@ Kieran Finnane: “His emphasis is on Indigenous service in …

Comment on To die for country by John Bell.

@ Kieran Finnane: “His emphasis is on Indigenous service in Australia’s overseas conflicts, which he sees strangely as a denial of their Aboriginality.”
With due respect, I strongly disagree with Ms Finnane’s take on Brendan Nelson’s statement. The Australian War Memorial in Canberra is a very special place. A unique symbol of Australia’s national cultural identity.
Over many years, I sat within its walls, gazing at the depictions of old battlefields where my (our) relatives died, contemplating the ultimate sacrifice by men and women from every part of the world, from every race and walk of life.
Every Anzac Day for so many years I stood in the pre-dawn darkness among the trees up the hill behind the Memorial, with the last remaining Diggers of my late dad’s battalion in their fold up seats, rugs over their frail old knees, listening to their whispered stories, gratefully accepting the passed-around hip flask to keep out the morning chill. A thousand candles flickering through the trees down the hillside.
And then, as the Last Post sounded at the break of dawn, the sleeping kookaburras all around us in the trees awoke and rose laughing cheerfully to greet the morning sun. Every year, without fail.
The old Diggers would look up to the sky, thinking their own thoughts, smiling.
Anyone who knows the Aboriginal legend of the kookaburra and the spirit of the young desert warrior now at peace will understand the beautiful cross-cultural significance of that poignant moment.
Above all else, the moment you walk through its portals, the War Memorial wraps you in a lovingly warm embrace of peace and unity, a universal oneness that makes no distinction of race, colour or ethnicity.
That is what Brendan Nelson meant. It is Mumu Mike Williams’s take, and it is my take.

John Bell Also Commented

To die for country
Kieran and Alex. Thank you for your thoughts. In 1980 I sat one hot afternoon in the grandstand at the Gardens Oval in Fanny Bay with board members during the National Aboriginal Sports Foundation’s national footy and netball carnival.
I asked our public officer, Captain Reg Saunders MBE, the first Aboriginal soldier to become a commissioned officer in the Royal Australian Armed Forces, what did he think of the War Memorial in Canberra.
Reg paused a moment, looked at me and said with quiet dignity and respect: “It is a good place.”
In 1985 Reg was appointed to the Council of the Australian War Memorial.
I guess what I am trying to say is that if there is a single place in all of Australia that embodies our national identity as a people together, with an inclusive soul for all of us, it is that place.
Within its walls are commemorated our soldiers, nurses, and all those who have served, forever treated equally with quiet dignity and respect – most inclusive of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander brothers and sisters.
It is the resting place of the Unknown Soldier, where so many souls of unknown identities of all racial origins are now at peace, brothers and sisters together, free of today’s politics of race and sovereign power.
Everyone who has ever had anything to do with the Memorial, from Brendan Nelson down to the volunteer tour guides, some of whom are my long-time friends, will tell you of the memorial’s all-embracing warmth, an inclusive spirituality that is beyond words.
It is a good place for all Australians.


Recent Comments by John Bell

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Millie and John. Just in case you may have lost touch with Gordon and Norma.
They moved from Canberra when Gordon retired and shifted to Mosquito Bay on the NSW South Coast several years ago.


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The increase in house break-ins is a trend not just in Alice, but in Melbourne and elsewhere around the country.
It is an invasion of privacy that frightens most people and destroys public confidence.
Could this growing phenomenon be partly because of the fact that social media has broken down the old standards of personal privacy in the community?
If young people can so easily say and post just about anything to bully in a public media forum, then it stands to reason that their respect for the privacy of others must gradually be eroded.
The only way to teach them respect is to show them the suffering their invasion causes.
If that does not work, then payback becomes an option that is gathering momentum in a community that is frightened by the failure of the authorities to deal with it.


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Crofty was a goodhearted bloke and he listened to what everyone had to to say.
That struck me about Crofty. He was a great listener.


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@ Ali Corcoran: “The power of arguing from an evidence base–for which anthropogenic causation is overwhelming. Having an ‘entitled’ belief does not make that belief correct in the real, non-flat-earth, world.”
To put King or Queen Canute into perspective.
Four centuries ago, the overwhelming consensus was that earth was, indeed, flat. The “real world” of the day. Then along came Galileo.
In the same vein when overwhelming argument was that the sun revolved around the earth, along came Copernicus.
In essence, the Canute story is an analogy for mankind’s assumed superior knowledge over nature.
To say that man’s ever-refutable consensus evidence proves man’s superior influence over nature is open to challenge.
That is not only Jacinta’s right. The history of eminent precedent tends to make her position highly credible.


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Chiara: Climate change deniers have equal rights with climate change alarmists to place their arguments in the public arena.
In the olden days King Canute believed as sovereign ruler that he could control the forces of nature.
He found out to his great disappointment that he could not do so. And got very wet feet in the bargain when he tried to command the tides.
Alarmists believe that humans can alter and change the climate, just as King Canute believed. Deniers say they can’t. Both sides are entitled to their beliefs.
Whether it is alarmists blaming people’s suffering in the Alice heat on anthropogenic causes or deniers saying it is the natural cycle is a difference of opinionated debate that will be with us until hell freezes over (so to speak).
As the meerkat says in the tellie ad: “Simples!”


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