We need people living in the CBD to bring more …

Comment on Making the CBD vibrant, again: Detail, please. by Alex Hope.

We need people living in the CBD to bring more life there and create the safety provided by numbers of people on the streets.
Government could help by policy decisions which encourage this.
Local government could help by modifying the rating regime to encourage part-residential buildings in the CBD.

Recent Comments by Alex Hope

All views about gallery location will be considered: Lauren Moss
Yes indeed, there needs to be an Aboriginal consensus about the site.
If the CBD is to be revitaliised it needs people living in it, a gallery open 10-4 will not do much, permanent residents will do a lot more.
What about the old drive-in?
Pros and cons anyone?


Council: fob off, rejection, and secret moves
Could someone please explain why the civic centre site would be better than the Melanka site?
Have we finished paying for the $10M rebuild of the Council chambers yet?
Knocking it down, building a new civic center at ANZAC high school, compared to starting from a clean site at Melanka….how does it make sense?
What’s more, is any one remembering that the traditional owners objected not only to ANZAC oval being the site, but they said that for cultural reasons a national gallery should be sited south of the Gap. I still don’t understand how a government that is supposedly respectful of Aboriginal culture, that wants to build a gallery to celebrate said culture, then intends to ride roughshod over said Aboriginal culture in siting a gallery?
As our Seppo friends say: “go figure”.


$20m gated community proposed for Pine Gap staff
I thought our public housing policy was to disperse minority groups around the suburbs and not to create a ghetto. Why should it be different for these public housing tenants?


Massive gas reserves close to being tapped
@ Dave Richards: Actuaries are not generally noted for being one-eyed greenies, but they seem to agree that extreme weather events are increasing in frequency, and insurance companies are already increasing premiums in consequence.


Bringing Arrernte language into town signage
@Michael Dean
Have you considered that helping Arrernte people to increase their self esteem by publicly recognising their culture might be part of helping to reduce crime?
Is the prevalence of crime not related to the marginalisation and inequality they experience?
From your surname it would appear that your heritage might be from the UK. Here is an example of how, even there, recognition of a distinct language and culture is seen as fundamental to people’s sense of self.
https://www.itv.com/news/2017-09-04/back-to-school-but-not-an-english-one/

Can you imagine how you would be feeling about your own native language now, had the Japanese successfully invaded and colonised Australia in 1943, and you had been born and brought up speaking English at home but being educated in Japanese?

Is it not true that unless and until we can learn to imagine what is is like to walk in the other person’s shoes, we will never engage with them effectively in resolving our differences.


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