@ Number 19: You say that all discrimination is morally …

Comment on You can vote No with love: Alice priest by John Bell.

@ Number 19: You say that all discrimination is morally wrong. However, fair and reasonable discrimination is everywhere around us.
I do not know what your gender is, but I think we would all agree with the discrimination that does not permit a male to enter female toilet.
The word “discrimination” has been captured by the PC brigade at the Human Rights Commission and enshrined in the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 as part of the secular new age moral gospel on right and wrong.
The Human Rights zealots have re-shaped the word to mean whatever they want it to mean. For example, they authorise discrimination in favour of certain groups in our society as morally good in Section 9 and Section 10 of the Act.
In those Sections of the Act have re-badged the word “discrimination””and now call it “Special Measures”.
It is an in-house term, used by their lawyers in courts and tribunals when accusing respondents of discrimination against their clients under the Act.
They hace also referred to S.9 and S.10 to excuse their own clients’ discriminatory actions.
In other parts of the Act they give exemptions as they see fit for discriminatory behaviour. In other words, they claim that discrimination is only bad when applied by certain individuals or groups against other individuals or groups in our society in certain circumstances.
The word “discrimination” has been effectively and morally re-shaped in their own image by this secular authority.
At first glance, this is a bit Big Brother authoritarian and hypocritical, don’t you think?
So: Is it OK for secular discrimination by the Pitt Street mob but not by Christian faiths?

John Bell Also Commented

You can vote No with love: Alice priest
Miss Roullet has drawn timely attention to the reluctance of NO voters to openly air their views for fear of attack.
So far, five of the six comments have been YES voters firing shots at NO voter religion and race. Fair enough. To be expected.
However, this is further anecdotal evidence to explain why it is understandable that atheist and agnostic NO voters are keeping views to themselves and the survey envelope.
They are staying down in their foxholes because if they stick their heads up above the trench and who knows what part of their individual character or anatomy will be blitzkrieged by some of the more militant YES army!


You can vote No with love: Alice priest
Father Raass. I have never met you. However, as a Christian and a former Sacred Heart Alician parishioner, I will put my hand up as a No voter to say that you have nailed the essence of our side of the debate.
The word “love” is a great word in the English language.
Unfortunately, it can be ambushed to mean whatever anyone wants it to mean, to quote a famous character of old.
Whatever camp one is in, no matter what opinion one has about marriage, the word “love” will always remain a constant.
In coming out as a straight to say this publicly, I extend my love to my gay friends in Alice.
Nothing for me will change in the way I have always loved and respected you no matter what your views on marriage may be. I hope my fellow No voters will also come out and express the same view.


Recent Comments by John Bell

Alice in thrall of week-long sports extravaganza
@ Bob Taylor: Thank you for that, mate. You mention three great Alician names in sport – past, present and future: Rhonda, Dick and Emma.
Three wonderful ambassadors who have enriched and continue to grow Alice’s proud sporting heritage.


Alice in thrall of week-long sports extravaganza
The Masters Games has been a great initiative over the years. Many good people have been associated with its organisation and all are to be congratulated.
Above all else the games place a positive focus on togetherness and inspiration in the community as we grow older.
For inspiration, it does not come much more magnificent than the wonderful effort by Dicky Kimber in the 100m track event in the 2018 Games on the weekend.
The lad is a living example of loving life and all it has to offer. Every step of that 100m was gold. Wish I could have been there to see it.


Ice Age in Alice
@ Eugene’s Mate: I am surprised that ice as you say does not have a foothold in remote communities out of Alice.
It is so cheap, so readily available and is an epidemic in the lower socio-economic strata of the general urban community, in all ethnic sections, including Aboriginal, in Melbourne.
It is almost off the scale and out of control.


Ice Age in Alice
@ Russell Guy. Sorry mate. While I really do respect your view on this subject – and we have all seen this growing problem first hand for many years everywhere – I think the police request for light beer at the Masters Games was laughable.
It was like removing a very small, well behaved fitness-conscious pimple once every two years on a very large 24/7/36 public pumpkin of out-of-control drug and alcohol addiction in the Alice (as down here in Melbourne Town).
Common sense should have told the cops that this Masters Games judgment call simply got it wrong.


Tony Abbott sent packing on his first Aboriginal envoy trip
It has bothered me for a long time that individuals in remote Aboriginal communities so often claim to speak for the whole community in Australian politics without any questioning of other members of the community for their individual political views.
I began to see the politicisation of remote isolated communities in the NT first hand during my work in the Alice and then in Darwin in the late 60s and 70s.
One major party in particular captured the political mindset of so  many communities with hard sell, patronising welfare policies with a sit-down money focus that I thought it made so many good people in these communities vulnerable and captive to the group think mentality of a particular major party view.
I believe it created a  political herd mentality perception of Aboriginal people that demeaned them in the wider white community. 
It suggested that individual Aboriginal people in remote communities were incapable of forming independent individual views in Australian politics.
This did not promote healthy political debate in those communities and made Aboriginal people with different views fearful of speaking out. 
Only in fairly recent times have Aboriginal individuals started to challenge and break that mindset.
So, when reading media political releases such as this one on Borroloola, my first thought is to ask – who wrote the report? What is his or her political affiliation? And have all residents in that community expressed their individual views in the compiling of the release?
Until the person(s) who write such media reports come clean with honest, transparent and factual answers to those questions, the ugly herd mentality captive image of remote communities will remain entrenched in the Aussie political landscape for the vast majority of white urban dwellers in the Big Smoke.
And the diverse political views of Aboriginal people will continue to be devalued.


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