We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but …

Comment on Change on new council: three women, three greens by Evelyne Roullet.

We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but I find interesting that there is no mention of the problem caused by disposable nappies in our landfill. I do not want to offend but I know that new parents being greenies ecologists or other use disposable nappies and keep their children in them much longer than if they were using washable ones.
According to figures released in 2009 by IbisWorld, Australians use around 5.6 million nappies per day. This means that over 2 billion used nappies go into landfill sites in Australia each year. Will this new council go to war on nappies?

Key Environmental Issues:
Despite their modern popularity, the ease of disposable nappies and the sheer volume that we use each year poses significant environmental problems. Manufacturing Impact: Disposable nappies require large volumes of pulp, paper, plastic and other raw materials in the manufacturing process and hence, significant amounts of water and energy are used. This contributes to energy waste and pollution on a large scale and also links to other problems associated with deforestation and non-sustainable sourcing.
Nappy Fact: According to The Good Human, disposable nappies use 3 times more energy, 20 times more raw materials and 2 times more water than reusables during the manufacturing process.
Landfill Problems: Disposable nappies also place a huge strain on landfill sites in Australia. When combined with other absorbent hygiene materials (such as sanitary pads and incontinence pads), this results in around 450,000 tonnes of landfill waste every year and also contributes to notable amounts of carbon emissions.
Decomposition Problems: Many disposable nappies are also not as biodegradable as we assume. Scientists estimate that once nappies end up in a landfill, they can take around 500 years to decompose.
Contamination Issues: When we defecate, our waste goes into the toilet for good reason: It is treated and sanitised before being recycled or put back into our environment. The waste in disposable nappies, on the other hand, goes straight into the bin. As a result, when the nappies are placed into landfill, certain bacteria and viruses are at risk of soaking in to our groundwater and causing subsequent contamination problems
Nappy Fact: If you threw out a disposable nappy anytime this year, it wouldn’t fully decompose until the year 2514.
Read more at: www.australianscience.com.au/environmental-science/disposable-nappies-are-they-stinking-up-our-planet/

Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

Council to introduce kerbside recycling
Excellent, but why do we have to be charged for it? What if we do not want it? Quote: “Diverting recyclables from the waste stream will extend the lifespan of our landfill site, saving Council and the community costs in the long term.”
Are we paying for our own savings? Who is really the beneficiary of the scheme?


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Dr Lovell said that early this year more than 20 artists, writers, and educators from different cultural backgrounds were invited to respond artistically to the 4m high statue, which has been situated in a public park in Alice Springs for the past four years.
May I ask if those artists looked at the statue with the 21st century eye or from one of 1870s era?
The gun? Not so long ago any one working in the outback carried one in his/her vehicle.
@ Fred the Philistine: What environmentalists have to do with the statue? I am what you call a “tree huger” and I like Stuart’s statue.


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Peter, Darren is correct, there will be more jobs and work for people in health care, in counselling and for the undertakers.


Council not keen on offer of help to fight crime
I for one will say, bring the parents to shame and make them face reality in accord with their culture. Traditional Aboriginal cultural values ensure that Aboriginal children are provided with the freedom to explore the world and to learn their responsibilities to care for and protect one other.
While the children are encouraged to explore the world around them, issues of safety are always considered:
They are encouraged to explore, within a safe distance, with safe practices put into place. There are shared values of the local community and other family members to allow the children to learn from their own experiences.
If a child is exposed to any kind of risk, families trust that it will be reported back to them: If someone has abandoned their caring responsibilities, for whatever reason, someone from the local community will inevitably raise the issue.
Roaming the streets and the hills are unsafe, far away from home, and the older teens do not care for the little ones.
So in my humble opinion we should give parental / communities the right to judge and to act.
Give the traditional owners a go, as maybe before meetings, activities etc.
We acknowledge them? In fact we do not, and it is only when we show them some real respect that their children will respect us.


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Where will the patrols be? In town? CBD? The hills? The gangs will then shift to other suburbs very quickly and the patrols will not be able to be everywhere. Make the parents responsible!


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