@ Fred the Philistine: “Alice is a very dirty town.” …

Comment on Local government: A lot of action beyond the 3Rs by John Bell.

@ Fred the Philistine: “Alice is a very dirty town.” Easily solved, on the face of it. The obvious solution is to make council cleaning services a major priority. Hire more street sweeping machines, sanitation workers, public toilet attendants, commit major budget funds. Go the whole nine yards.
But the wider issue that stares everyone in the face, and was apparent to me as a city kid when I stepped off the Fokker at Alice Airport in 1967, is the public health and hygiene issue arising from the cultural divide in the traditional Aboriginal community.
A tricky situation. A tricky sensitive situation to which there seems no ready made solution.

John Bell Also Commented

Local government: A lot of action beyond the 3Rs
“What role does the Council play?” is a vital question that needs to be addressed urgently by the Australian community in the most over-governed nation per head of population on planet earth.
With councillors around Australua zipping off on “professional development” trips to China hand in hand with State politicians, councils have become platforms to launch political careers and to pursue social engineering agendas way beyond the letter and spirit of council charter.
Our daily lives are being micro managed by
Looney Tune councils down here in Mexico a la Darebin, Moreland and Yarra, preaching social engineering philosophies that are moralistic, intrusive and extreme nanny state.
I hope the good people on the Alice Council resist the the heady drug of self-appointed greatness and power beyond their charter and stay true to the ideals of first class delivery of roads rates and rubbish collection that aren’t glamorous but serve the town best and keep the people happy and safe.


Recent Comments by John Bell

Fighting youth crime, not just in office hours
Julia Gillard’s Royal Commission into sexual abuse of innocent children had a golden opportunity to shine a light into this tunnel of darkness.
However, for political reasons that can only be guessed at, the commission’s terms of reference went after specific religious institutions, and glaringly shied away from lifting the scab from – or even touching – the NT and State secular institutions of government shame.
It will simply never happen because politicians and the bureaucracy are joined at the hip.
I would challenge any of the major parties, including the Greens, to stand up in Todd Street and Mitchell Street on their moral soap boxes and debate this among the people without parliamentary privilege to hide behind.
They simply would not have the guts.


Fracking probe boss gets facts wrong, says Australia Institute
Hard to get too upset about all the ruckus up your way.
Down here in Mexico, The Garden State, we are locked out by the Green crowd from ALL land gas mining and exploration, fracking or conventional.
Trillions of litres in a resource-saturated state.
At the same time, our power stations are closing and our crazy left wing government is buying gas from Queensland for enlightened Lygon Street late-sipping Mexicans at inflated prices, producing the world’s highest household power bills out here in the Struggletown ‘burbs.
China and its state-owned businesses must be counting the days until they have bought our natural resources from under our feet.
They must be freaking laughing at our gas fracking stupidity.
So look out, you lads and lassies in the Territory!


To die for country
Kieran and Alex. Thank you for your thoughts. In 1980 I sat one hot afternoon in the grandstand at the Gardens Oval in Fanny Bay with board members during the National Aboriginal Sports Foundation’s national footy and netball carnival.
I asked our public officer, Captain Reg Saunders MBE, the first Aboriginal soldier to become a commissioned officer in the Royal Australian Armed Forces, what did he think of the War Memorial in Canberra.
Reg paused a moment, looked at me and said with quiet dignity and respect: “It is a good place.”
In 1985 Reg was appointed to the Council of the Australian War Memorial.
I guess what I am trying to say is that if there is a single place in all of Australia that embodies our national identity as a people together, with an inclusive soul for all of us, it is that place.
Within its walls are commemorated our soldiers, nurses, and all those who have served, forever treated equally with quiet dignity and respect – most inclusive of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander brothers and sisters.
It is the resting place of the Unknown Soldier, where so many souls of unknown identities of all racial origins are now at peace, brothers and sisters together, free of today’s politics of race and sovereign power.
Everyone who has ever had anything to do with the Memorial, from Brendan Nelson down to the volunteer tour guides, some of whom are my long-time friends, will tell you of the memorial’s all-embracing warmth, an inclusive spirituality that is beyond words.
It is a good place for all Australians.


To die for country
@ Kieran Finnane: “His emphasis is on Indigenous service in Australia’s overseas conflicts, which he sees strangely as a denial of their Aboriginality.”
With due respect, I strongly disagree with Ms Finnane’s take on Brendan Nelson’s statement. The Australian War Memorial in Canberra is a very special place. A unique symbol of Australia’s national cultural identity.
Over many years, I sat within its walls, gazing at the depictions of old battlefields where my (our) relatives died, contemplating the ultimate sacrifice by men and women from every part of the world, from every race and walk of life.
Every Anzac Day for so many years I stood in the pre-dawn darkness among the trees up the hill behind the Memorial, with the last remaining Diggers of my late dad’s battalion in their fold up seats, rugs over their frail old knees, listening to their whispered stories, gratefully accepting the passed-around hip flask to keep out the morning chill. A thousand candles flickering through the trees down the hillside.
And then, as the Last Post sounded at the break of dawn, the sleeping kookaburras all around us in the trees awoke and rose laughing cheerfully to greet the morning sun. Every year, without fail.
The old Diggers would look up to the sky, thinking their own thoughts, smiling.
Anyone who knows the Aboriginal legend of the kookaburra and the spirit of the young desert warrior now at peace will understand the beautiful cross-cultural significance of that poignant moment.
Above all else, the moment you walk through its portals, the War Memorial wraps you in a lovingly warm embrace of peace and unity, a universal oneness that makes no distinction of race, colour or ethnicity.
That is what Brendan Nelson meant. It is Mumu Mike Williams’s take, and it is my take.


The eternal chase: songlines of the Seven Sisters
@ Craig San Roque. Thank you for an interesting and entertaining snapshot of Greek mythology. Makes a good comparison with the story in Aboriginal Songlines.
They are great stories that have stood the test of time simply because they are great stories that stand alone.
It is only when they are captured by today’s Left and the Human Rights Brigade, the champions of victimhood and causes, and start putting today’s alternative spin on them, that the lustre and sheer brilliance begins to fade.


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