Land-locked Bangtail’s ancient link to oceans

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“Raising awareness for our oceans from the middle of the desert may seem ironic,” says James Melky, completing Marine Biology at Flinders University, and son of Alice Springs Rotary Club member Eli Melky, organiser of Monday’s Bangtail Muster, whose theme is – well – Oceans.

 

“The oceans are more connected to us in Central Australia than we see,” says Mr Melky junior.

 

“After all, Central Australia was once hidden underneath the Eromanga Sea, where remnants and fossils are etched into our history.

 

“The Bangtail Muster is brought to life each year through the creations and imaginations of our youngest generation.

 

“As these children grow, they will come to know the wonder of our oceans and continue to explore them. It is our job to lead the way through ocean conservation and one day this responsibility will be passed to them.

 

“These children whom we see in the parade will become the stewards and caretakers who will continue the fight to conserve our oceans as we have done before them.

 

“We fight to protect our oceans today so that our children inherit a world that resembled the one that has allowed us all to thrive,” says Mr Melky junior.

 

Image from last year’s parade.

 

 

 

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2 Comments (starting with the most recent)

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  1. Trevor Shiell
    Posted May 3, 2019 at 11:56 am

    The geological history of the area and ranges in particular has unfortunately never been a feature of tourism here.
    I tried to explain what they were looking at to a friend on Anzac hill some years ago and finished up with an audience of around 20 interested people.
    The geological history is fascinating and so obvious from Anzac but never mentioned there.
    It is well demonstrated at the Desert Park.
    The Larapinta seaway, the origin of Larapinta Drive, is an unknown item to most residents and few have heard of the Alice Springs Orogeny, the cause of much of what we see and live with daily.
    It’s sad to go up there to watch the sun go down and find the view obstructed by the trees so thoughtfully planted in front of the viewing seats.
    A couple of seats on the hillside below the rail and tree line would add a lot of amenity for our visitors.

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  2. Psuedo Guru
    Posted May 2, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Nine out of every 10 living things currently live in the ocean. It is precious.

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