@ Alex Nelson: Let’s face it. Self government creates more …

Comment on 1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley by John Bell.

@ Alex Nelson: Let’s face it. Self government creates more chiefs per number of mug punters.
It is a lucrative salary and power drug that attracts would-be chiefs like bees to the honey pot.
I lived for years in Canberra. More ministers than you can point a stick at. For a concentrated population of 250,000 to 300,000 in a small region that has every advantage and service you could ever imagine in a centre that houses our Federal Parliament.
Their pomposity and self-importance is laughable. At least the NT, with its population spread out over huge geographical and logistical issues, has a case.

John Bell Also Commented

1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ Alex Nelson: Your view of the optimism of the McMahon era is appreciated. I went to Alice in 1967 within weeks of Harold Holt’s referendum.
I was there when Whitlam came to power.
There came a different type of optimism that brought with it massive influx of “sit down money”, grog, drugs, a huge human rights push (RDA of 1975) and a push for self-government that grew.
Federal politics radically changed – was reversed – from Holt to McMahon to Whitlam. The “progressive” tide of money and anti-discrimination was unstoppable.
The NT has always been shaped by Federal politics.
Whatever optimism there was once under conservative government, changing politics created serious social issues, demanding responsible self-government in these terribly uncertain times.
Federal or outside interference cannot be trusted.
Historical facts cannot be revisited to change what is in place today.


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
@ Alex Nelson. I believe that the geographical isolation of remote NT communities is a deciding factor in supporting a self government structure with its base in the capital city of Darwin.
It promotes a spirit of community inclusiveness with access to accountable elected decision makers who are homegrown, rather than under the control of interstate forces.
For example, the fast developing NT economy needs local Territory policy.
Another example is the need to understand the inclusion difficulties of isolated communities with different cultural backgrounds. I would not trust control of these areas of community concern to “offshore” states.


1 Territory too fixed on opposition to fracking: Lambley
There is another option. In the 1980s in the early years of ACT self government, Dennis Stevenson formed the Abolish Self Government party.
If enough members were elected to form a quorum, the pary would voluntarily dissolve the Legislative Assembly and return the ACT to the former territory administration.
The former administration ran the territory brilliantly, providing first class road rubbish and rates services.
Of course, the major parties, whose members had all been hangers-on office staff on Capital Hill but were now big shot politicians and Ministers for this and that, and the Canberra media, ganged up on poor old Stevo, ostracised him as only vicious self-seeking pollies and media can do, so he lasted only one term.
But heck, a lot of people voted for him.


Recent Comments by John Bell

Heatwaves need to be treated as emergencies: Cr Cocking
@ Ali Corcoran: “The power of arguing from an evidence base–for which anthropogenic causation is overwhelming. Having an ‘entitled’ belief does not make that belief correct in the real, non-flat-earth, world.”
To put King or Queen Canute into perspective.
Four centuries ago, the overwhelming consensus was that earth was, indeed, flat. The “real world” of the day. Then along came Galileo.
In the same vein when overwhelming argument was that the sun revolved around the earth, along came Copernicus.
In essence, the Canute story is an analogy for mankind’s assumed superior knowledge over nature.
To say that man’s ever-refutable consensus evidence proves man’s superior influence over nature is open to challenge.
That is not only Jacinta’s right. The history of eminent precedent tends to make her position highly credible.


Heatwaves need to be treated as emergencies: Cr Cocking
Chiara: Climate change deniers have equal rights with climate change alarmists to place their arguments in the public arena.
In the olden days King Canute believed as sovereign ruler that he could control the forces of nature.
He found out to his great disappointment that he could not do so. And got very wet feet in the bargain when he tried to command the tides.
Alarmists believe that humans can alter and change the climate, just as King Canute believed. Deniers say they can’t. Both sides are entitled to their beliefs.
Whether it is alarmists blaming people’s suffering in the Alice heat on anthropogenic causes or deniers saying it is the natural cycle is a difference of opinionated debate that will be with us until hell freezes over (so to speak).
As the meerkat says in the tellie ad: “Simples!”


The stolen child who went to university
I understand that the term Stolen Generation was first penned by Sur Ronald Wilson, president of the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission in his HREOC report. In 1996.
All discussion should begin with that report and Sir Ronald’s use of the expression.
I do not know if it was Sir Ronald’s inspiration or whether someone else coined it and he simply appropriated it.
Whatever the origin, it is now a fundamental part of the children-at-risk community dialogue.


Fire management inadequate to non-existent: ALEC
Would high temperatures in Alice and other places have anything to do with the fact that this year the earth’s path around the sun is at its closest in the solar cycle?


Don’t mess with our treasures, says Alice
@ Gavin Carpenter: Following on from Alex’s comments, Gavin, you will get good value from Wayne should you make an inquiry. Krafty is a good man. Knowledgeable, passionate and thorough.


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