It is time and hopefully quickly. We are now the only …

Comment on First Nations want a ‘Voice’ enshrined in the constitution by Evelyne Roullet.

It is time and hopefully quickly.
We are now the only Commonwealth nation that does not have a treaty with its Indigenous peoples. Rather than building our country on the idea of a partnership with Aboriginal people, our laws have sought to exclude and discriminate against them.
The idea of a treaty goes back many years. The failure to enter into a treaty was lamented in the early days of the Australian colonies. For example, the governor of Van Diemen’s Land, George Arthur, presided over a period of great conflict known as the Black War and in 1832 remarked that it was “a fatal error . . . that a treaty was not entered into” with the Aboriginal people of that island.
Positive change in Australia depends on Aboriginal people having more control over their lives. Improvements in education, employment and quality of life must be achieved by policies and programs owned and developed by the people affected.
Success cannot be imposed from Canberra. The hard work must be done by Aboriginal people; but decisions have often been imposed on Aboriginal people by parliaments and governments lacking even a single Indigenous member.
In the words of Prime Minister Keating at Redfern 10/12/1992:
“We have to acknowledge that pre-1788, this land was as Aboriginal then as it is Australian now and until we have acknowledged that, we will be an incomplete nation and a torn people.”….

“Isn’t it reasonable to say that if we can build a prosperous and remarkably harmonious multicultural society in Australia, surely we can find just solutions to the problems which beset the first Australians – the people to whom the most injustice has been done.”

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

First Nations want a ‘Voice’ enshrined in the constitution
Surprised! I do agree with you but to a certain point: total equality does not exist, as we all have different needs; but ALL “to have the same rights” does.
I give one example that really touch me and upset me: My husband has a very good army friend, together they fought for this country in Borneo, in Malaysia and in Vietnam.
This friend with his children and grand children regularly visit us, we have BBQ few drinks and fun. Alas, he cannot reciprocate, because he is an Aborigine who live in a CAMP. Equality? Same rights?
Let’s start by giving the Aborigine a voice then we can have a look to needs and distribution of money.
Money from taxpayers should be distributed accordingly to needs not by ethnicity or past history.


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

Police want parents to stop youth crime
Billy de Goat and James T Smerk: I know and understand, but I still think it is not normal and sad. It used to be enough to write after our name “Opinions are my own and not the views of my employer”. A pseudo means: “I have an opinion but not if it means that I get fired.”


Crunch time in Anzac Oval standoff
If the art centre / gallery is built on Anzac Oval, it will join the list of disappointing tourist attractions across the globe.
One I am particularly familiar with is the site of the pyramids in Egypt.
Travellers moaned that the Pyramids of Giza site can be seen from Pizza Hut, and are so close to the noise and chaos of the city (I could see them from my hotel).
They are flanked on three sides by the roads and neighbourhoods of Giza.
The same goes for the Great Sphinx.
Most of the photos taken of the pyramids in Giza are from a certain angle or from fairly close up, making them seem like they’re in the middle of the Egyptian desert.
In reality however, they’re really on the edge of the sands and practically in a few people’s backyards.
Welcome to Alice Springs, the Aborigines’ Art Center of Australia with no atural backdrop (I wonder what will be the scenic photo used for publicity?) but supermarkets, Plaza, coffee shops, war memorial, pubs.


Police want parents to stop youth crime
Yes Paul, but fear gives power to bullying, and the hooligans of our society.
The children in our streets are big bullies who know we will not punish them by fear of being labelled racists.


Police want parents to stop youth crime
I agree with Aranda Elder, about the lack of respect of the kids vandalising our town. Respect for others is very important, but respect for oneself is fundamental since we will value others to the extent that we are able to value ourself.
If we don’t respect ourselves we will not be respected by others either, and we cannot teach respect to others.
Thus I started to wonder about all anonymous writers on Alice Online, as there are more anonymous writers than normal names: do they have self respect?
It is essential to feel safe, to be able to express ourselves without fear of being judged, humiliated or discriminated against.
If you’re presenting a controversial opinion, you should be willing to defend it.
If you’re writing in a genre you fear others won’t respect, keep in mind that this is their problem, not yours.
And finally, if you’re writing material that you feel ashamed of, it’s probably better to change the material than to change your name.


Gallery: Council did not say boo
Well said Louise and I believe that all involve in NT Government and Town Council should read the book of Kathleen Kemaree Wallace, Listen deeply.
Deep listening means to hear every dimension of the other person, both what is said as well as what is implied.
It means to hear the words and the emotions underneath them and to hear the general disposition and mood of the person: To hear all of it.
Kathleen is the senior artist for the art centre and over the last 20 years has mentored and supported other women artists and young women.
She is internationally regarded and her artworks can be found in many major Australian Collections.
Two years ago, over 100 non-Indigenous people from across Australia gathered at the Edge of the Sacred conference at White Gums at Honeymoon Gap, outside of Alice Springs, to hear Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann and others speak about the spiritual road to reconciliation with Aboriginal people.
Dr Miriam-Rose Ungunmerr (AO) is an Aboriginal elder from Nauiyu (Daly River), where she served for many years as the principal of the local Catholic primary school. She is a renowned artist, activist, writer and public speaker.
Rather than speak of treaties and politics, Miriam Rose, shared the concept of quiet meditation, an Indigenous practice that her people use to find out who they really are, their purpose, and where they are going.
Obviously none of our politicians took much notice.


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