@ Frank Baarda (Posted April 18, 2017 at 9:17 am) …

Comment on They must be joking! by Alex Nelson.

@ Frank Baarda (Posted April 18, 2017 at 9:17 am) – Whoa, hang on a minute there, Frank – what’s wrong with rust? In recent years rust is all the rage, we’ve got rusty light poles lining the revamped Parsons Street and north end of Todd Street, and a rusty Greenwell Building built for bureaucracy in Bath Street. Not to mention a rusty mindset of so many who wisely work out how best to spend taxpayers’ dollars for not much benefit to most of us – no, I won’t mention that…
We’ve been wrong all along thinking the Territory’s official colours are black, white and ochre – it’s not ochre at all, it’s rust! So a rusty rabbit wouldn’t be out of place at all, indeed it’s got a certain metallic ring to it, I reckon.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

They must be joking!
@ Chris (Posted April 18, 2017 at 1:07 pm): A nicely ironic touch in your comment, Chris, as the “church on Wills Terrace” (the Catholic Church) was designed by architect Andy McPhee, which I understand was his favourite of the many projects he was involved in during his time in Alice Springs.
The irony (for me, at least) lies in the fact that the former Commonwealth Bank building that was demolished to make way for the new NT Supreme Court was also designed by Andy McPhee.
With regards to the “smart glass” insulation of the new Supreme Court – well, that doesn’t accord with information passed on to me that workers inside the building during construction found conditions extremely hot by 10 o’clock each morning.
I was also informed a few weeks ago that one of the glass panels was [damaged]. This one pane of glass (so I’m told) cost $28,000 to replace, due to having to be sourced from overseas and requiring a specialist from interstate to install it. Anybody able to verify this story?

[EdAlice Springs News Online put to Michael Sitzler questions about the building’s design features for temperature control and its energy efficiency, as well as about the cost to replace the allegedly damaged pane of glass. Mr Sitzler has not replied. – Erwin Chlanda, Editor]


They must be joking!
Given the whole sorry saga of this development, I’d suggest the addition of this peculiar example of public art is entirely appropriate in the circumstances.
The new edifice of the NT Supreme Court is extraordinarily symbolic of all that is wrong with our experiment in responsible self-government, with all its largely unaccountable intimate interaction with bureaucracy, business and the law.
However, far more relevant for me is the timing of this commercial development’s completion. I’ve pointed out previously that Alice Springs is a barometer of the economic climate, and this is most evident in the history of high rise development proposals and constructions in our town – it’s quite uncanny. Moreover, the greater the proposals or actual construction of high rise in Alice Springs the more severe is the economic recession associated with those occasions.
From my perspective this building is on target for heralding the next major economic recession. Irrespective of any assurances to the contrary given by politicians or economists, there appears to be an inexorable alignment of factors indicating that Australia’s national economy has become a house of cards.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Wards for Alice council, including one for town camps?
Wards for the Alice Springs Town Council are not a new idea but have never been supported by the NT Government.
There was discussion about wards in the mid-1990s, which was firmly rejected by the government.
It was also raised by candidate Steve Strike during the town council election campaign in May 1988. Like Eli Melky’s current proposal, Strike also suggested five wards, each with two aldermen; however, he didn’t overlook the rural area on that occasion over 30 years ago (the other wards suggested were for Eastside, Gillen, Braitling and the Gap Area).
The town’s municipal boundaries were expanded significantly in early 1988, incorporating the whole rural area for the first time despite widespread opposition from affected residents. The idea of a ward system was the final suggestion to differentiate the rural area from the town, after calls for a separate community government and a shire were rejected by the NT Government.
It’s interesting to note that during the operation of the original Alice Springs Progress Association from 1947 to 1960, the town was divided into wards a couple of times for choosing delegates onto the association. The wards were the (now old) Eastside, town centre (now the CBD), the south side of the town, and the Farm Area along what is now Ragonesi Road. The town’s population grew from about 2000 to over 3000 residents during this period, which was long before there was a town council.
One person who represented the south ward from 1958 onwards was Bernie Kilgariff, kickstarting what was to become an illustrious career in NT politics.
Personally I support the concept of wards; for one thing, it would substantially reduce the cost and inconvenience of town council by-elections.
With regard to increasing the number of councillors from eight to 10; well, it’s just over a decade ago the reverse occurred.
Moreover, the ASTC first started off with eight aldermen (plus the mayor) in 1971 until 1977, when the number was increased to 10.
Here we go again?


Move School of the Air to Anzac High building
@ Watch’n (Posted April 15, 2019 at 4:48 am): Remember when the Drive-in was de-listed? To make way for real estate? Wasn’t that a great development.


Gallery fiasco: school heritage process ‘massively flawed’
It’s obvious the majority of voters in Araluen got it right in the last Territory election campaign.


Killerbots, guided by Pine Gap, same as any other weapon?
Humanity is becoming too clever for its own good.


Save Anzac Hill High School: National Trust
@ James T Smerk (Posted March 28, 2019 at 11:48 am): I’ve said it before a number of times, I’ll say it again: The old high school complex on the Anzac Reserve has the richest heritage value of any education campus in the Northern Territory.
Its historical value is very high, and exceeded in Central Australia only by the Alice Springs Telegraph Station, the Hermannsburg Historic Precinct, and Arltunga (which last is actually NOT heritage listed).


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