Once again thank you Kieran for an excellent report, and …

Comment on 24/7 youth centre: bridge between us and them? by Evelyne Roullet.

Once again thank you Kieran for an excellent report, and thank you Janet, Steve and Wayne to their tremendous work.
It was very disappointing to see that once again the project has been turned around to Aborigines like if they were the only children in town in need of a safe place to go night time.
Doreen Carrol has all my admiration, but I would like her to tell us if she will be caring for children of different ethnicity, and why the Aboriginal grandmothers never invite the grandmothers of the town to their meetings.
In the 70s mothers and grandmothers used to talked about children behaviour, but that was before all those different organisations were created. Doreen should be on the committee to represent the needs of her community, but not the only one.
I also had the feelings that some speakers forget what was the aims of THIS WAY: “Welcome kids in, welcome their freedom to use the space how they will, with adult supervision.”
And were more concerned about their positions Quote: “Mr Walder continued. Working with trauma affected children is very specialised, he said. Work needs to be from a trauma-based lens, otherwise it is just a bunch of activities.”
I would have like to be able to ask him if those traumatised children were getting help on the streets at all hours of the nights.
Some speakers insisted the children should have been invited to the meeting.Invited to what? to ask them what they want? What would happen then if we do not get premises for the drop-in centre? More hope and more let down?
No one asked: “Do you love children, would you care for even the most difficult ones? I feel this is the most important requirement, followed by the love of our community – with an ochre card, naturally.”

Evelyne Roullet Also Commented

24/7 youth centre: bridge between us and them?
@ Kumara :”Please give some respect to Aunty Doreen. While Im sure she wasnt’ waiting for a ‘personal invitation’ why couldn’t someone give her a call”.
Aunty Doreen is a Luritja / Western Arrente grandmother our councillor Jacinta Price who looks after Aborigines’s issues, could have given her a call.
Personally I called some of my friends, but they were all gone to The Top End for the memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed at Barunga Festival in the Aboriginal community of Barunga. But they are very interested in the project.


Recent Comments by Evelyne Roullet

Police want parents to stop youth crime
Billy de Goat and James T Smerk: I know and understand, but I still think it is not normal and sad. It used to be enough to write after our name “Opinions are my own and not the views of my employer”. A pseudo means: “I have an opinion but not if it means that I get fired.”


Crunch time in Anzac Oval standoff
If the art centre / gallery is built on Anzac Oval, it will join the list of disappointing tourist attractions across the globe.
One I am particularly familiar with is the site of the pyramids in Egypt.
Travellers moaned that the Pyramids of Giza site can be seen from Pizza Hut, and are so close to the noise and chaos of the city (I could see them from my hotel).
They are flanked on three sides by the roads and neighbourhoods of Giza.
The same goes for the Great Sphinx.
Most of the photos taken of the pyramids in Giza are from a certain angle or from fairly close up, making them seem like they’re in the middle of the Egyptian desert.
In reality however, they’re really on the edge of the sands and practically in a few people’s backyards.
Welcome to Alice Springs, the Aborigines’ Art Center of Australia with no atural backdrop (I wonder what will be the scenic photo used for publicity?) but supermarkets, Plaza, coffee shops, war memorial, pubs.


Police want parents to stop youth crime
Yes Paul, but fear gives power to bullying, and the hooligans of our society.
The children in our streets are big bullies who know we will not punish them by fear of being labelled racists.


Police want parents to stop youth crime
I agree with Aranda Elder, about the lack of respect of the kids vandalising our town. Respect for others is very important, but respect for oneself is fundamental since we will value others to the extent that we are able to value ourself.
If we don’t respect ourselves we will not be respected by others either, and we cannot teach respect to others.
Thus I started to wonder about all anonymous writers on Alice Online, as there are more anonymous writers than normal names: do they have self respect?
It is essential to feel safe, to be able to express ourselves without fear of being judged, humiliated or discriminated against.
If you’re presenting a controversial opinion, you should be willing to defend it.
If you’re writing in a genre you fear others won’t respect, keep in mind that this is their problem, not yours.
And finally, if you’re writing material that you feel ashamed of, it’s probably better to change the material than to change your name.


Gallery: Council did not say boo
Well said Louise and I believe that all involve in NT Government and Town Council should read the book of Kathleen Kemaree Wallace, Listen deeply.
Deep listening means to hear every dimension of the other person, both what is said as well as what is implied.
It means to hear the words and the emotions underneath them and to hear the general disposition and mood of the person: To hear all of it.
Kathleen is the senior artist for the art centre and over the last 20 years has mentored and supported other women artists and young women.
She is internationally regarded and her artworks can be found in many major Australian Collections.
Two years ago, over 100 non-Indigenous people from across Australia gathered at the Edge of the Sacred conference at White Gums at Honeymoon Gap, outside of Alice Springs, to hear Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann and others speak about the spiritual road to reconciliation with Aboriginal people.
Dr Miriam-Rose Ungunmerr (AO) is an Aboriginal elder from Nauiyu (Daly River), where she served for many years as the principal of the local Catholic primary school. She is a renowned artist, activist, writer and public speaker.
Rather than speak of treaties and politics, Miriam Rose, shared the concept of quiet meditation, an Indigenous practice that her people use to find out who they really are, their purpose, and where they are going.
Obviously none of our politicians took much notice.


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