Father Raass. I have never met you. However, as a …

Comment on You can vote No with love: Alice priest by John Bell.

Father Raass. I have never met you. However, as a Christian and a former Sacred Heart Alician parishioner, I will put my hand up as a No voter to say that you have nailed the essence of our side of the debate.
The word “love” is a great word in the English language.
Unfortunately, it can be ambushed to mean whatever anyone wants it to mean, to quote a famous character of old.
Whatever camp one is in, no matter what opinion one has about marriage, the word “love” will always remain a constant.
In coming out as a straight to say this publicly, I extend my love to my gay friends in Alice.
Nothing for me will change in the way I have always loved and respected you no matter what your views on marriage may be. I hope my fellow No voters will also come out and express the same view.

John Bell Also Commented

You can vote No with love: Alice priest
@ Number 19: You say that all discrimination is morally wrong. However, fair and reasonable discrimination is everywhere around us.
I do not know what your gender is, but I think we would all agree with the discrimination that does not permit a male to enter female toilet.
The word “discrimination” has been captured by the PC brigade at the Human Rights Commission and enshrined in the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 as part of the secular new age moral gospel on right and wrong.
The Human Rights zealots have re-shaped the word to mean whatever they want it to mean. For example, they authorise discrimination in favour of certain groups in our society as morally good in Section 9 and Section 10 of the Act.
In those Sections of the Act have re-badged the word “discrimination””and now call it “Special Measures”.
It is an in-house term, used by their lawyers in courts and tribunals when accusing respondents of discrimination against their clients under the Act.
They hace also referred to S.9 and S.10 to excuse their own clients’ discriminatory actions.
In other parts of the Act they give exemptions as they see fit for discriminatory behaviour. In other words, they claim that discrimination is only bad when applied by certain individuals or groups against other individuals or groups in our society in certain circumstances.
The word “discrimination” has been effectively and morally re-shaped in their own image by this secular authority.
At first glance, this is a bit Big Brother authoritarian and hypocritical, don’t you think?
So: Is it OK for secular discrimination by the Pitt Street mob but not by Christian faiths?


You can vote No with love: Alice priest
Miss Roullet has drawn timely attention to the reluctance of NO voters to openly air their views for fear of attack.
So far, five of the six comments have been YES voters firing shots at NO voter religion and race. Fair enough. To be expected.
However, this is further anecdotal evidence to explain why it is understandable that atheist and agnostic NO voters are keeping views to themselves and the survey envelope.
They are staying down in their foxholes because if they stick their heads up above the trench and who knows what part of their individual character or anatomy will be blitzkrieged by some of the more militant YES army!


Recent Comments by John Bell

How much of our relationship with Aborigines is hypocrisy?
Jakub Baranski. Thank you for your view on Aboriginal dugout canoes. It is historically interesting.
I have had an interest since my youth in Matthew Flinders’ amazing circumnavigation of Australia in a tiny boat.
Then in 2003 I visited Japan and stumbled across a small maritime museum on the coast 80 km north of Tokyo. I was astounded to see a huge 12th century map outline of the eastern Australian coastline from the tip of Cape Yorke down to approximately the border of present day Victoria.
The young with-it Japanese curator told me that local fishing boats went fishing all the way down the Australian coast for centuries before the emperors banned overseas sailing after the Divine Wind attempted invasion by the Chinese.
Suspended from the three storey ceiling was a replica of one of those original fishing boats. Tiny. My mind boggled.
It would be terrific education for an Australian maritime museum to display such boats from different peoples and countries during these eras.
It would give us a greater appreciation of the comparative maritime brilliance of the different cultures.


Leaving town: Centre, its creatures will miss Kaye Kessing
Kaye. A very kind and gentle lady whom I am very proud to call a friend since early 70s Melanka days.
The mural on the Coles wall from the Ghan window is my lasting memory of a brilliant talent.
The friend of the endangered species. Alice has been greatly enriched by a good lady.


If you can climb Mt Everest and in Yosemite, why not Uluru?
I have never been able to work out exactly why The Rock should not be climbed.
Is it a spiritual religious thing? Or is it simply because the custodians think it is a “respect” thing?
If the latter, is it because the custodians feel offended or is Uluru considered a living entity that feels offended?
I am fair dinkum when I ask this. Different people have different views. It is confusing.


Kids behind razor wire, rural land misuse, gallery fiasco & more
The emotive language of “razor wire” and “Alcatraz” and the dispute over location of youth detention centre is symptomatic of the “sharply”-divided public debate over how to stop young people from committing crimes against society.
How do we punish young people appropriately for causing hurt and damage and stress to their fellow citizens and at the same time deter them from from further offending and teach them to be good citizens?
The jury remains out. I suspect it will remain out for a long time to come the way things are going in these #MeToo times where the forces identity politics are lining up on all sides, Left and Right.


Alice in thrall of week-long sports extravaganza
@ Bob Taylor: Thank you for that, mate. You mention three great Alician names in sport – past, present and future: Rhonda, Dick and Emma.
Three wonderful ambassadors who have enriched and continue to grow Alice’s proud sporting heritage.


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