@ Careful with that $, Eugene (Posted April 18, 2017 …

Comment on Alice Easter 88 years after the altar arrived by Alex Nelson.

@ Careful with that $, Eugene (Posted April 18, 2017 at 5:18 pm): As far as I know, Fr Meaney is still going strong. The last time I saw him he was a co-celebrant of the state funeral for Bernie Kilgariff in April 2010.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

Alice Easter 88 years after the altar arrived
@ Jim Brown (Posted April 22, 2017 at 12:10 pm): You must be referring to another occasion, Jim. The event I witnessed was long before the casino was operating, and what I described is what occurred. You were not the person to speak out on the occasion I witnessed.
Here are some facts: Fr Adrian Meaney departed Alice Springs on Sunday, March 15, 1981; the Alice Springs Federal Casino was officially opened on Thursday, July 9, 1981, and amongst its attractions on offer were the first poker machines in the town.
This shows your claim that “the casino was already in operation for some time” when Fr Meaney lectured the congregation on the evils of gambling cannot possibly be correct.
On the day prior to the casino’s opening a letter from the local Ministers Fraternal was published in the newspaper entitled “Casino will hurt many families” and amongst the signatories were three Catholic priests, they were Fr Kingston Summerhayes, Fr Pat Dodson (now a senator for WA), and Fr Dennis Murphy (who replaced Fr Meaney earlier that year).
There was much opposition to the introduction of pokies in Alice Springs including from the Town Council (notably Mayor George Smith, who feared their spread to other clubs in town); and a citizen at the time who also strongly opposed their introduction was Fran Kilgariff.


Alice Easter 88 years after the altar arrived
I was at the mass when Fr Adrian Meaney took Chief Minister Paul Everingham to task over the prospect of a casino being established in Alice Springs. This happened one Sunday in 1979 as I recall, and Everingham was in the congregation.
Fr Meaney was a staunch opponent of the casino and didn’t hold back his criticism during his sermon; however, Everingham was having none of this and stood up and gave as good as he got.
The argument raged to and fro for several minutes until someone else had enough and yelled out to shut up and get on with the mass.
That would have to be one of the most memorable church services I’ve ever attended.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Former gallery advisor scathing about its planners
What’s the betting that old sign is going to do a rapid vanishing act?
Perhaps I should nominate it for heritage listing, pronto!


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ John Bell (Posted December 3, 2018 at 2:49 pm): I don’t agree with you this time, John.
Here’s part of a comment I’ve made on another media website: “A lot of food for thought from this post. My earliest recollections of politics dates from the dying days of the McMahon Government which, ironically perhaps, was a time of great progress and optimism in the Northern Territory. It capped a time of extraordinary economic and population growth in the NT from the late 1960s onwards (when McMahon was the federal Treasurer), notwithstanding the contemporary mythology now of several decades standing (justifying NT Self-government) that this was the “bad old days” of Commonwealth control and mismanagement”.
@ Edan Baxter (Posted December 3, 2018 at 11:05 am): I have a quote for you, too: “As you say, the agreement made on 7 December 1907 between the Commonwealth and South Australia for the surrender of the Northern Territory to the Commonwealth is still in force” (Letter from NT Attorney-General, Daryl W. Manzie, 26 May, 1992). This still remains the case.
Incidentally, it was this letter from Daryl Manzie that first triggered my interest in Territory history; and what I realised after some time back then is that all is not well with the legal basis of self-government of the NT.
Hence my allusion to section 44 of the Australian Constitution and pointing out the Statute of Limitations does not apply to constitutional law in a recent comment: http://www.alicespringsnews.com.au/2018/11/20/code-of-conduct-allegations-vexatious-frivolous-councillor/#comment-1802265


Happy Birthday, Auntie, and good luck for the next 70.
The ABC ranks along with the CSIRO as the two great Commonwealth institutions of Australia, both of which have made immense contributions and are amongst our nation’s most important assets.
These two organisations set bench marks against which all else in their respective fields are compared.
It is good to know that at least one of these organisations continues to flourish in Alice Springs.


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ John Bell (Posted December 2, 2018 at 11:13 pm): Entirely agree with you, John, except for your final sentence. It’s an old line that the NT’s “exceptional” circumstances of population and geography justify self-government.
After 40 years there is more than abundant evidence demonstrating that the criticisms you direct at the ACT apply equally well to the NT.


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ John Bell (Posted December 1, 2018 at 8:21 am): It’s worth recalling that the ACT had a referendum on the question of self-government in 1978 but almost two-thirds of the electors voted against it, preferring instead to maintain the arrangement of a House of Assembly which was simply an advisory body to the Department of the Capital Territory.
Notwithstanding that result, a decade later the ACT got self-government irrespective of whether anyone agreeed to it or not.
@ Psuedo Guru (Posted November 30, 2018 at 8:09 am): Your comment may be much closer to the mark than anyone realises.


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