@Alex Nelson. 21 December … Ssshhh … I wouldn’t broadcast …

Comment on Santa’s big day: Hot and maybe wet by John Bell.

@Alex Nelson. 21 December … Ssshhh … I wouldn’t broadcast this too loudly if I were you.
Today’s non-Christian Greenies are the throwbacks pre-Christian worshippers of Nature’s solstices.
At the moment, they are getting a freeby long weekend, a public holiday on 25 December, Christ’s Birthday, Christmas Day.
It might give Richard di Natale and his cohorts ideas. They might want to shift the public holiday from 25 December to their sacred day, 21 December, or they might get greedy and want both.
They might even want to make 21 December Australia Day – or should that be 21 June? Ho!Ho!Ho!

John Bell Also Commented

Santa’s big day: Hot and maybe wet
@ Alex Nelson, “The pagans have it”: Not sure that the uncertain date of Christ’s birth matters.
A very long-time Aboriginal friend of mine, a very well known sporting identity, I am sure you know, was brought into white civilization from the Kalgoorlie goldfields scrub by his tribal mum 74 years ago as a tiny little bub.
They did not know the date of birth so they settled on 1 July, as they did in those days. Celebrated joyfully every year for 74 years.
My point being that our arrival in this world is to be celebrated. Every soul is equally important. Taught by Christ.
Emperor Constantine was the first ruler to set 25 December because he recognised this fact.
He adopted the pagan Saturnalia to celebrate Christ’s birth to make the point that whereas the pagans celebrated going into darkness then coming out of it cyclically every six months, the coming of Christ – Christmas, no matter what day it is – celebrates coming out of darkness into everlasting enlightenment, love and hope.
So I think Christians actually have it over the old pagans who are forever going around in seasonal circles.
So. A Happy and loving Christmas to you and to all staff and contributors at Alice Springs News Online.


Recent Comments by John Bell

Alice in thrall of week-long sports extravaganza
@ Bob Taylor: Thank you for that, mate. You mention three great Alician names in sport – past, present and future: Rhonda, Dick and Emma.
Three wonderful ambassadors who have enriched and continue to grow Alice’s proud sporting heritage.


Alice in thrall of week-long sports extravaganza
The Masters Games has been a great initiative over the years. Many good people have been associated with its organisation and all are to be congratulated.
Above all else the games place a positive focus on togetherness and inspiration in the community as we grow older.
For inspiration, it does not come much more magnificent than the wonderful effort by Dicky Kimber in the 100m track event in the 2018 Games on the weekend.
The lad is a living example of loving life and all it has to offer. Every step of that 100m was gold. Wish I could have been there to see it.


Ice Age in Alice
@ Eugene’s Mate: I am surprised that ice as you say does not have a foothold in remote communities out of Alice.
It is so cheap, so readily available and is an epidemic in the lower socio-economic strata of the general urban community, in all ethnic sections, including Aboriginal, in Melbourne.
It is almost off the scale and out of control.


Ice Age in Alice
@ Russell Guy. Sorry mate. While I really do respect your view on this subject – and we have all seen this growing problem first hand for many years everywhere – I think the police request for light beer at the Masters Games was laughable.
It was like removing a very small, well behaved fitness-conscious pimple once every two years on a very large 24/7/36 public pumpkin of out-of-control drug and alcohol addiction in the Alice (as down here in Melbourne Town).
Common sense should have told the cops that this Masters Games judgment call simply got it wrong.


Tony Abbott sent packing on his first Aboriginal envoy trip
It has bothered me for a long time that individuals in remote Aboriginal communities so often claim to speak for the whole community in Australian politics without any questioning of other members of the community for their individual political views.
I began to see the politicisation of remote isolated communities in the NT first hand during my work in the Alice and then in Darwin in the late 60s and 70s.
One major party in particular captured the political mindset of so  many communities with hard sell, patronising welfare policies with a sit-down money focus that I thought it made so many good people in these communities vulnerable and captive to the group think mentality of a particular major party view.
I believe it created a  political herd mentality perception of Aboriginal people that demeaned them in the wider white community. 
It suggested that individual Aboriginal people in remote communities were incapable of forming independent individual views in Australian politics.
This did not promote healthy political debate in those communities and made Aboriginal people with different views fearful of speaking out. 
Only in fairly recent times have Aboriginal individuals started to challenge and break that mindset.
So, when reading media political releases such as this one on Borroloola, my first thought is to ask – who wrote the report? What is his or her political affiliation? And have all residents in that community expressed their individual views in the compiling of the release?
Until the person(s) who write such media reports come clean with honest, transparent and factual answers to those questions, the ugly herd mentality captive image of remote communities will remain entrenched in the Aussie political landscape for the vast majority of white urban dwellers in the Big Smoke.
And the diverse political views of Aboriginal people will continue to be devalued.


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