Research is the answer. How is it that the Sundrop …

Comment on Northern development is getting cracking – slowly by Trevor Shiell.

Research is the answer. How is it that the Sundrop enterprise in Port Augusta produces 15% of
Australia’s tomatoes from three Ha of salt marsh using recycled water, solar energy and technology?
How is it that this technology is being replicated in Somalia and not here?
And how is it that an Australian company has had to go to Israel to grow medicinal cannabis because of their nano technology in irrigation, not recognised here?
Why did it not happen here as it has in the US and Canada?
How is it that we could have a transport hub where three transcontinental road routes, a transcontinental rail link and an internationally rated airport and a vital gas intersection, are all adjacent to one another (Brewer) but never recognised as a huge asset, or used because of their proximity and direct connections to Asian markets?
And how to make our beef industry more productive when research on that topic (our Acacias, being leguminous) is being done in India, Africa and Asia and not here?
We built ordinary houses where we should be displaying all of that and what is possible.
And how is it that the latest research on improving soil microbiology and fertility (Michorizza) was done here in 1988?
Most of our politicians would not know what that was let alone how it could be used for improved crop productivity as it is doing in other places.
And how is it that the whole of the Danish train system runs on alternative energy and we take for granted our intense solar potential?
Could we not do the same with the North – South rail?
After all we have the sun and the Vanadium for the batteries.
No wonder it has taken three years to get this far.
Bring in Elon Musk with his committee of 1, and forget about conventions and committees.
Singapore and Lee Kwan Yu got it right, and I suggest that every politician and planner should read his story.

Recent Comments by Trevor Shiell

Horses starve, rotting carcasses near homes
As with camels, goats, pigs, cats, foxes and dogs they are ignoring the science.
A friend use the natural pheromones of a mating female to aggregate and shoot foxes in SA 50 years ago when skins were highly priced.
The animal lovers in Europe soon shot that down to the detriment of our local natives.
He built a unit at Surfers with the proceeds.
Together with Nicholas Rothwell and Peter Cave we witnessed perhaps 1000 camels gathered for the same reason north of Lake Eyre 10 years ago and I have since seen the same thing on the Sandy Blight road.
I have had the same experience in aggregating feral goats on the SA/NSW border, and many of us have experienced dingos howling for a mate.
We don’t need helicopters, but a basic understanding and the application of their natural mating behaviour.
But on many matters we close our eyes and minds.
A useful addition to CDU would be to commission this work to be done by the CRC unit for feral animal control currently based in Tasmania, as I remember it.
There, of course, are plenty of feral dogs, camels, donkeys, pigs, horses and pigs (Sic) but far more votes.


All views about gallery location will be considered: Lauren Moss
The obvious place is still in conjunction with Yirrara College.
After all it’s their culture that is on display and they need to be involved in acquiring the skills need to manage it.
I wonder how much longer it will be before powers that be realise that there is a whole new tourism province waiting out there south of The Gap where there is a captive market on the way in from the Airport or Uluru.
I have directed a number of people to the airport fields in order to see camels, many from the Welcome to Alice rock, and on Tuesday last week 30 vehicles pulled in there in there in the hour or so I was there.
Market research? Where is it? The fossil museum also is a vain attempt to bolster tourism numbers at that end of the Mall. Let’s see some numbers. In my opinion it should have been at Alice Springs Research Institute with the rest of the geological history, just as is happening at Richmond and Winton, and an integral part of a brand new tourism precinct.
And what about the potential of Desert Knowledge Australia to demonstrate what is happening here in arid zone technology?


Half a billion dollars for NT roads: Scullion
Money for the Tanami is good news.
That is the shortest distance from the food bowl to the Eastern markets and begs the question of why has it not been recognised that we are at the intersection of three major cross country highways, a national rail link and an International airport and created a National transport hub at Brewer to capitalise on it.
Now add in the rapid advance of electric vehicles and electric trucks are going to revolutionise the transport industry here.
Tesla have an electric truck on the market with a range of 500 km and huge cost savings over diesel with other trucking companies close behind.
In addition the Halls Creek people are planning a transport hub in Kalgoorlie to cater for the same hub market.
Once more we will be caught napping, as with the cultural centre.
It’s no coincidence that Coober Pedy is installing massive solar and wind generation.


Gallery swap: Aborigines second in pecking order
Still the most obvious site is south of The Gap adjacent to Yirara College where the students can proudly be involved in displaying their own cultures and get background experience in commercial operation of a business. They could display the positive side of Indigenous education – an Indigenous school of the air, which I believe would be even more commercially (and culturally) successful than the existing one.
Where do visitors see bush tucker or Indigenous medicinals? Perhaps between the houses at Kilgarrif. Add to that an up to date visitors centre at the Welcome Rock and you have the nucleus of a brand new tourism hub, leaving the current CBD for he historians.
Where have all the verandas gone? They were part of our history, and culture.
As Graham Sawyer recently pointed out in Darwin this does not happen because of the well dug in vested interests North of the Gap.
Just another example where we have been gazumped, as there are at least two more cultural centres now on the drawing board. Time for a radical change in thinking.


Government backflip leaves Centre’s youth worst off
Handball the whole problem to the NT Law Society for them to administer and personally look after these people.
After all, between them and sections of the media they seem to be able to point out all the problems, and make all the money from them.


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