Would be interesting to see the outcome if Worksafe was …

Comment on Pack of girls attacked me, says Chinese on working holiday by Local1.

Would be interesting to see the outcome if Worksafe was contacted about this.
Absolutely the company has a duty to their employees, there should certainly be a policy dealing with the safety of employees departing late at night, especially where the hazards of this town are so well known.
Regardless, the employer has a duty to identify the risk and put controls in place, this would include making the staff finishing their shift aware of the risk to their health and safety by not having suitable transport home, and alternatives if transport was not available.
It could be a journey claim if the worker was traveling directly home at the completion of a shift.
A case in point is the woman attacked by the magpie, losing her eye on her way to work.
A joint responsibility between the employer and the shopping center, especially as the hazard had previously been identified.
There are additional duties imposed if it involves young or inexperienced workers.

Local1 Also Commented

Pack of girls attacked me, says Chinese on working holiday
@ Evelyne: I, like Laurence, write under a pseudonym due to where we work.
Erwin knows me, and he certainly understands the implications if I used my real name.
I do however enjoy the opportunity to contribute to community discussion without the fear of disciplinary action taken against me/us, and in the past, I have both agreed with you and shared arguments as well
I do agree that it takes a village to raise a child, as long as we live in a village, where a small number of people all must contribute to ensuring the survival of all.
Many villages in the traditional sense would be no more than 100 people. We are not a village, we are a large town with many different groups, cultures, beliefs, and expectations, and that expression is not relevant to our contemporary way of life.
The problem people like me have with this “throw away” expression is that it deflects responsibility, where people can say: “It’s not my fault, it takes a village to raise a child, so its the fault of the villagers, not me.”
Wrong, you gave the example of how you raised your children, I am raising mine and Dr Who raised his.
The people who helped were not villagers, they were paid professionals offering a service.
The concept of a village implies aunties, uncles, and close-knit members of a small group.
In those days if the kids mucked up, they would be given a clip under the ear by another villager who you knew.
Would you be happy with somebody smacking your child for running amok in Woolies?
Those days of a village are long gone, and the people who have the primary responsibility for raising the child are the parents, nobody else.
Yes, we may use doctors or teachers or police to augment our responsibilities, but the buck stops with the family.
The problem is many of the youths running wild today are from parents who probably were raised in that village environment, out bush on traditional lands, where the kids could run wild.
Unfortunately, the concept of urban drift has occurred, yet the additional responsibility that goes with living in an urban environment is not understood by these parents.
The grandparents probably say: “That’s alright, you used to run around when you were kids” without the understanding that the dangers of today were not there in those days, let alone the propensity to use violence to survive and then thrive on the streets.
My problem is that the euphemism of taking a village to raise a child ignores that fact that village life is far different to life in modern society, and is used as an excuse to abdicate responsibility.


Recent Comments by Local1

Park, lights: ideas for a brighter town centre  
James, the idea of the riverside area is to make it unattractive to drunks, but making it attractive to shoppers, families and so on.
The grassed area outside the Todd Tavern would just be a starting point [followed by] the other side, where the bistro, bottle shop, coffee shop and cinema are located.
If that area all the way up to the Parsons Street area is developed, featuring a massive, landscaped skate park complete with undercover indoor cafe, gift shop, picnic area and outdoor sports area, it would be a terrific expansion of the Mall, as long as it was policed properly to keep it that way.
Build it high enough to incorporate flood mitigation and planning for flood events (eg proper planning), it could be fantastic.
If Matt Paterson and his fellow councillors, through consultation with the Chamber of Commerce, residents and relevant Aboriginal groups, it will be a terrific legacy.
Some of the skate parks in major regional areas are not hidden away, they are celebrated and woven into the fabric of the community, and are virtually public parklands that have the infastructure that attracts young people and families.
All the best Matt, love to have a chat to you about it.


Park, lights: ideas for a brighter town centre  
Hmm, using the riverbank for a community open space, that seems familiar, thought that appeared in the readers’ comments section last year some time. Glad somebody has picked it up.


More government handouts for alcohol traders
Can we get a program called HomeSecure, as once they discover it’s harder to steal from the shops, our backyard beer fridges are next.
Close down all the IGAs and smaller licences, in exchange for them running an off site seperate Dan Murphy’s.
Only one store to patrol, pricing in line with national prices, and secure to prevent break-ins.
We get lower prices all the time, a lot less police needed for the only solution that ever really worked, and less humbug at shops. Problem solved.


How much of our relationship with Aborigines is hypocrisy?
The battle to fall over ones feet in the race to show how much Australia respects it’s Aboriginal people is nauseating to me, and obviously also to Mr Baranski.
The Welcome to Country ceremonies that are no more than tokenistic gestures for tourists are everywhere and are unfortunately portrayed as a long held traditional cultural ceremony, when in fact they were invented in 1984 in part by Ernie Dingo.
The Aboriginal people in suits nod along when our so called leaders play this game and the fee of sometimes thousands of dollars is paid.
Sadly it makes no difference at all to the lives of the traditional Aboriginal people who struggle to successfully integrate with our modern society.
Same with the divisive acknowledgment of country where we humble pay respect to Aboriginal elders or leaders past, present and in a crystal ball moment, those of the future as well.
They fail to mention anything about the hard work, determination, resourcefulness and hardships endured by the pioneers and explorers that made the country what it is today, failing to mention them is blatant hypocricy and once again there seems to be no real advantage for the bush Aboriginie who should somehow appear greatful they live in the town that boasts one of the biggest renal dialysis facilities in the southern hemisphere.
So much rhetoric and time is spent on issues of the past so the politicians and handwringers feel good they have paid respects, but how many of them, or these tour guides have sat down with real traditional people and understood that they really don’t care to much for tokenistic gestures, because they do nothing for them.
On the surface in the big cities with all the billboards about Aboriginal history, place names, tribal groups makes it seem that all is well, then people see what is really like for the traditional Aboriginal, as opposed to those of mixed heritage.
I quite often attend sporting events and occasionally officiate at them, and to look out at the crowd to see black and white sitting together shoulder to shoulder demonstrates that this is probably one of the least racist towns I have lived in.
Many social outings in this town have a lot of blacks and whites just mixing as workmates, team mates of simply as friends.
Unfortunately the current political PC rubbish is causing more of a divide than anything.
I just wish they would forget their apologist ideals and self flagellation, and accept that we all make up this country, and we should give understanding and respect to everyone that lives here, not hold up one as more important, or more deserving of acknowlegement than the other.


If you can climb Mt Everest and in Yosemite, why not Uluru?
Former NT Surveyor Marc Hendrickx has been speaking nationally against the absurdity to closing the climb.
As he points out there was never any cultural taboos about climbing it until the rangers bean telling the TOs that climbing it disrespecting their culture.
Quite a lot of misinformation is clarified as well.


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