“Justice Pepper says she was a member of the tender …

Comment on Fracking probe head rejects suggestion advisors may be compromised by Charlie Carter.

“Justice Pepper says she was a member of the tender assessment panel: Assessment was made using criteria of price, local content, capacity, timeliness, scope specific as well as past performance, all of which were outlined in the public tender document that was released.”
What about concern for the environment, consideration of global warming, potential harm to the water etc?
And without casting any aspersions at all, who is Justice Pepper, and what qualifications does she bring to the enquiry?

Recent Comments by Charlie Carter

Anzac Precinct: govt declines to play ball, confusion reigns
Erwin, at this point one has to ask “cui bono” (who benefits?)
It is hard to imagine that a Government would behave in such a pig-headed, stupid, financially irresponsible way (well, maybe not so hard).
So I have to ask, what don’t we know about their motives for this?
Surely it can’t be the nonsense of “rejuvenating the north end of the mall”.
What else is at play here?


Define gallery purpose before picking a site: Bruce Walker
Bruce Walker says the National Aboriginal Art Gallery (NAAG) should:-
• Have a singularly spectacular iconic structure; a built form that is compelling in its own right, in a unique location that unites, inspires and excites all. It needs to stand out internationally.
• Be at the heart of the inland capital (at the very centre of town physically, socially and spiritually).
I see these as a contradiction.
I cannot envisage this proposed development anywhere other than situated in the landscape of Central Australia, either north or south of The Gap.
Definitely not tucked away in the town, in the midst of the whitefella built environment.
He also says:
• Art and Culture are inseparable – they are expressions of the history and the future of Aboriginal people.
Yet he does not address the issue of the co-location of the Aboriginal Cultural Centre with the NAAG. Probably because they could not easily co-exist in the “physical centre of town”.
I agree with most of the points raised by Bruce, but his conclusion does not follow from the gist of his argument. Perhaps, as Alex Hope suggests, he also has an agenda to “revitalise the CBD”.
His comment that “the Desert Park appears to be too far out of the CBD to achieve the purpose of the investment and the centrality of Aboriginal Art and Culture to the concept of the Inland capital”
is not valid.
I suggest that the Desert Park itself is already part of the “inland capital”.


Wakefield insists on Anzac Oval, ignores majority
The first problem is the Government’s starting point.
“Revitalising the Mall” should be irrelevant to the site of the gallery.
The consultants envisaged a space, an environment, a backdrop where the gallery can be an icon, a feature in itself.
Not a bloody attempt to do something to the north end of the Mall which, by the way, can only be done by turning the Plaza inside out. Put a big verandah on the Mall side and open the shops to it.
I was originally in favour of the Melanka site, but realised that it is as short sighted as the Anzac site.
It needs guts and determination to something truly visionary, like MONA.
And Dale, it is time to speak the truth to power, and tell Gunner to get stuffed. Resign from the ministry if necessary. Stick up for Alice.
The laws of history suggest that you have bugger all chance of holding your seat at the next election.
You may as well make the most of it. Go down fighting for your town, and for a really important contribution to Indigenous Australia.


A bridge too far? A tunnel may be the answer.
There is another road tunnel through a hill near Byron Bay on the north coast of NSW.
The M1 motorway goes through it. I estimate it is about 200m long.
I take the discussion seriously, or at least parts of it, with the primary purpose being to open up The Gap again to improve the flood flow.
Even 30% seems worthwhile, and the cost benefit should be able to be calculated, and compared with other flood mitigation proposals.
However, the concept of allowing flood water through the tunnels is ridiculous.
One of the important functions would be to ensure N-S access for emergencies during floods.
Rod Cramer is correct that Honeymoon Gap would also be impassable in a flood event.
I don’t agree with Domenico that ideas should not be discussed, but he seems to be confusing discussion of an idea (this) with discussion of a Government proposal (the gallery).
Any serious look at the future of Alice would not project a great population increase. “Industrial Development” just ain’t gunna happen.
Two lanes of road in one tunnel, and the railway in another (perhaps with an emergency road lane beside it) in another should suffice.
To write off Aboriginal approval seems premature, given that The Gap would be freed of its main desecrations.
Of course it will never be pristine, Alex, but it would be a hell of a lot better.
Dr Ongo, of course the river slows and spreads, you would expect that once it is free of The Gap squeeze.
Research by Water Resources in the 80s showed that bed level causeways have little effect on flow.


1968, when revolution was everybody’s business
@ Russell: My piece was, and was intended to be a personal memoir.
Erwin said keep it tight. I tried to.
I concentrated on Aboriginal Rights, anti war and conscription, the environment, and sexual liberation.
Of course I was aware of, and involved in the peace and love thing to some extent, but it was not a priority.
Erwin chose to illustrate the piece with a picture of the Beatles. That was not my decision, or my focus.
Your initial comment included “Love is All You Need humanist fairy story”.
I understand that you have a religious perspective, and were responding to my “supernatural fairy story” comment.
But the love is all you need story was not in my piece. I consider that tendentious.
Also you wrote “You didn’t mention the Vietnam War either”.
I wrote two paragraphs on the Vietnam war.
You have sprayed your comments over a wide field, and seem to attribute everything you dislike to
“the moral relativism of the front line revolutionaries”.
I’m not sure what you mean by that, but our stance that conscription was wrong, and that the Vietnam war was immoral, geopolitically stupid, and based on lies was not relativism.
I also had to register for the ballot for National Service.
The Vietnam war was lost.
The Dominos have not fallen.
The “yellow peril” has not overrun Australia.
I could go on.
But, you say,”I’m more interested in postmodern analysis of that legacy”.
Go for it, but leave me out.


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