We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but …

Comment on Change on new council: three women, three greens by Evelyne Roullet.

We talk of green, environmentalists, recycling, solar energy etc… but I find interesting that there is no mention of the problem caused by disposable nappies in our landfill. I do not want to offend but I know that new parents being greenies ecologists or other use disposable nappies and keep their children in them much longer than if they were using washable ones.
According to figures released in 2009 by IbisWorld, Australians use around 5.6 million nappies per day. This means that over 2 billion used nappies go into landfill sites in Australia each year. Will this new council go to war on nappies?

Key Environmental Issues:
Despite their modern popularity, the ease of disposable nappies and the sheer volume that we use each year poses significant environmental problems. Manufacturing Impact: Disposable nappies require large volumes of pulp, paper, plastic and other raw materials in the manufacturing process and hence, significant amounts of water and energy are used. This contributes to energy waste and pollution on a large scale and also links to other problems associated with deforestation and non-sustainable sourcing.
Nappy Fact: According to The Good Human, disposable nappies use 3 times more energy, 20 times more raw materials and 2 times more water than reusables during the manufacturing process.
Landfill Problems: Disposable nappies also place a huge strain on landfill sites in Australia. When combined with other absorbent hygiene materials (such as sanitary pads and incontinence pads), this results in around 450,000 tonnes of landfill waste every year and also contributes to notable amounts of carbon emissions.
Decomposition Problems: Many disposable nappies are also not as biodegradable as we assume. Scientists estimate that once nappies end up in a landfill, they can take around 500 years to decompose.
Contamination Issues: When we defecate, our waste goes into the toilet for good reason: It is treated and sanitised before being recycled or put back into our environment. The waste in disposable nappies, on the other hand, goes straight into the bin. As a result, when the nappies are placed into landfill, certain bacteria and viruses are at risk of soaking in to our groundwater and causing subsequent contamination problems
Nappy Fact: If you threw out a disposable nappy anytime this year, it wouldn’t fully decompose until the year 2514.
Read more at: www.australianscience.com.au/environmental-science/disposable-nappies-are-they-stinking-up-our-planet/

Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

The stolen child who went to university
@ David, Posted February 11, 2019 at 11:00 pm: “We need to get some things straight here.
If policemen, holy men of the cloth, miners, pastoralist, vagabonds of the day, had kept their trousers buttoned up and not pursued Aboriginal women, there would not be a stolen generation, that is, children sired by non Aboriginal men as those described.”
Your comment underlines the fact that those children were part of two communities: Aboriginal and European.
I am in total agreement with you, it was a disgrace that those children were stolen from their mother; but in this period of history women of any skin colour did not have many rights.


Make September 8 Australia Day, anthem in Pitjantjatjara
Great ideas, Ted.


Planning another plan
I am in total agreement with Puesdo Guru.


Australia Day: Alice’s role in it
@ Alex: I think that unless we sit with all our different sources, we will never agree on this point, as even our government states that Cook claimed Australia.


Australia Day: Alice’s role in it
@ Local 1: you wrote :”Australia’s history really began when first claimed by Philip on the shores of Port Jackson, on January 26, 1788″.
I am a bit confused as I always believe, that is perhaps because of my French history, that Britain Lieutenant James Cook, captain of HMB Endeavour, claimed the eastern portion of the Australian continent for the British Crown in 1770, naming it New South Wales seeking to pre-empt the French colonial empire from expanding into the region.
Louis Antoine de Bougainville 1768 approached the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of North Queensland but was turned away by the surf.
You have to be thankful to the surf because without it you will be French and the 14th of July not the 9th would be our national day.
Britain chose Australia as the site of a penal colony.
But until Queen Victoria gave us our freedom, we were not a nation but a colony.
In my opinion, it is very strange and sad that we celebrate the landing of criminals and prostitutes as our beginning.
Many convicts were left struggling with unemployment, personal relationships, and alcoholism, and drifted through both life and the colony.
Many re-offended for decades after they were freed in Australia, but only committed low-level nuisance and public order offenses – mainly drunkenness and vagrancy – rather than the more serious crimes for which they were initially transported.


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