@ Charlie Carter, Posted June 13, 2017 at 3:51 pm Exactly, …

Comment on Loop Road heading towards jobs by Erwin Chlanda.

@ Charlie Carter, Posted June 13, 2017 at 3:51 pm
Exactly, Charlie. A camp ground accessible by all vehicles, not just 4WDs, at the entrance to the Gosse Bluff crater would be excellent. A three or four kilometre walk into the crater would be just perfect.
A 12 kilometre return walk just to get to the entrance of the crater, for those who don’t have a 4WD, the ones for whom the Loop was sealed, is insane planning.
Erwin Chlanda, Editor.

Erwin Chlanda Also Commented

Loop Road heading towards jobs
@ Charlie Carter, Posted June 7, 2017 at 9:24 am
Hi Charlie,
The six kilometre access road to the edge of the Gosse Bluff crater is 1.5% of the 400 km Inner Loop. That means 98.5% of the Inner Loop attractions are now assessible by any car, whereas one major attraction, Gosse Bluff, is not because the short access road is designated 4WD.
The crater, one of our major natural wonders, was a specific reason for spending $25.5m of public money to provide a magnificent round-trip, rather than having two out-and-return options.
Most people would consider that an excellent investment decision were it not for the exclusion of most travellers, including intending ones, from Gosse Bluff.
Calculated at the cost of the 43 km section just completed, to seal the Gosse Bluff access would have cost $3.6m, or far less as a 2WD dirt road.
Most would agree that spending this paltry sum would have been worth-while, adding Gosse Bluff to the West Macs attractions accessible by conventional cars.
You appear to be defending a situation were tourists with deeper pockets will get access to this attraction whereas others won’t.
Are you suggesting that Gosse Bluff being a sacred site justifies giving richer people access that is denied to poorer ones?
According to a local quote I got yesterday, a small 2WD hire car costs $384 a week, and a 4WD $1204, more than three times as much.
Are you saying the access road to Palm Valley in such poor condition because it is a sacred site?
The caravaners I spoke with explained they were not prepared to unhook their vans and leave them unattended in what they see as a very remote area.
Of course us locals know that remoteness enhances safety, but we can’t mandate what people believe who’ve travelled thousands of kilometres to enjoy the beauty of our country, and spend their money with us. The customer is always right, as the saying goes.
Erwin Chlanda, Editor, Alice Springs News Online.


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