It is a while since I’ve been to Tnorala (Gosse …

Comment on Loop Road heading towards jobs by Charlie Carter.

It is a while since I’ve been to Tnorala (Gosse Bluff) but it is a registered sacred site.
This will surely place limitations on it in regard to major earthworks such as a sealed road.
The road also follows a creek bed to pass into the inside of the impact structure. The same limitations surely apply to it as to the Palm Valley track, although on a smaller scale.
As for the caravaners, they could unhook their vans and leave them at the main road for a trip into Tnorola. Perhaps there could be a parking area for this.

Charlie Carter Also Commented

Loop Road heading towards jobs
Erwin, a further clarification.
You wrote: “Are you saying the access road to Palm Valley in such poor condition because it is a sacred site?”
No! Look at the sentence as a whole: “The road also follows a creek bed to pass into the inside of the impact structure. The same limitations surely apply to it as to the Palm Valley track, although on a smaller scale.”
To be absolutely clear, the limitation is because both run along a watercourse.
As a further thought, perhaps with the consent of the TOs, the parking area suggested could be a “bush” camping ground. Just VIP (ventilation improved pit) dunnies, bring everything else, like Redbank.
It could be a great experience, and a programmed stopover on the loop. Park the van, or the 2WD, set up camp, walk into the impact structure, perhaps watching the sunset. Stay the night in the campground, and see the sunrise on the outer rim in the morning.
Next stop the camp ground at Ntaria, leave the 2WD vehicle (or the van) there and take the day trip into Palm valley.


Loop Road heading towards jobs
G’Day Erwin,
I did not say, or imply most of the things you attributed to me. I was raising some facts that may have had a bearing on the decision.
It would be good to hear what the Traditional Owners have to say. I recollect that the access to the interior was intended to be low key and limited.
Rather than the bold suggestion that the 6km be sealed perhaps a more nuanced solution could be found.
You did not address the point that the last part of the track goes along a creek, and for practical and environmental reasons (as well as possible cultural ones) it could not be sealed.
Maybe the access road up to that point could be upgraded, with a parking area there, and those without 4WD could walk in (I estimate about 1.5 km)
The caravaners may also feel more comfortable about leaving their vans in a designated car park off the main road.
Several attractions in the West Macs require a short walk, such as Serpentine Gorge, and Redbank Gorge so it is not without precedent.


Recent Comments by Charlie Carter

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As Mandy Rice-Davies said “well, they would say that, wouldn’t they”.


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A great story Alex, thanks.
There is also some significant creation story associated with it that someone more knowledgeable than I could add.
Your suggestion has merit, and I would be interested in a response from the Aboriginal community.


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Is that the Prof Helen Garnett, former VC of CDU?
If so, as I recall, she is a virologist.
What is her expertise in relation to this project?
She would also be Darwin based.
The mismanagement of the process has the stink of Darwin decisions imposed on Alice as it is.
I have previously written in support of the Melanka site, but with the further information on the vision and scope of the project, I see that the Melanka site is inadequate.
And so is the Anzac High? Hill? Oval? site.
The open space in the landscape near the Desert Park fits the bill, now that we know a bit more.
We need to know it all.


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Yes, I can see the similarities now that I look, and perhaps the fictional dream is combining the two somewhat.
Being originally from NSW I always thought of Sturt as being based there, which he was originally, only basing his third expedition from Adelaide.
And he did suffer from scurvy on his final trip.


What kind of world is this?
“From this first story we move to ‘At Failure Creek’, to the perspective of a “land explorer”, recognisable as Captain Charles Sturt: a man in a “weakened and near blind state”, perhaps close to death himself …

… to the dream of the dying man – of a glorious imagined parade down Rundle Mall”

This is blatantly, obviously, StuArt, not Sturt.


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