that could move a student from grade 2 to grade 8/9.
The grade 2 is the common entry point for many students, they are the product of a failed education system.
Grade 8/9 is about the level of a Cert 1 so that means six to seven years of schooling need to be bridged to get to a genuine Cert 1.
It’s simply not possible, if institutions tried they would go broke.
They know that so they don’t even try to remediate.
Instead they fudge.
It’s not just Batchelor, it’s every training organisation with Aboriginal students and the high schools are into it as well.
Their rationale for fudging is that the students are disadvantaged.
It’s easy to criticise but what’s the alternative?


With Gunner and Scullion, Batchelor doesn’t need Santa
84 students received Certificate I. Certificate III went to just 24 recipients.
That’s because Cert 1 is the top of the safe fudge level.
Cert 1s are handed out like lollies with tutors completing the work.
They are the bread and butter of training organisations in our town.
A fudged Cert 1 is safe, ASQA won’t investigate complaints about a lowly Cert 1.
Cert IIIs are more challenging to fudge, and more risky.
Imagine the scandal if Batchelor gave a Cert III to an illiterate student and was caught out by ASQA, e.g. a graduate could complain that he wasn’t taught properly and doesn’t have the skills he should have. Graduate teachers could complain they can’t get a job etc.
Students need to be marginally literate to be safely fudged for a Cert III and very few are.
Good on Yuedumu School for calling them on the pre completed work books.
We have a system where very large numbers of Aboriginal people of all ages have one or more Cert 1s, I know people with three or more.
Very few have qualifications that could get them a job or help them to keep a job.


Horror numbers in tourism stats, with a hint for a solution
Alice will keep going down in non Aboriginal numbers, both visitors and inhabitants, irrespective of a long term plan.
But absolute numbers could well grow.
There are many opportunities here including jobs for anyone who wants to work.
Age is no barrier to employment in our town.
Demand for education, health, and the trades will grow.
Schools in the town currently can’t attract sufficient numbers of qualified and experienced teachers from the NT or anywhere in the country.
There is an influx of new graduates from interstate and before long most teachers will be newly graduated.
The hospital has taken to recruiting from overseas so cultural diversity will be a strong trend.
Medical research is booming.
Tradies will be needed in increasing numbers.
Car sales will do well.
Police and security staff will be needed in increasing numbers.
Our town is inexorably headed for an unsettled future but its not all doom and gloom.


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