Maya, just remember that it is not just for the …

Comment on Supreme Court – the inside story by Bob.

Maya, just remember that it is not just for the 25000 or so people left in Alice Springs. The jurisdiction of this court is everywhere from Tennant Creek south to the border, and also from the QLD to the WA border. There can now be appeals heard in Alice Springs.
Anybody has ever done jury duty would know that the existing facility was way too small.
I had a tour through this building and the facilities are sensational. We might have a small population, but we do have a massive crime problem, there is no denying that, so we should have facilities to be able to deal with that. Hopefully it might mean people spend less time on remand and cases get processed faster.
Reflecting on the previous story on the open spaces near the old court, I found it really quite sad at the comments made by Ms. Collins though. It seems she is quite happy to accept that she must run around after her clients, “waving her arms frantically” to tell people on the court lawns that they are ready to appear in court. Surely if you had to appear in the Supreme Court, you would be nervously waiting in the foyer, as you would be terrified of not being there when called? This comment seems to indicate to me a total lack of interest and consequently a lack of respect for the whole legal process. It seems from this attitude that they are really quite used to the process. Looking at the number of Indigenous in jail, it could be the opposite of the common opinions expressed here, in that our local Indigenous population is not alienated at all by the process, having has such close contact with it for coming on to three generations now, that instead of treating it with fear of a foreign concept, it has become one of indifference. I tend to think a non-indigenous family having their first contact with the criminal justice system, through a moment of stupidity of their child, who would be far more fearful and terrified of being in such an imposing building representing something completely foreign to them.
It was also interesting that Russell Goldflam objected to mandatory sentencing, saying it alluded to the fact that the judges could not be trusted to give an appropriate sentence. I agree with Russell on that. I think mandatory sentencing is brought about by the fact that some of the sentences handed down were so out of touch with community standards, that a basic minimum had to be passed by legislators to reflect what was expected by the community.

Recent Comments by Bob

Traditional owners unite to dump Anzac as gallery site
@ Janet: yes, we have heard you over and over again, however this is the issue. In siting the gallery in the Anzac oval “precinct” the Oval will need to be redesigned, and as such we will lose the ability to use it as it has been used for many, many years.
The gallery will not be on the fields as they are now, we get that, but those fields will be respurposed as a green space with trees, making it unsuitable for football, or events such as the opening and closing ceremonies of the biggest sporting event this town has.
So, in answer to your question, the government provided plans, as well as the offer to spend even more money it does not have on new playing fields, is irrefutable evidence the oval will no longer be able to be used as it is currently, and the only reason for that is the proposed gallery.
This is the argument the people are putting forward. You are splitting hairs with semantics.
It is not difficult to understand. It seems that the point is now moot anyway, as the TOs have now refused permission.


National Indigenous Art Gallery future in doubt: Gunner
Shame the TOs seem to follow the wants of the people more so than the government. I bet Gunner is relieved about this.


GST slice-up rooted in historic wrongs
Great example Evelyne, unfortunatly many people scoff at you when you use an example like this, as those from outside the Territory simply don’t believe it.
A good article by Bob, however his statement in relation to the concept of Terra Nullius intrigues me. Is that what he is referring to as a lie?
The concept goes back to the Roman legal principle of Res Nullius, and the concept can also be attributed to the Papal Decree of the Doctrine of Discovery.
It is also referred to in the Mabo decision so although it may be an uncomfortable doctrine, it certainly can’t be referred to as a lie. Apart from that, a very good read.


Police seek information after attacks on two women
Would be good to know if the second offender was of Aboriginal appearance as well as the first offender. Seems odd they would mention one offenders race and not the other. It is either relevant or not.
[ED – We’re seeking a response from the police.]


The forgotten lesson: Take tough decisions now or borrow against tomorrow into unmanageable debt
I have been here for more that twenty years and always thought I had a decent understanding of NT Politics. This article is so well written I reckon it should be taught in any NT school that does Civics in year 9 or 10. What an in depth review of our Parliment since self government, showing how so many aspects are behind the scenes that we, as normal citizens, could not hope to know. This, combined with the letter to the the editor of today’s NT news by John Elferink, paints a stark picture of the future of the NT.

Thank you Alex for your analysis, how about a book? a Brief History of the NT?


Be Sociable, Share!