@ Chris (Posted April 18, 2017 at 1:07 pm): A …

Comment on They must be joking! by Alex Nelson.

@ Chris (Posted April 18, 2017 at 1:07 pm): A nicely ironic touch in your comment, Chris, as the “church on Wills Terrace” (the Catholic Church) was designed by architect Andy McPhee, which I understand was his favourite of the many projects he was involved in during his time in Alice Springs.
The irony (for me, at least) lies in the fact that the former Commonwealth Bank building that was demolished to make way for the new NT Supreme Court was also designed by Andy McPhee.
With regards to the “smart glass” insulation of the new Supreme Court – well, that doesn’t accord with information passed on to me that workers inside the building during construction found conditions extremely hot by 10 o’clock each morning.
I was also informed a few weeks ago that one of the glass panels was [damaged]. This one pane of glass (so I’m told) cost $28,000 to replace, due to having to be sourced from overseas and requiring a specialist from interstate to install it. Anybody able to verify this story?

[EdAlice Springs News Online put to Michael Sitzler questions about the building’s design features for temperature control and its energy efficiency, as well as about the cost to replace the allegedly damaged pane of glass. Mr Sitzler has not replied. – Erwin Chlanda, Editor]

Alex Nelson Also Commented

They must be joking!
@ Frank Baarda (Posted April 18, 2017 at 9:17 am) – Whoa, hang on a minute there, Frank – what’s wrong with rust? In recent years rust is all the rage, we’ve got rusty light poles lining the revamped Parsons Street and north end of Todd Street, and a rusty Greenwell Building built for bureaucracy in Bath Street. Not to mention a rusty mindset of so many who wisely work out how best to spend taxpayers’ dollars for not much benefit to most of us – no, I won’t mention that…
We’ve been wrong all along thinking the Territory’s official colours are black, white and ochre – it’s not ochre at all, it’s rust! So a rusty rabbit wouldn’t be out of place at all, indeed it’s got a certain metallic ring to it, I reckon.


They must be joking!
Given the whole sorry saga of this development, I’d suggest the addition of this peculiar example of public art is entirely appropriate in the circumstances.
The new edifice of the NT Supreme Court is extraordinarily symbolic of all that is wrong with our experiment in responsible self-government, with all its largely unaccountable intimate interaction with bureaucracy, business and the law.
However, far more relevant for me is the timing of this commercial development’s completion. I’ve pointed out previously that Alice Springs is a barometer of the economic climate, and this is most evident in the history of high rise development proposals and constructions in our town – it’s quite uncanny. Moreover, the greater the proposals or actual construction of high rise in Alice Springs the more severe is the economic recession associated with those occasions.
From my perspective this building is on target for heralding the next major economic recession. Irrespective of any assurances to the contrary given by politicians or economists, there appears to be an inexorable alignment of factors indicating that Australia’s national economy has become a house of cards.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Town planning farce: Lawler dodges the hard questions
This encounter instantly reminded me of a passage in George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four” when Winston Smith followed an old man into a pub with the intention of finding out from him what life was like before the revolution that led to the rise of Big Brother.
Yet no matter how earnestly he asked the old man to recall the early years of his life, “Winston had the feeling they were talking at cross-purposes.”
He kept on prodding the old man for information but “a sense of helplessness took hold of Winston. The old man’s memory was nothing but a rubbish-heap of details. One could question him all day without getting any real information.”
Plying the old man with beer, he tried one more time but failed: “Winston sat back against the window sill. It was no use going on. He was about to buy some more beer when the old man suddenly got up and shuffled rapidly into the stinking urinal at the side of the room. The extra half-litre was already working on him. Winston sat for a minute or two gazing at his empty glass, and hardly noticed when his feet carried him out into the street again.”
Welcome to the Big Brother reality of honest accountable government in the Northern Territory!


Student boarding funding restored – for now
Isn’t that something? A minister of the NT Government has listened to concerns about a government decision, and reversed it in a day.
Little aggravation, and great relief for many, I should think.
Minister Selena Uibo has set a fine example – now, if only certain others of her colleagues would take notice of public concern about the NT Government’s poor decision-making over the location of the proposed National Aboriginal Art Gallery…


Remains of missing man found near Yambah
@ John Bell (Posted September 20, 2018 at 10:21 pm): The skeleton was identified, a young man only recently arrived in Alice Springs in 1965. It’s believed he was a victim of an accidental discharge of his rifle, not a suicide.


Ring a bell?
Is it just me, or is it the case that the “Boundless Possible” embarrassment has suffered a swift death, consigned quietly to the wheelie bin of history?
Ah yes, a government elected into office that promised us all greater standards of honesty and accountability; but no, it’s just business as usual, that we’ve long endured for decades in the Northern Territory.
It really makes no difference who’s in charge.


Four dogs suspected poisoned with 1080
@ Ruth Weston (Posted September 7, 2018 at 1:08 pm): Sodium fluoroacetate is the commercially produced 1080 poison, and is closely related to potassium fluoroacetate, the poisonous chemical found in a wide variety of plant species.
Both chemicals have the same effect, disrupting the Krebs Cycle (or Citric Acid Cycle) which disrupts the ability of cells to metabolise carbohydrates, fats and proteins for energy production.
It was biochemist Ray Murray, based in Alice Springs with the Animal Industry Branch from 1954 to 1966, who first identified the naturally occurring 1080-based compound that occurs sporadically in poison Gidgee (Acacia georginae) which plagued the beef cattle industry in the east of Central Australia and across the Queensland border.


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