It is time and hopefully quickly. We are now the only …

Comment on First Nations want a ‘Voice’ enshrined in the constitution by Evelyne Roullet.

It is time and hopefully quickly.
We are now the only Commonwealth nation that does not have a treaty with its Indigenous peoples. Rather than building our country on the idea of a partnership with Aboriginal people, our laws have sought to exclude and discriminate against them.
The idea of a treaty goes back many years. The failure to enter into a treaty was lamented in the early days of the Australian colonies. For example, the governor of Van Diemen’s Land, George Arthur, presided over a period of great conflict known as the Black War and in 1832 remarked that it was “a fatal error . . . that a treaty was not entered into” with the Aboriginal people of that island.
Positive change in Australia depends on Aboriginal people having more control over their lives. Improvements in education, employment and quality of life must be achieved by policies and programs owned and developed by the people affected.
Success cannot be imposed from Canberra. The hard work must be done by Aboriginal people; but decisions have often been imposed on Aboriginal people by parliaments and governments lacking even a single Indigenous member.
In the words of Prime Minister Keating at Redfern 10/12/1992:
“We have to acknowledge that pre-1788, this land was as Aboriginal then as it is Australian now and until we have acknowledged that, we will be an incomplete nation and a torn people.”….

“Isn’t it reasonable to say that if we can build a prosperous and remarkably harmonious multicultural society in Australia, surely we can find just solutions to the problems which beset the first Australians – the people to whom the most injustice has been done.”

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

First Nations want a ‘Voice’ enshrined in the constitution
Surprised! I do agree with you but to a certain point: total equality does not exist, as we all have different needs; but ALL “to have the same rights” does.
I give one example that really touch me and upset me: My husband has a very good army friend, together they fought for this country in Borneo, in Malaysia and in Vietnam.
This friend with his children and grand children regularly visit us, we have BBQ few drinks and fun. Alas, he cannot reciprocate, because he is an Aborigine who live in a CAMP. Equality? Same rights?
Let’s start by giving the Aborigine a voice then we can have a look to needs and distribution of money.
Money from taxpayers should be distributed accordingly to needs not by ethnicity or past history.


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

Alice among nine cities on pilot academy shortlist
“The academy management team will visit these nine cities in coming weeks and meet with community leaders, suppliers and airport operators to further evaluate the feasibility of each location.”
Fingers crossed that nobody will object, no bickering and a unified town will welcome the visitors.


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@ Chris2: I have no opinion on the subject, because I do not have the facts.
However, I know that if you have to insult or mock someone, you should have the guts to use your name.
If you cannot, zip the lip.


‘You can make fracking better but you can’t do it well’
Pity he did not follow the same pattern for the National Aboriginal Gallery.


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GUNNER: Every consultation we have done shows the CBD location is the preferred location, and that’s the only location that offers a sense of place and has the space to be able to do it.
Why not proving it to us and shut our mouths by have a petition signed, names and address, instead of spending money and time with a cup of coffee? It will be easy then to see once for all where the majority lies.


Gallery: Gunner sticks with ANZAC Oval
The saga of the “gallery” could be played on the Totem theater’s stage in three acts: Drama, farce, and tragedy.
• Drama – any situation or series of events having vivid, emotional, conflicting, or striking interest or results.
• Farce – comedy in which everything is absolutely absurd. This usually involves some kind of deception or miscommunication.
Farces are popular because they develop in a way that seems more or less realistic, despite the fact that the results are highly improbable.
That is, the characters make decisions that seem to make some sense given the circumstances, but at every turn things get more and more ridiculous
• Tragedy traditionally portrays the protagonist’s fall from high authority or renown to ruin, often predetermined by fate or driven by a tragic flaw. I am waiting for the curtain’s fall.


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