People value their personal freedom and don’t like someone telling …

Comment on You can vote No with love: Alice priest by Michael.

People value their personal freedom and don’t like someone telling them how to vote, but voting No reduces others’ personal freedom.
Our society needs more ways to bring people together, and marriage is a wonderful institution for that purpose.

Michael Also Commented

You can vote No with love: Alice priest
Laws are created to regulate what people are already doing.
Thousands of same-sex couples already exist.
Marriage simply gives those couples the security of having a single document that confirms the legal status of their existing relationship, in any state or country.
Thus, marriage is about people being equal before the law.
Equality is a fundamental concept in our legal system, and a basic tenet of international human rights.
We should not have a plebiscite to confirm a human right! It only serves to expose the bigotry of some people and religions.
In our world today, we need to learn more ways to work together!


You can vote No with love: Alice priest
I am sad that you believe celibate priests like you are not “ideal building blocks of society” just because you do not choose a wife and children.
That is not true in this town! An ideal building block of Alice Springs society is acceptance of sexual differences – including yours.
We would never discriminate against you just because you do not procreate!
Alice Springs supports your choice to make a lifelong commitment to love through celibacy. In turn, you should support other people’s desires make their own lifelong commitment to love through marriage.
We need as many ways as possible for people to make lifelong commitments to love, because it brings people together and builds a stronger Alice Springs.
It is the will of our loving God for us all to vote YES.


Recent Comments by Michael

Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price
John, thanks for clarifying, and for raising a key question relevant to Council diversity.
You say: “I think most of us have found that human nature has common traits and behavioural patterns in all groups, whether male or female, regardless of gender, colour, age or political leanings.”
Recent research (e.g. Everett 2016 Dark Matter of the Mind) has found that such innate “human nature” does not exist. Our only nature is the freedom to adapt to our environmental and our cultural contexts.
Alice Springs has so many different contexts, that more diverse “traits and behaviour patterns” on the Council may be our town’s best survival strategy!


Surprising conservative on council: Jacinta Price
I am quite impressed how John Bell’s patronising judgements so effectively validated Kieran’s comment. Blind, indeed! I hope Jacinta can see more clearly.


Flood report a trickle, not a banker
Let’s not rush off for “action on this report” and re-engineer a river system that no one fully understands.
Before the Flood Mitigation Advisory Committee Draft Report was published, neither mayoral candidate Jimmy nor Damien hosted a meeting with the groups they represent (ALEC members or Alice Springs residents) to obtain our informed consent about a decision that will affect everyone.
Thus any further planning needs a more democratic and inclusive decision-making process.
I wrote on 7 January 2017 an Alice Springs News essay warning of the consequences for regulating the Todd River.
Several long-time residents commented with practical strategies that were not considered in the Final Report.
For example, Charlie Carter suggested municipal self-insurance as a replacement for TIO; David Devries suggested more rainfall be captured where it falls; and Fiona Walsh reminded us of a 1994 geomorphological study by Russell Grant that can inform the risk of constructing multiple headwater dams (aka “detention basins in the upper catchments” in Recommendation 2.1.)
The comments on this week’s article show that other residents also have much to contribute.
I suggest that any decision to change a river system that is older than humanity needs our full consideration of any long-term impacts – including the option that we people are the ones who need to change.
The most effective recommendation can be our willingness to adapt to our environment.


Indigenous art gallery, cultural centre: combined or separate?
Long ago, I remember Harold sharing his inspiring vision of the Desert Knowledge Precinct and Desert People’s Centre.
The ending of that story makes me quite cautious about another plan to combine organisations to form a bigger bureaucracy.
There are many examples of smaller being better!


Desert ‘mysteries’: start by asking the locals 
The Computer vs. The Crowbar continues.
A few months ago a group of computer modellers published an analysis in Nature (541: 398–401) that fully supports what the Aboriginal people and Fiona observed, AND also supports part of the “fairy circle” hypothesis.
Competition between territorial termites (subterranean borders) create the regularity of these large-scale hexagonal patterns AND the plants between the termites also organise into circular patterns that help each other resist and recover from drought.
Both groups have their own strategy that helps sustain their ecosystem.
However, this model was done using only the data from “termite circles” in Namibia, not yet from those in Australia. So we must wait for Round 4.


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