While Ms van Iersel and CAALAS are lodging a complaint …

Comment on Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS by John Bell.

While Ms van Iersel and CAALAS are lodging a complaint with the Chief Justice about Judge Borchers in a flawed youth justice system, perhaps concerned citizens should consider lodging a complaint with the NT Bar Association about Mr Bhutani, the young lad’s lawyer.
When questioned by Judge Borchers on a plan for the lad’s rehab and welfare if released back into the community, Mr Bhutani had nothing. Zilch. No plan. No nothing, so to speak.
A lawyer just doing the minimum to win the case. On the public purse. After the win in the court hearing they part ways – the young lad goes back on the street and the lawyer goes back to his office. To get his next brief.
Hardly inspires confidence in our legal eagles of the common people, hey.
If CAALAS wants a judge hauled over the coals in this case it seems to me there is evidence to haul the CAALAS lawyer over the coals, too.

John Bell Also Commented

Judge Borchers’ position should be assessed: CAALAS
Now that Judge Borchers has placed the lad in a controlled environment for proper assessment and the dust begins to settle, some questions need to be asked:
1. Who is to conduct the assesment process?
2. What will the assessment process actually encompass ie what will be the terms of reference ?
3. Will the results be made public and in what public forum?
4. Will the Attorney-General make publicly transparent the processing of the CAALAS complaint against Judge Borchers?
5. Will the Chief Justice remove Judge Borchers from cases dealing with youngsters on the rampage?
6. Will CAALAS employ someone full-time in future to care for for troubled and lawbreaking teens?
7. Will CAALAS be asked to explain why no plan was put to the court to make sure this lad did not re-offend?
Doubtless there are others.
It is only complete transparency in the process of obtaining the answers to such questions in this case that will ensure the public trust can be maintained in the integrity of our youth justice system.


Recent Comments by John Bell

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Then in 2003 I visited Japan and stumbled across a small maritime museum on the coast 80 km north of Tokyo. I was astounded to see a huge 12th century map outline of the eastern Australian coastline from the tip of Cape Yorke down to approximately the border of present day Victoria.
The young with-it Japanese curator told me that local fishing boats went fishing all the way down the Australian coast for centuries before the emperors banned overseas sailing after the Divine Wind attempted invasion by the Chinese.
Suspended from the three storey ceiling was a replica of one of those original fishing boats. Tiny. My mind boggled.
It would be terrific education for an Australian maritime museum to display such boats from different peoples and countries during these eras.
It would give us a greater appreciation of the comparative maritime brilliance of the different cultures.


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The jury remains out. I suspect it will remain out for a long time to come the way things are going in these #MeToo times where the forces identity politics are lining up on all sides, Left and Right.


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Three wonderful ambassadors who have enriched and continue to grow Alice’s proud sporting heritage.


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