@ R Henry (Posted September 18, 2017 at 3:12 pm) …

Comment on Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital by Alex Nelson.

@ R Henry (Posted September 18, 2017 at 3:12 pm) – A quick check of the Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia website reveals the following: “Most homes built before the mid 1970s contain asbestos in some form, and in fact asbestos building products continued to be used up until the early 1980s.
“Asbestos was easy to work with, was affordable and had the added quality of being heat resistant.”
The fact is that the use of asbestos in construction was commonplace in the 1960s and 1970s so it should come as no surprise that it occurs in major construction projects of that time.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
@ R Henry (Posted September 25, 2017 at 9:28 am): You make a fair point but it’s interesting to compare your observations about asbestos with the history of tobacco advertising in Australia.
The National Archives of Australia provides the following: “The connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer was already evident by the 1920s. It was, however, in the middle decades of the twentieth century that evidence of the links became more widely known and accepted.
“The influential British Medical Journal published results of a study in 1950, and in 1956 the first report of the British Doctors Study, a study of some 34,000 doctors, linked smoking to both lung cancer and coronary thrombosis. The United States (US) Surgeon-General announced in 1964 that smoking caused lung cancer. In 1965 cigarette advertising on United Kingdom (UK) television was banned, and health warning labels became compulsory on US cigarette packets.”
With regards to electronic media, Australia was a full decade behind. The Whitlam Government decided to ban tobacco advertising on radio and TV but the legislation was finally passed by the Fraser Government, coming into effect on September 1, 1976.
Tobacco advertising in print media didn’t cease until July 1, 1993.
When it comes to implementing and enforcing public health policies in light of clear scientific evidence, Australia tends to be the laggard; however, once the policies become official, our country rapidly makes up for lost time.
We are witnessing the same pattern in play for alcohol abuse and atmospheric carbon emissions, both of which have enormous influences on public health.


Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
In 1968 the design of the planned new Alice Springs hospital was for a four-storey building with a helipad on the roof. A year or so later this design fell out of favour for the current complex subsequently built in the 1970s.
In the early 1980s the Member for Sadadeen, Denis Collins, revived the idea of a helipad to be located at the Alice Springs hospital.
Perhaps ironically, the suggestion is now being made by Robyn Lambley to build a new hospital on crown land (the old Butchers’ Paddock) near the Alice Springs Airport.
However, I contend the best solution is to seriously and genuinely work towards reducing the morbidity of the local population.
We’ve forgotten the existing hospital complex was designed and built at a time when the population of Alice Springs was anticipated to grow to 50,000 residents by the turn of the century.
We’ve never come close to this, even on a regional basis, and yet the hospital has often been stretched to its limits over the years.
Moreover, the whole complex has been undergoing almost continuous upgrading at massive cost to the taxpayer for the last two decades yet invariably it proves to be insufficient to keep up with the apparent demand for health services.


Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
In 1968 the design of the planned new Alice Springs Hospital was for a four-storey building with a helipad on the roof. A year or so later this design fell out of favour for the current complex subsequently built in the 1970s.
In the early 1980s the Member for Sadadeen, Denis Collins, revived the idea of a helipad to be located at the Alice Springs Hospital.
Perhaps ironically, the suggestion is now being made by Robyn Lambley to build a new hospital on crown land (the old Butchers’ Paddock) near the Alice Springs Airport.
However, I contend the best solution is to seriously and genuinely work towards reducing the morbidity of the local population.
We’ve forgotten the existing hospital complex was designed and built at a time when the population of Alice Springs was anticipated to grow to 50,000 residents by the turn of the century.
We’ve never come close to this, even on a regional basis, and yet the hospital has often been stretched to its limits over the years.
Moreover, the whole complex has been undergoing almost continuous upgrading at massive cost to the taxpayer for the last two decades yet invariably it proves to be insufficient to keep up with the apparent demand for health services.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

NT tourism turbocharger out of gas as Feds eye off Kakadu
A cash splash of $216m versus $220m for Kakadu/Jabiru as the race commences for this year’s Federal election campaign.
Hmm, is it Tweedledum and Tweedledee, or Heckle and Jeckle? Cartoonists could have fun with this double act.


Traditional owners unite to dump Anzac as gallery site
It’s worth keeping in mind that the council-owned lease for Anzac Oval extends over the car park area in front of the school.
The NT Governent-owned lease starts from the front of the main school building and extends through the rear of the campus, so it’s not as big an area as many probably assume.


National Indigenous Art Gallery future in doubt: Gunner
This utter debacle should mean that several heads will roll, from the Chief Minister down.
If this happened anywhere else in Australia, that is what would happen.
An absolutely disgraceful performance, and I predict it will get worse before this matter is terminated.


The financial crisis in the Northern Territory
While we navel-gaze at our own dire financial situation in the NT, a report just posted on the ABC News site states: “Since its recent peak in late-August, the local market has plummeted by about 12% — as investors grow increasingly concerned about an unresolved trade war, slowing global economic growth and the United States raising interest rates too quickly.
“Sentiment is as bad as I’ve seen it for a long, long time … the negativity is absolutely rife,” Chris Weston, head of research at Pepperstone, said.
“Ultimately, the market is concerned if we do see a resolution between those two nations [the US and China] … the damage has actually been done to the global economy and we’re hurtling towards a recession.
“Equities is a confidence game, and if it goes down in China, Japan, Europe and the US, we are going down as well — there’s no doubt about that situation.”
That “we are going down as well” is us – Australia as a whole.
If recession is now on the cards, I think we can forget about assistance for the NT. The money is just not going to be there.
In my article “The forgotten lesson” I stated near the conclusion “currently both national and world circumstances appear decidedly tentative at best. We’re likely to find ourselves overtaken by events well outside of our control.”
At present it appears those events are now starting to overtake us.


Alice has hottest day on record
@ Fiona Walsh (Posted January 2, 2019 at 3:12 pm): Thank you, Fiona, for your most informative post.
The closure of the CSIRO in Alice Springs is, I consider, one of the most short-sighted and regrettable decisions ever made as far as Central Australia is concerned but typical of the myopia that afflicts contemporary coast-oriented bureaucracy.
Maintaining the presence of the CSIRO in the Centre would surely have been as vital in these times of worsening climatic conditions and consequent impacts on the environment as it ever has been in the past.
However, the loss of the CSIRO in Alice Springs is symptomatic, and certainly symbolic, of the lack of concern and real regard for so much of the real Australia.


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