@ Frank Baarda (Posted April 18, 2017 at 9:17 am) …

Comment on They must be joking! by Alex Nelson.

@ Frank Baarda (Posted April 18, 2017 at 9:17 am) – Whoa, hang on a minute there, Frank – what’s wrong with rust? In recent years rust is all the rage, we’ve got rusty light poles lining the revamped Parsons Street and north end of Todd Street, and a rusty Greenwell Building built for bureaucracy in Bath Street. Not to mention a rusty mindset of so many who wisely work out how best to spend taxpayers’ dollars for not much benefit to most of us – no, I won’t mention that…
We’ve been wrong all along thinking the Territory’s official colours are black, white and ochre – it’s not ochre at all, it’s rust! So a rusty rabbit wouldn’t be out of place at all, indeed it’s got a certain metallic ring to it, I reckon.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

They must be joking!
@ Chris (Posted April 18, 2017 at 1:07 pm): A nicely ironic touch in your comment, Chris, as the “church on Wills Terrace” (the Catholic Church) was designed by architect Andy McPhee, which I understand was his favourite of the many projects he was involved in during his time in Alice Springs.
The irony (for me, at least) lies in the fact that the former Commonwealth Bank building that was demolished to make way for the new NT Supreme Court was also designed by Andy McPhee.
With regards to the “smart glass” insulation of the new Supreme Court – well, that doesn’t accord with information passed on to me that workers inside the building during construction found conditions extremely hot by 10 o’clock each morning.
I was also informed a few weeks ago that one of the glass panels was [damaged]. This one pane of glass (so I’m told) cost $28,000 to replace, due to having to be sourced from overseas and requiring a specialist from interstate to install it. Anybody able to verify this story?

[EdAlice Springs News Online put to Michael Sitzler questions about the building’s design features for temperature control and its energy efficiency, as well as about the cost to replace the allegedly damaged pane of glass. Mr Sitzler has not replied. – Erwin Chlanda, Editor]


They must be joking!
Given the whole sorry saga of this development, I’d suggest the addition of this peculiar example of public art is entirely appropriate in the circumstances.
The new edifice of the NT Supreme Court is extraordinarily symbolic of all that is wrong with our experiment in responsible self-government, with all its largely unaccountable intimate interaction with bureaucracy, business and the law.
However, far more relevant for me is the timing of this commercial development’s completion. I’ve pointed out previously that Alice Springs is a barometer of the economic climate, and this is most evident in the history of high rise development proposals and constructions in our town – it’s quite uncanny. Moreover, the greater the proposals or actual construction of high rise in Alice Springs the more severe is the economic recession associated with those occasions.
From my perspective this building is on target for heralding the next major economic recession. Irrespective of any assurances to the contrary given by politicians or economists, there appears to be an inexorable alignment of factors indicating that Australia’s national economy has become a house of cards.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Four dogs suspected poisoned with 1080
@ Ruth Weston (Posted September 7, 2018 at 1:08 pm): Sodium fluoroacetate is the commercially produced 1080 poison, and is closely related to potassium fluoroacetate, the poisonous chemical found in a wide variety of plant species.
Both chemicals have the same effect, disrupting the Krebs Cycle (or Citric Acid Cycle) which disrupts the ability of cells to metabolise carbohydrates, fats and proteins for energy production.
It was biochemist Ray Murray, based in Alice Springs with the Animal Industry Branch from 1954 to 1966, who first identified the naturally occurring 1080-based compound that occurs sporadically in poison Gidgee (Acacia georginae) which plagued the beef cattle industry in the east of Central Australia and across the Queensland border.


Stagnant CBD; industrial land, rental shortage; houses hold
The photo caption “The ANZ Bank has relocated from this prime Todd Street North site, opposite the Visitor Centre, to Gregory Terrace” serves – perhaps inadvertently – to emphasise the “moving of deckchairs” in the CBD, as the Visitor Centre itself was relocated to its present site a few years ago from its former Gregory Terrace location adjacent to the Civic Centre … and that particular building, the former Queen Elizabeth II Infant Welfare Clinic, that was heavily modified and opened to great fanfare in 1997 as the new Visitor Centre, remains steadfastly vacant.
Aside from the shift of the ANZ Bank (which, incidentally, opened its doors on its former Parsons Street site in August 1962, exactly 56 years ago) and the recent Wicked Kneads shop on the opposite corner now up for sale, there has also been the closure recently of two nearby hairdresser businesses, too – one of which was for sale for a long time but obviously attracted no serious interest.
Just yesterday, walking along Gregory Terrace, I was shocked to see “For lease” notices plastering the windows of La Casalinga restaurant, a long-standing business in this town and even something of an institution.
This town has weathered significant economic downturns on previous occasions – the mid 1970s, the late 1980s and early 1990s – but I’ve never seen the relocation of so many businesses (the “shifting of deckchairs”) on such a scale as has been occurring in recent years. It’s quite a phenomenon.
This situation is concurrent with the only significant new developments – the Green Well Building in Bath Street and the multi-storey Supreme Court building in Parsons Street – being occupied by government departments and instrumentalities, to the detriment of existing commercial lease stock in town. These developments, along with the re-opening of Todd Street North to traffic again, have done nothing to arrest the decline of the CBD, notwithstanding all the hype and propaganda of government and the private sector arguing in support of them.
Recent history quite clearly shows that the proposed National Indigenous Art Gallery will prove NOT to be the economic nirvana for this town. Exactly the same rationale was given for the developments of the casino almost four decades ago, the major hotel developments in the 1980s and the Alice Springs Desert Park in the 1990s – clearly none of these institutions, either on their own or altogether, have assisted in averting the current decline of our town, and there is no reason or evidence to show that the gallery will prove to be any different.
On the contrary, it will be yet another expensive long-term burden for the taxpayer to bear.


Town Council riven by conflict, lack of leadership
@ Alex Hope (Posted August 15, 2018 at 11:43 am): You may not be aware just how true is your remark “party politics have always been a part of the town council.”
Here is the slogan for one candidate in the first town council by-election (for two vacancies) for March 24, 1973: “THIS IS YOUR … ALP CANDIDATE IN SATURDAY’S COUNCIL ELECTION. VOTE 1 HADDON, D.J.”
As it turned out, Dennis Haddon came third in the poll on that occasion; however, when Alderman Paul Everingham resigned from the town council in early July 1973, instead of going to another by-election it was decided to appoint Dennis Haddon to replace him.
Anybody who knows the history of Territory politics will appreciate the irony – but wait, there’s more: When Paul Everingham stood as a candidate for the first town council election campaign in June 1971, his election advertisements were authorised by “Peter Edward John Gunner, Stuart Highway, Alice Springs”. Yes, it was current CM Michael Gunner’s grandfather.


Town Council riven by conflict, lack of leadership
Councillor Matt Paterson was nominated by Jamie de Brenni for the position of Deputy Mayor, which was seconded by Jimmy Cocking. Matt Patterson has stated this on ABC radio.


Indigenous gallery: Show me the money!
Hmm, whatever happened to the notion of RESPONSIBLE self-government?
Seems like we’re running off the rails. Federal intervention again, perhaps?


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