@ R Henry (Posted September 25, 2017 at 9:28 am): …

Comment on Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital by Alex Nelson.

@ R Henry (Posted September 25, 2017 at 9:28 am): You make a fair point but it’s interesting to compare your observations about asbestos with the history of tobacco advertising in Australia.
The National Archives of Australia provides the following: “The connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer was already evident by the 1920s. It was, however, in the middle decades of the twentieth century that evidence of the links became more widely known and accepted.
“The influential British Medical Journal published results of a study in 1950, and in 1956 the first report of the British Doctors Study, a study of some 34,000 doctors, linked smoking to both lung cancer and coronary thrombosis. The United States (US) Surgeon-General announced in 1964 that smoking caused lung cancer. In 1965 cigarette advertising on United Kingdom (UK) television was banned, and health warning labels became compulsory on US cigarette packets.”
With regards to electronic media, Australia was a full decade behind. The Whitlam Government decided to ban tobacco advertising on radio and TV but the legislation was finally passed by the Fraser Government, coming into effect on September 1, 1976.
Tobacco advertising in print media didn’t cease until July 1, 1993.
When it comes to implementing and enforcing public health policies in light of clear scientific evidence, Australia tends to be the laggard; however, once the policies become official, our country rapidly makes up for lost time.
We are witnessing the same pattern in play for alcohol abuse and atmospheric carbon emissions, both of which have enormous influences on public health.

Alex Nelson Also Commented

Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
In 1968 the design of the planned new Alice Springs hospital was for a four-storey building with a helipad on the roof. A year or so later this design fell out of favour for the current complex subsequently built in the 1970s.
In the early 1980s the Member for Sadadeen, Denis Collins, revived the idea of a helipad to be located at the Alice Springs hospital.
Perhaps ironically, the suggestion is now being made by Robyn Lambley to build a new hospital on crown land (the old Butchers’ Paddock) near the Alice Springs Airport.
However, I contend the best solution is to seriously and genuinely work towards reducing the morbidity of the local population.
We’ve forgotten the existing hospital complex was designed and built at a time when the population of Alice Springs was anticipated to grow to 50,000 residents by the turn of the century.
We’ve never come close to this, even on a regional basis, and yet the hospital has often been stretched to its limits over the years.
Moreover, the whole complex has been undergoing almost continuous upgrading at massive cost to the taxpayer for the last two decades yet invariably it proves to be insufficient to keep up with the apparent demand for health services.


Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
In 1968 the design of the planned new Alice Springs Hospital was for a four-storey building with a helipad on the roof. A year or so later this design fell out of favour for the current complex subsequently built in the 1970s.
In the early 1980s the Member for Sadadeen, Denis Collins, revived the idea of a helipad to be located at the Alice Springs Hospital.
Perhaps ironically, the suggestion is now being made by Robyn Lambley to build a new hospital on crown land (the old Butchers’ Paddock) near the Alice Springs Airport.
However, I contend the best solution is to seriously and genuinely work towards reducing the morbidity of the local population.
We’ve forgotten the existing hospital complex was designed and built at a time when the population of Alice Springs was anticipated to grow to 50,000 residents by the turn of the century.
We’ve never come close to this, even on a regional basis, and yet the hospital has often been stretched to its limits over the years.
Moreover, the whole complex has been undergoing almost continuous upgrading at massive cost to the taxpayer for the last two decades yet invariably it proves to be insufficient to keep up with the apparent demand for health services.


Lambley: Asbestos just one problem in hospital
@ R Henry (Posted September 18, 2017 at 3:12 pm) – A quick check of the Asbestos Diseases Society of Australia website reveals the following: “Most homes built before the mid 1970s contain asbestos in some form, and in fact asbestos building products continued to be used up until the early 1980s.
“Asbestos was easy to work with, was affordable and had the added quality of being heat resistant.”
The fact is that the use of asbestos in construction was commonplace in the 1960s and 1970s so it should come as no surprise that it occurs in major construction projects of that time.


Recent Comments by Alex Nelson

Centre of attention: Glory days of Anzac Oval in the 1950s
@ Peter Bassett (Posted February 19, 2019 at 7:33 pm): Appreciate your comment, especially about the old high school, Peter.
Contrary to what has been reported in the some media, the old school building is a very well constructed building with enormous inherent heritage value.
There has been – and is – a deliberately false and misleading campaign initiated by the NT Government, amplified by vested interests through a complicit and compliant print media, to denigrate the worth and value of that old education complex.


From mud, dust to grass: The beginning of Anzac Oval
@ Dr Ongo (Posted February 14, 2019 at 8:08 pm): You raise an interesting point; however, your observation applies equally well to other listed heritage sites, eg. such places as the Alice Springs Telegraph Station, Alice Springs Heritage Precinct (including Stuart Park, old hospital, old Alice Springs Gaol, and several houses in Hartley and Bath streets), and the Hermannsburg Historic Precinct.
There are histories, stories or law applicable to all of these places since time immemorial but other than to acknowledge previous Aboriginal occupation or use of such sites, I’m not qualified or knowledgeable enough to comment about them.
In regard to “untyeye that once grew there” at the Anzac Oval site (referring to corkwood trees – Hakea divaricata), only one still survives just inside the boundary near the Senior Citizens Club. It’s the same tree on the right of the photo, framing the new school, taken by Prue Crouch’s father in the early 1950s.
The heritage statement for the nomination of Anzac Oval does state: “The Anzac Oval Precinct contains several sacred sites.”
Thanks for your comment.

 

Corkwood


Home owner bonus: New build sector bleak, says CLP
The situation generally in the Northern Territory is giving every indication that it’s rapidly spiralling out of control.
I suspect the NT Government’s reactions are too little, too late; and this latest scheme will likely end up being home owner bogus rather than bonus.


West Macs fire mitigation critically inadequate: Scientist
Such a shame, Steve, that we’re unable to harness your sprays to put the wildfires out.


Government fails to protect major tourism asset
My recollection is that the major wildfire years in the earliest period of this century were 2002-03, and again in 2011. Both of those periods closely followed years of exceptionally high rainfall (2000-01 and 2010 respectively).
This isn’t unusual in itself – there were significant wildfire years in 1968 (following the breaking of the drought in 1966) and in 1975 (following 1973-4, the wettest period on record in Alice Springs).
What’s different now is that this major wildfire event has occurred after a very dry year, with a record set at Alice Springs in 2018 for the longest period without rain being recorded, although (as I recall) this wasn’t the case further west of town.
In the last few years, I’ve had the opportunity to travel west and east of Alice Springs a number of times and also to fly frequently to Darwin and back with clear views of the area around town.
The clear impression I’ve gained on every trip is the extent and dominance of the spread of buffel grass in the ranges.
It’s like a blanket hugging the ground as far as the eye can see. It’s spread is overwhelming, and the ecology of this region is forever changed.
There are often comments about the need for protecting Alice Springs from major floods but that’s the least of our worries.
It is major wildfire that poses the most serious risk to our town, and the recent disaster in the West Macs demonstrates this risk can occur at any time.


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